In [1]:
# Make the Requests module available
import requests
In [2]:
# Create a variable called 'api_search_url' and give it a value
api_search_url = 'https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/search/pages/results/'
In [85]:
# This creates a dictionary called 'params' and sets values for the API's mandatory parameters
params = {
    'proxtext': 'archeology' # Search for this keyword -- feel free to change!
    
}
In [86]:
# This adds a value for 'encoding' to our dictionary
params['format'] = 'json'

# Let's view the updated dictionary
params
Out[86]:
{'format': 'json', 'proxtext': 'archeology'}
In [87]:
# This sends our request to the Trove API and stores the result in a variable called 'response'
response = requests.get(api_search_url, params=params)

# This shows us the url that's sent to the API
print('Here\'s the formatted url that gets sent to the ChronAmerca API:\n{}\n'.format(response.url)) 

# This checks the status code of the response to make sure there were no errors
if response.status_code == requests.codes.ok:
    print('All ok')
elif response.status_code == 403:
    print('There was an authentication error. Did you paste your API above?')
else:
    print('There was a problem. Error code: {}'.format(response.status_code))
    print('Try running this cell again.')
Here's the formatted url that gets sent to the ChronAmerca API:
https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/search/pages/results/?proxtext=archeology&format=json

All ok
In [88]:
# Get the API's JSON results and make them available as a Python variable called 'data'
data = response.json()
In [89]:
# Let's prettify the raw JSON data and then display it.

# We're using the Pygments library to add some colour to the output, so we need to import it
import json
from pygments import highlight, lexers, formatters

# This uses Python's JSON module to output the results as nicely indented text
formatted_data = json.dumps(data, indent=2)

# This colours the text
highlighted_data = highlight(formatted_data, lexers.JsonLexer(), formatters.TerminalFormatter())

# And now display the results
print(highlighted_data)
{
  "totalItems": 6740, 
  "endIndex": 20, 
  "startIndex": 1, 
  "itemsPerPage": 20, 
  "items": [
    {
      "sequence": 13, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1932-01-31/ed-1/seq-13/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19320131", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "ART CELEBRITIES\nTO BE HEARD CERE\nJ-ectirre Series of Cathedral\nWomen Will Be Opened by\nDean Chase.\nSome of the most distinguished au\nthorities and lecturers on art and archi\ntecture in the United States are to ap\npear in a series of lectures in Wash\nington in the next few weeks. The\nscries of lectures has been arranged\nby Mrs. Frank B. Noyes, chairman of\nthe District section of the National\nWoman's Committee of Washington\nCathedral. Sir* Willmott Lewis will\npreside and introduce all the speakers.\nUnusual interest already has been\ngroused in the program, which follows:\nFebruary 26\u2014Ancient Temples\u2014\nAssyrian. Egyptian, etc. Speakers.\nGeorge Henry Chase. Ph. D . professor\nof archeology and Dean < f the Gradu\nate School of Harvard University.\nMarch 4\u2014Greek and Roman Tem\nples. Speaker, David Moore Robinson,\nPh. D . L. \u201cH. D\u201e LL. D., professor of\narcheology and epigraphy. Johns Hop\nkins University, and director of Johns\nHopkins Museum.\nMiss Emerson on List.\nMarch 11\u2014Oriental Temples Speak\ner, Miss Gertrude Emerson, co-editor of\nAsia Magazine and author of \"Voice\nless India.\"\nMarch 18\u2014Medieval and Renaissance\nCathedrals. Speaker, Charles Z.\nKlaudcr. M. F. A . for some time execu\ntive architect at Princeton University,\ngold medalist American Institute of\nArchitects.\nApril 1\u2014American Places of Worship\nMayan and Indian. Colonial. Modern,\nfepeaker, Everett Victor Meeks, M. A.,\nprofessor of architecture, Yale Univer\nsity, and dean of the Yale School of\nfee Fine Arts.\nThe lectures will be held in the\nphinese Room of the Mayflower Hotel\nbn Friday afternoons during Lent at\ni o'clock and will close promptly at 6.\nfehey will all be fully Illustrated.\nLong Harvard Career.\nDean Chase, the first lecturer, is a\nHarvard graduate who has spent all of\nfiis life teaching in the university ex\ncept for his earlier years as a master\nof Greek and Latin at St. Mark's\nSchool. Since 1916 he has been Hudson\nprofessor of archeology and since 1925,\nin addition, dean of the Graduate\nEehool of Arts and Sciences. He is as\nsociate editor of the American Journal\nof Archeology, fellow of the American\nAcademy of Arts and Sciences and\nauthor of many works of distinction, in\ncluding \"Greek and Homan Sculpture\nIn American Collections\" and a \"His\ntory of Sculpture.\u201d He is editor of\nHarper's \"Fine Arts Series\" and is par\nticularly well known as an effective\nand delightful lecturer.\nOPTOMETRISTS TO MEET\nFive States to Be Bepresented Here\nat Clinic Feb. 7 to 0.\nOptometrists from Maryland. Vir\nginia, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and\nDelaware will meet here February 7 to\n9 for a clinical convention, according to\nan announcement made today by the\nlocal committee in charge of arrange\nments for the session.\nClinical meetings and lectures, con\nducted by outstanding members of the\nprofession, will feature the Congress\nof Optometry. The committee super\nvising the conference includes M.\nLuther Dicus, chairman; Edwin H. Sil\nver, William Perau and Rex B. Sheley,\nell of Washington.\n\u2014\u2014. {'\nWill Describe Ancient Temples\nGEN. WESTOVER HERE\nNew Assistant Air Corps Chief Re\nports in Capital for Duty.\nBrig. Gen. Oscar Westover, Air Corps,\nrecently promoted and recently sta\ntioned at Fort Leavenworth, Kans., as\nan instructor at the General Staff\nSchool, Iras reported at the War De\npartment for duty as assistant chief\nof the Air Corps. In that capacity he\nfills the vacancy occasioned by the re\ncent promotion of Maj. Gen. Benjamin\nD. Foulois as chief of the Air Corps.\nGen. Westover is from Michigan and\nwas graduated from the Military Acad\nemy in 1906. He served successively\nin the Engineers, Infantry and the\nSignal Corps until August, 1920, when\nhe was transferred to the Air Corps.\nDuring the World War he served as\ncolonel in the National Army and\nwas awarded the Distinguished Service\nMedal._\nGEORGE HENRY CHASE,\nProfessor of archeology, Harvard Uni\nversity, who is to discuss ancient tem\nples, notably Assyrian- and Egyptian,\nAbove: Temple of Fhylae, Egypt.\nf Established\n35 Years\nKAHN on 7th St.\nL \u25a0 ..-n' I\n35 Yw.\nSpecials Monday and Tm$day\nGenuine Toric\nFar or Near,\nComplete WitS\nft>c4! or Metal F t*m\u00ab\nComplete Outfit, Wjffi Case and Cleaner hmpdttd\nGenuine Toric KRYPTOK\nInvisible Bifocal Looms\nFirst and best quality. Toric\nKryptok Bifocal Lenses (one\npair to see near and far). Best\nlenses made. Sold regularly\n$15. Special price Monday end\nTuesday .....\nBetween F and G Streets\n- - - - - \u25a0 __________\u2014_______\u2014 _I\n\u25a0Year Loans\nto Home Builders\nofiorvd by\nMontgomery Ward & Co.\n\"The Coventry.'\u2019 Average monthly payments $50 to $60. Others as low as $20 a month.\nMonthly Payments IIE1HTCED\nfar loiter than your present rent\nOU, too, can own a beautiful home for the\nrent you are now paying, perhaps less. We\nlend you money for 15 years at only 6% interest.\n>We will furnish materials and supply money\nto pay for everything, up to 75% of the total\ncost of your home\u2014which includes our mate\nrials, your lot and estimated construction costs.\nEntire loan on first mortgage; no expensive sec\nond mortgage; no renewals necessary. Ward\u2019s\nserves you direct for entire 15-year period.\nYou Pay Back Only $S.44 a Month\n(including interest at only 6c/c)\non each $1,000 of Loan\nYou pay but $8.44 a month for each $1,000\nborrowed; which includes paying off the\nprincipal, interest and all charges. First\npayment is not due until the first of the\nfourth month after loan is made! Your\nsatisfaction is guaranteed by our 60-year\nrecord for fair dealing and over $165,000,000\nin resources.\nOur method of construction saves up to 30%\nto 40% of usual labor costs and gives a stronger,\nbetter built house. Free plans and step-by-step\ninstructions enable you to do a part of the\nbuilding yourself, if you desire.\nMail coupon today\nSend for our free book of homes. It gives full\ninformation about our amazing offer and shows\n65 modern home designs\nfrom which you can choose.\nOr we can supply any home\niyou desire, if it does not\nshow in our book.\nMail the coupon NOW.\nAll your life you\u2019ll be thank\nful for taking this step.\nMontgomery Ward & Co. j\n90S Vee St. N.E.. Washington. D. C.\nPhone North I Hi*\nPlease send by mail your 118-page book which 8\nshows 65 designs of Wardway Homes and gives\nfull inlormation about your 15-year loan for\nhome butldert.\nKama-- \u25a0\u25a0\u25a0. ..\nAdd r* j \\ .\u25a0. \u2014\u25a0\nCity..- \u25a0r\u2014\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0> \u25a0 -- . -\nMONTGOMERY WARD & CO.\n203 Vee Street N.K.\nWashington, D. C. l'hone North 1318\nk\nRetirement Sale\nWe Don\u2019t Have to Tell\nYou It\u2019s a Great Sale\n\u2014when you find startlingly low prices like these on our\nentire stock of thoroughbred Saks Quality merchandise!\nMen\u2019s Suits, Top\ncoats, Overcoats\nSWEEPINGLY REDUCED TO:\n*18 *21 *24\n*27 *31 *34\nBoys1 4-Piece Suits\nSWEEPINGLY REDUCED TO:\n*6.95 *9.65\nPrep 2-Trouser Suits\nSWEEPINGLY REDUCED TO:\nT4-95 ^16-95 ^1895\nChauffeurs\u2019 Clothing\nSWEEPINGLY REDUCED TO:\nSuits, $27, $34, $44 Topcoats, $34\nOvercoats, $34, $44, $53 Raincoats, $24\nCaps, $2.75 Gloves, $2.85 Puttees, $4.85\nOther Items for Men\nAT RADICAL SALE PRICES!\nShirts ...... . . $1.29, $1.45, $1.85, $2.55\nTies .55c, 85c, $1.15, $1.65\nHose t.z.:. 27c, 33c, 47c, 63c\nGloves. $1.35, $1.95, $2.15, $2.85, $3.55\nShorts... 47c, 55c, 67c\nAthletic Shirts ,,*.**,*,;.35c, 47c, 67c\nSweaters . . $2.65, $3.15, $3.65, $5.85\nPajamas.. . $1.29, $1.45, $1.85, $2.35\nLeather Coats_$7.45, $9.85, $11.85, $14.85\nKnickers .$2.45, $3.85, $4.85\nShoes. $4.85, $6.45, $7.45, $8.85, $9.85\nHats.... $2.85, $3.85, $5.45\nLounging Robes-~\n$5.45, $5.95, $6.95, $8.45, $10.95\nHouse Coats. $3.45, $4.95, $5.95, $6.95\nOther Items for Boys\nAT RADICAL SALE PRICES!\nShirts, Jr. Shirts\nand Button-on Blouses . . . 57c, 77c, 97c\nGolf Hose . . ..19c, 33c\nSweaters $1.35, $1.85, $2.45, $3.15\nKnickers .. 98c, $1.45, $2.15\nLeather Coats . . .. $6.95, $9.95\nAND MANY ITEMS NOT LISTED HERE!\nJJ/E don\u2019t have to tell you that\nprices like these mean only\none thing\u2014we are GOING OUT\nOF BUSINESS! We are clearing\nout every article of Men\u2019s and\nBoys' Apparel and Furnishings\u2014\nin a Retirement Sale that is un\ndoubtedly the BUYING OP\nPORTUNITY OF YOUR LIFE\nTIME!\nE don\u2019t have to tell you that\nyou are going to save a tre\nmendous amount of money\u2014one\nlook at the prices and you\u2019ll know\nyou have never before seen such\nmerciless reductions on merchan\ndise of the kind Saks sells!\nj^/E don\u2019t have to tell you that\neverything you buy during\nthis sale is of known Saks standard\n\u2014there is not a single piece of\n\"distress goods\u201d to be found in\nour store!\n^nd we don\u2019t have to tell you\nto come quickly. You know\nthat Saks merchandise can\u2019t stay\nlong, with prices as you see them\nhere!\nTHE AVENU6\nAT SEVBMTH\nAll Sales for Cash\nAll Sales Are Final\nAlterations at Cost", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_1arp_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1932-01-31/ed-1/seq-13.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "A-13"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 18, 
      "county": [
        "Cook County"
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily (except Sunday and holidays)", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045487/1916-02-28/ed-1/seq-18/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Chicago"
      ], 
      "date": "19160228", 
      "title": "The day book.", 
      "end_year": 1917, 
      "note": [
        "\"An adless daily newspaper.\"", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Available on microfilm;", 
        "Description based on: Nov. 1, 1911.", 
        "Issue for <Nov. 24, 1911> lacks vol., no., and chronological designation.", 
        "Issue for Nov. 4, 1911 erroneously designated as Oct. 4, 1911.", 
        "Issue for v. 3, no. 290 (Sept. 7, 1914) erroneously designated as v. 3, no. 300 (Sept. 7, 1914). The error in numbering continues.", 
        "Issue for v. 5, no. 214 (June 7, 1916) erroneously designated as v. 5, no. 214 (June 6, 1916).", 
        "Issue for v. 5, no. 7 (Oct. 5, 1915) erroneously designated as v. 5, no. 7 (Sept. 5, 1915).", 
        "Issues for <May 7-17, 1915> called also \"Moving Picture Edition.\"", 
        "Issues have no page numbering.", 
        "Saturdays have Noon and Final editions, Dec. 28, 1912-June 21, 1913; Saturdays have Noon and Last editions, June 28, 1913-<Dec. 13, 1913>; began issuing daily Noon and Last editions, Dec. 20, 1913-July 6, 1917.", 
        "Vol. 5, no. 36 (Nov. 6, 1915) issue called also \"Garment Workers' Special Edition.\"", 
        "Volume numbering begins with Nov. 20, 1911 issue."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "Illinois"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Chicago (Ill.)--Newspapers.", 
        "Illinois--Chicago.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204048"
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Chicago, Ill.", 
      "start_year": 1911, 
      "edition_label": "LAST EDITION", 
      "publisher": "N.D. Cochran", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [], 
      "lccn": "sn83045487", 
      "country": "Illinois", 
      "ocr_eng": "mmmmmmmmmmmmsmmmm\n; -\nH\nH\nTHE WEATHER PROPHET\nBy Gertrude Mary Sheridan.\n(Copyright, 1916, W. G. Chapman.)\n\"Honk-honk!\"\nCrabbed, miserly old vjared Dunn,\nseated on the porch of his low one\nstory house, bent his ear and listened\nintently.\n\"Ho-o-onk!\"\nHis thin sour lips formed an ex\npression of comprehension and satis\nfaction. He smiled in an eerie way.\n\"You beat 'em all, old bird!\" he\nchuckled, \"and I get the credit for it.\nMornin' neighbor,\" he bobbed to a\npassing asquaintance \"mowing?\"\n\"Meadow strip hay, yes.\"\n\"Get it in afore Wednesday, then,\"\nadvised Jared, with a wise look at the\n\"Wet spell?\"\n\"Sure thing, within- twenty-four\nhours.\nThe sky was clear and spotless, but\nRufus Dawes quickened his step. If\nthere was one weather-versed man in\nBridgeton, it was Jared. He never\nprophesied wrong. The almanac\nmight err, the signal service quibble,\nbut Jared never made a mistake.\nHence, his neighbor hobbled off at an\naccelerated pace to save his menaced\nhay crop.\nThen Jared Dunn, double-faced old\nskeesicks that he was! ambled enjoy\nably around to his extensive poulary\nyard. It was with eyes of pride and\nexultation that he viewed one partic\nular fowl among the numerous. This\n'was a gloriously streaked and crested\ngoose. It was pacing about in a con\nsequential way, as though aware of\nthe extreme approbation of its own\ner. It was still honking, but low and\ncrooning, as though talking to itself.\n\"Daily report, all the same, old\nHonolulu!\" approved Jared. \"I\nwouldn't care to part with you.\"\nHonolulu was a bird of passage,\nstroay domiciled in an alien land.\nA wild jose of superior endurance\nand flying ower, it had landed down\nin the poultry yard among other more\ncivilized fellows about a year previ\nous. There was a jagged wound in\nits neck and as Jared came to exam\nine this, he found imbedded within it\nthe broken off stone head of an ar\nrow. It was by pure accident that this\narrow had played an important part\nin the fortunes of Jared. He chanced\nto relate the incident to a college .pro\nfessor, whose fad was archeology and\n\"I Wouldn't Care to Part V.\"lh You.\"\nkindred sciences. The professor took\nan interest in the circumstance. The\narrow head was one identified as used\nby ah obscure tribe in the Sandwich\nIslands. It was apparent, therefore,\nthat Honolulu had winged a memor\nable flight over land and sea thou\nsands of miles, to domesticate itself\nin an humble poultry yard in a\nstrange land. The incident of the long\nflight of the fowl, was published in\nseveral scientific journals, the naina\ni\nJ\n1rt\"?5?ifr -rt. \". VV\nriil-AM- jW4Gi,", 
      "batch": "batch_iune_hotel_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "day book.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-02-28/ed-1/seq-18.json", 
      "place": [
        "Illinois--Cook County--Chicago"
      ], 
      "page": ""
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 13, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1932-02-21/ed-1/seq-13/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19320221", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "TEMPLE LECTURE\n\u2022 TO START FRIDAY\nDean Chase of Harvard Will\nDeliver First of Series at\nHotel Mayflower.\nDean George Henry Chase, Ph.D., of\nthe Oraduate School of Arts and\nSciences and professor pf archeology of\nHarvard University, will deliver a lecture\non \"Ancient Temples\" next Friday aft\nernoon at the Chinese room of the\nHotel Mayflower In the first of a series\nof Illustrated lectures being given under\nthe auspices of the District section of\nthe National Women's Committee for\nWashington Cathedral.\nAssyrian. Egyptian and other coun\ntries\u2019 ancient temples will form the sub\nject of his lecture and Dean Chase will\nexhibit a large number of beautiful illus\ntrations, collected by himself and other\narcheological authorities, during his ad\ndress. The lecture will begin at 5\no'clock. The series has been arranged\nby Mrs. Frank B. Noyes, chairman of\nthe District section of the committee,\nto be held each Friday afternoon dur\nmg\nSir Willmott Lewis, Washington cor\nrespondent for the London Times, will\nIntroduce Dean Chase.\nOne of the most noted American\narcheologists. Dean Chase has been at\nHarvard University during practically\nhis entire teaching care?r. He has been\nthe Hudson professor of archeology since\n1916 and dean of the Graduate School\nsince 1925. He also has conducted\nmany notable expeditions for ach olrgl\ncal excavations in Asia Minor and\n^Northern Africa.\nDean Chase Is a writer and editor of\ndistinction in his field. He is associate\neditor of the American Journal of\nArcheology and editor of the Harper's\n\"Fine Arts\" series. His writings include\n\"Greek and Homan Sculpture in Ameri\ncan Collections'' and a \"History of\nSculpture.\" He is especially well-known\nas a delightful and effective lecturer.\n-\u2022\nMore than 8.000 American passenger\nautomobiles were imported into British\nBouth Africa last year.\nGEORGE HENRY CHASE.\nLEO BROTHERS LOSES\nAPPEAL FOR FREEDOM\nIllinois Supreme Court Uphold*\nHis Conviction in Slaying of\nlingle.\nBy the Associated Press.\nSPRINGFIELD. 111.. February 20 \u2014\nLeo V. Brothers, convicted as the man\nwho shot and killed Alfred J. Lingle,\nChicago underworld reporter, in a pe\ndestrian subway, has lost another ap\npeal from his 14-year prison sentence.\nThe Illinois State Supreme Court af\nfirmed his comiction late yesterday, two\nof the seven judges dissenting. Prose\ncutors indicated they would seek to have\nhim removed immediately from the\nCook County Jail to the State peni\nteniary at Joliet.\nAttorneys for Brothers, said by au\nthorities to be a St. Louis gangster, in\ndicated they planned to carry the ap\npeal to the United States Supreme Court.\nLingle was shot to death June 9. 1930.\nEight witnesses identified Brothers as\nthe killer. i\nTil 1 PM. Tomorrow\nTake advantage of the\nHoliday to profit by\nthis extraordinary\nSALE ~\nHahn Special $ -<.85\nMien\u2019s Shoes\nAt l nil\n\u00b0H.r\nMeti's\nStorq s\nr\nA Full Dollar\nbelow any previous\nSale of these\ncelebrated shoes!\n20 popular styles\u2014tan\nand black, Scotch\nGrains and Calfs. Us\nual \"Hahn Special\u201d\nquality. One of the\nbest \u201cShoe Buys\u201d\nwithin your ree\ntion. Surely\nhere to\no r r o wr\nloming\nMEN!\nAnd Washington Is\nSimply Thrilled\nwith these wonderful new\n\u201cHAHfti SPECIAL\u201d\nSHOES FOR WOMEN\n\u2022 9\nBack to a price of\n20 years ago!\nNot long ago,\nyou ladies well\nremember,\nthey were pre\neminent\nraises at\n$5.95!\nk\n*\nFeaturing genuine Karang Snake\u2014the new\n* \u201cGhillie Tie\u201d (pictured) and otther new thing*.\nAt our F St. and\nother women's sbvres\nMen\u2019s shoes oftly . . . 14th at^ G\n\u2014- - \u2014* \u201e \" \u2014\nIt is coming back\nmore gloriously beautiful and\nimpressive than ever it was ber\nfore. It is coming back with\nthe magnificence of great gov\nernment buildings and the hum\nming activity of many thou\nsands of government workers.\nOnce more and for\never \u201cThe Avenue\" is going to\nbe the city\u2019s finest street and the\nnation\u2019s foremost thoroughfare,\nan avenue of beauty and busy\nness that will be admired by all\nthe world. And exactly at the\ncenter of its famous mile, be\ntween the White House and the\nCapitol, stands this store which\nyou know as Kann\u2019s. (The\n\u2014 white arrow points to the\nsquare.)\nThe New\nKBBB\u2019t\n' Kann\u2019s has never\nlost its faith in \u201cThe Avenue.\u201d\nFor over thirty-eight years we\nhave been here, looking forward\nto this great day. We have\nseen every President since\nGrover Cleveland pass by on his\nway to the nation\u2019s highest of\nfice. And we expect to see\nmany more.\nYesterday we\nwatched time-worn landmarks\ndemolished and carted away.\nToday we look across the way\ninto mammoth excavations\nawaiting the builder\u2019s art. To\nmorrow we will be face to face\nwith the inspiring reality of the\nGovernment\u2019s greatest building\ndevelopment, the splendor of\nwhich this bird\u2019s-eye view so\nfaithfully reveals.\n*\nNor is that all!\nBelow you see another great\nbuilding project beginning al\nmost at our very front doors and\nextending away to our left in\nequally majestic beauty. It is\nthe proposed new seat of the\nDistrict government, flanking\nthe Mall development from this\nstore to the Capitol grounds.\nIs it any wonder we\nare proud to be here; that we\nare glad we have waited for\n\u201cThe Avenue\u201d to come back to\nus!\nIs it not fitting too,\nthat here on this beautiful Ave\nnue, at this very point, there\nshould be an institution of this\nkind, to serve visitors and resi\ndents alike in the many ways\nin which only an institution of\nthis kind can and does serve the\npublic!\nTkat's Kana\u2019t\nIta Tfce Orel*\n\u2014This store, too, is launching upon an important\ndevelopment. It is preparing to occupy the\nadjoining building which has .been the home of\nSaks & Go. these many, many years. And when\nalterations are completed a new and greater\nKann\u2019s, with entrances on all four sides of the\nblock, will serve you even more completely\nthan ever before. But, while it will be a bigger\nand better store, you will find within that same\ncomforting atmosphere and genuine hospitality\nwhich has made it the favorite shopping place\nof both past and present generations.\n\\\nMj.\nA.", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_1arp_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1932-02-21/ed-1/seq-13.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "A-13"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 101, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1934-12-16/ed-1/seq-101/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19341216", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "THE ROMAN EAGLES OVER AFRICA\nItaly Goes Forzvard\nWith Her Plan to\nFeed the Millions of\nthe Future\u2014Wash\ningtonians Hear Re\n*\nmarl\u00b7 able Story of the\nLinking of Arche\nology With Practical\nExpansion.\nHOW will Italy feed her rapidly in\ncreasing millions in the future?\nVital as this question is, it does\nnot seem at first to have anything to\ndo with the Capital of the United\nStates, and still less with the\nArcheological Society ol Washington. But last\nnight, before a brilliant audience greeted by\nAugustoRooso. Italian Ambassador, Washing*\nton society listened with rapt attention to one\nof the most remarkable Ftories ever told of the\nlinking of archeology with the most practical\nsort of colonial expansion, based upon the\nphysical necessities of a growing people.\nImperial Rome is coming to life anew In the\nDark Continent. Out of the blazing African\nsands the genius of Premier Benito Mussolini\nend the tireless enthusiasm of Gov. Oen. italo\nBalbo, Italy's famed air marshal, are bringing\ncrops and inscriptions, olives, oil and classical\nmonument*. And the story was brought to\nWashington because a professor of Latin in\nCleveland asked the Archeological Society of\nWashington to sponsor a trip for him to the\nvast new-old colonial empire of Tripoli and\nCyrenaica, in Northern Africa.\nYears ago, when \u03a0 Duce was merely \"growing\nup\" as the rebuilder of Italy's war-shattered\nfortunes, he took a momentous oath to the\narmy of Blaclcshirts he was leading upon Rome.\nIt was a dramatic moment. Disillusioned and a\nprey to fears for the future of their country and\nthemselves, the war veterans were in a plastic\nmood. Anything could happen. So when this\nuntried leader stood forth to address them,\nmuch more than the fate of Italy hung upon\nbis words.\nPARIS, Berlin, London, Washington all lis\ntened. And not one of these capitals cor\nrectly interpreted the epoch-making words\u2014\n\"I swear to lead our country once more in the\npath of Its ancient greatness!\" The world\nthought it meant only another fantastic dream\nof conquest by arms until, as time passed and\nthe genuinely constructive pattern of Musso\nlini's policy began to declare itself visibly,\nworld tension lessened and hope was established\nIn the room of fear. What Mussolini meant by\nhis prophecy was far greater and more substan\ntial than any vision of armed conquest could\nbe. Guided and inspired by the history of\nRome's most brilliant period, he looked far into\nthe future and planned to bring back by peace\nful, constructive means a glory and a stability\neven greater than that of the Imperial City of\ncenturies ago, for his eye was set upon the pos\nsibilities of Africa, the idea of Italy as a self\nsustaining nation, and a Northern Africa fer\ntile, productive, alive where it has long been\ndead, and ministering not only to the material\nwants of a strong and lusty nation of develop\ning powers, but to its cultural and spiritual\nneeds as well. How this ideal has been launched\nsuccessfully and is already attracting the close\nattention of the other nations was the story\ngraphically presented through the courtesy of\nAmbassador Rosso and of the Italian officials\nIn Rome and Africa.\nToo little attention has been given right along\nsince Fascism has proved a force to be reck\noned with, to the fact that Mussolini has shown\nhimself to be the world's most acute student of\nhistory. Every one who has read Roman his\ntory with any degree of attention has a smat\ntering of the facts. But it remained for II Duce\nto perceive in those facts which others had\nread end failed to heed the solution of the\nproblems under which Italy of post-war days\nwas groaning. He alone realized that history is\nalways a continuing force, instead of a static\nthing of interest only. He knew that the buried\ncity of Leptis Magna, whose glories had been\nlost under waves of desert sands for ages, at one\ntime paid Rome a tribute of a million pounds\nof olive oil each year. He recalled that the poet\nHorace, when he wished to show how rich a\nman was in his epoch, wrote that the fellow\npossessed granaries in Libya. Could not Italy\ndivert the unemployment and discontent of\nthousands of its ardent subjects to these fertile\nfields which were merely waiting the enthusi\nastic cultivation of youth and energy? Would\nnot such endeavor repay many fold all the effort\nand anxiety required, by reclaiming the desert\nand assuring Italy food for her hungry chil\ndren for the years to come, and nourishing their\nsouls also by bringing back the buried monu\nments and records of former Roman greatness\nIn her colonies?\nThe thing was so obvious, so simple, so en\ntirely possible if the co-operation of the people\nJ ieu\u00b7 of the native quarter of Tripoli from the castle. Balbo has given orders that the picturesqueness of this old section be\npreserved and that no modern buildings be constructed there.\nBY ARTHUR STANLEY RIGGS,\nDirector, Archeological Society oj Washington.\nwag assured, that nobody but genius could con\nsider it. The Ont steps were expensive. No\nIncome could be anticipated for a considerable\ntime. But the goal Justified the struggle, and\nItalian archeologiste began to dig Leptis Magna\nout oi the sands that centuries had piled above\nthis former metropolis. More archeologistt\nrame; more excavations were undertaken. Lit\ntle by little, not in & single city, but scattered\njudiciously through the Italian domain, emi\nnent scholars delved into the past. One of the\nmost interesting and appropriate inscriptions\nthey have dug up In Cyrene discloses the sig\nnificant fact that during the great famine in\nGreece, between the years 331 and 323 B.C.\nthis ancient \"African Athens\" exported some\n29,000 tons of cereals for the relief of the starv\ning Greek cities of Cyrene's motherland. Here,\nIndeed, as this inscription proves, were once\nfertile fields waiting only the plow and the seed\nand water to bring forth enough to make Italy\nIndependent and secure.\n\\i/TTH such facts as these in mind. Dr.\n* ' Kenneth Scott, professor of Latin at West\nern Reserve University, and long an ardent\nstudent of Latinized Africa, went to Tripolitania\nand Cyrenaica last Spring and Summer. At\nthe request of the Archeological Society of\nWashington, Ambassador Rosso and many\nItalian scholars who are friends of the writer,\ngave Prof. Scott unexampled opportunities for\nthe most searching investigations and scrutiny\nin the rejuvenated colonial empire in Northern\nAfrica. It is a huge territory covering some\n350,000 square miles and embracing the ancient\nprovinces of Cyrenaica and Numidia as its\nmost Important region. Today Libia Itaiiana\nextends east and west between the 10th and\n25th parallels of longitude, and, crossing the\nTropic of Cancer, reaches south to about lat\nitude 23 degrees north. Appropriately enough,\nwhen the Italian archeologists began to exca\nvate the theater at Sabratha, a ruined city of\nancient times lying on the coast to the west\nof Lepti's Magna, they brought to light the\n\u2014!\n\"Tyche\" op Tort une\" of Sabratha clasptBf\nhands with the goddess Roma in the presence\nof Roman legionnaires. The scene represents\na peace pact between the mighty Italian capital\nand the African city. Its significance of friend\nship is perhaps even keener today than when^\u00b7\nthe relief was sculptured. Today it occupies a\nplace of honor in the governor general's palace.\nSetting this before his audience with the\nfullest detail, Prof. Scott emphasized the prac\ntical values archeology has had more than once\nIn Italian history, citing the dramatic moment,\nwhen, \"in the darkest depths of the Middle\nAges, Cola di Rienzo for a breathless moment\nresuscitated the lifeless corpse of Rome with\nhis magic appeal to the glorious past of the city\non the Tiber\" through revealing to the people\nthe ancient bronze tablet inscribed with the\nLex Imperio Vespasiano. He showed his audi\nence that the power to appoint emperors had\nrested with the Senate and the Roman people.\n\"Then archeology had a ringing message, and\ntoday It brings again the same challenge,\" with\nthe monuments and other evidences of Rome's\"*\nAfrican past as inspiration and stimulus to a\nrevived Italy in the guiding of the new Italian\nState. It is fortunate that in Gen. Balbo. the\nDuce has a lieutenant who is a most enthusias\ntic Latinist, a firm believer In th< destiny ot\nmodern Rome, and a man of boundless enthusi\nasms who Is administering his tremendous\nprovince in a spirit of liberalism which accords\nthe scientist a place of high honor. For Balbo\nhas made an astonishing practical use of the\ntreasures the archeologlsts have found.\nThe palace of the governor general of Trip\nolitania and Cyrenaica, the sprawling, irregular\nfortress-castle of ancient times guarding the\ncity of Tripoli, juts boldly out into the clea\u00bb\nemerald of the sea. It could hardly be bettered\nas an epitome of both the purpose and the\nexecution of Balbo's remarkable plan. The\npalace is famjliar to every schoolboy because\nof the depredations of the Barbary corsairs\nwho were severely mauled in 1815 by an Amer\nican squadron which blockaded the pirate den.\nThe city of Tripoli, perhaps the most pic\nturesque and attractive on the whole north\nAfrican Coast, lies between the vast orange\nhued sand dunes. All along the water front\nwave the ostrich-feather plumes of tufted\npalms, beneath which bloom incredible banks\nof brilliant flowers. As a setting for the official\nheadquarters of the new government, nothing\ncould be lovelier. Under the Roman eagles of\n2,000 years ago, Libya was a rich land of\nwaving grain fields, fat vineyards and vastf\nolive groves. Mussolini saw that what had\nbeen could again be, and he ordered modern\nscience and art to perform the miracle of\nthe transformation.\n\\A/ASHINGTON knows the dashing young\n\" * Balbo well, remembering his tremendous\nfeat of flying here from Italy, SO it Was highly\nintriguing to the very people who had wel\ncomed his literal eagles of the air, to learn\nthat he has again soared high, and with equal\nsuccess in an entirely different medium: The\nrealm of practical statesmanship. One of his\nfirst tasks in adapting the old castle to the\npurposes of an up-to-date administrative office.,\nwas to make adroit use of the ancient works\nof art throughout the province as a series of\nsymbolic links connecting ancient Roman rule\nin Libya with the modern Fascist domination.\nThus the castle has been completely trans\nformed and is today a museum of pricelea\nrelics of the past, as well as the focus of tihak\nContinued on Fourteenth Page\nThe Duke of Aosta. commander of native troops who are mounted on camels. He\nis knoun as \"The Blue Prince,* because blue is the color of the House of Savoy.", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_1freud_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1934-12-16/ed-1/seq-101.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "13"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 74, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1932-03-20/ed-1/seq-74/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19320320", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "New Light on Beheading of John the Baptist\nBiblical Scholars Azcait With Interest Further Researches in Connection With Recen tly\nDiscovered Church Dedicated to Ancient Prophet and Fresco Depicting the Scene of\nHis Decapitation at Behest of Salome\u2014Archeological Research at Jericho.\nr BY MEURIG EVANS.\nLONDON.\nAT this time of the year the thoughts\nof the entire Christian world dwell\nfor a short space of time cm the\nfirst Easter and the circumstances\nwhich surrounded the stupendous\nevent which then took place. Pil\ngrims from the whole world have journeyed to\nthe scene of these happenings, some to view the\nactual site, the Mecca of Christianity; others\nto investigate the lore and tradition in which\nthe Holy Land is steeped.\nForemost among this latter class of pilgrims\nare those archeologists and learned men who\nhave concentrated their efforts on unearthing\nthe hidden secrets which will provide for\nmodem generations some idea of the ancient\ncivilizations which preceded the age of Christ\nand throw new light on the days of the\nprophets and apostles alike. This fascinating\nwork has been carried on at various times for\ncenturies, but it is only in comparatively\nrecent years that really important discoveries\nhave been made.\nOn tliis subject few men can talk with\ngreater authority than Dr. E. W. Masterman,\nwho has spent 20 years of his life in the Holy\nLand and has witnessed at first hand some of\nthe amazing discoveries made by the spade of\nthe excavator. In his office at the huge London\nHospital, which ministers to the sick and the\ndiseased of the East End districts of the great\nmetropolis, he told me the story of some of\nthese amazing finds which have led in certain\ncases to the confirmation of statements in the\nOld and New Testaments, and in others to the\nrational explanation of hitherto incompre\nhensible phenomena mentioned in biblical\ntradition\n11 TVER since the Crusades,\u201d Dr. Masterman\nEZ said, \u2018\u2018the civilized world has sought to\nsolve the mysteries which surround Palestine,\na country whose history is the history of the\nChristian religion, whose name of the Holy\nLand lends it a mythical glamour which attracts\nto its shores men of all nations and all creeds.\nArcheologists have made Palestine the object\nof painstaking and concentrated study, and the\nresults of some of the more important excava\ntory works that have been carried out there\nthrow new light on problems that have puzzled\nChristianity for thousands of years.\n\u2018\u201cThe work of archeologists in Palestine,\u201d he\ncontinued, \u2018\u2018is not carried on with the idea\nof completely solving one or two biblical\nallusions, or confirming or disproving facts, but\nwith the broader aim of enabling people of\ntoday to form an idea of the kind of civilization\nwhich existed in the time of the great Israel\nitish monarchies and the later Roman and\nHebrew dynasties to try to ascertain the kind\nof cities, houses and the modes and manner, of\neveryday life of the people of the time of Christ\nBind of preceding ages.\n\u201cIncidentally, there arises the matter of solv\ning or at least seeking a reasonable solution of\nthose topographical and geographical problems\nwhich have perplexed students of the Bible\nfor centuries. Many of these remain obscure\neven today, despite the great work done by\narcheologists of the different nations. Here I\nmay mention that attracted to this great work\nhere have been representatives of all nations,\nboth Jew and Gentile, Catholic and Protestant,\nand even those professing no religion but re\ngarding the matter from a purely historic or\nscientific standpoint.\n\"The United States has contributed as much\naa any country, and indeed more than most,\nto our present knowledge of the history of the\nland where Christianity was born, a knowledge\ncarefully and painstakingly garnered by scores\nof expeditions. In the case of all modern\nexpeditions full notes and plains have been\nmade, and these are continually being supple\nmented and increased by detailed contemporary\nobservations.\n'\u2022For example, today Harvard University, the\nPalestine Exploration Fund, the Hebrew Uni\nversity in Jerusalem and the British School\nof Archeology in Jerusalem are allied in\nexcavating the remains of the once famous and\nImportant city of Samaria. The chief credit\nfor the organization of the expedition lies with\nProf. Lake of Harvard.\n\u201cMany important finds have resulted. Twenty\nyears ago important excavations were carried\nout there by Prof. Reisner, but recent dis\ncoveries have carried the work forward a great\ndeal. This city dates back to the Israelite\nperiod, and the excavators have unearthed\nsufficient evidence to prove the magnificence\nand splendor of this mighty city of a bygone\nThe artist D. MoreUis conception of Salome being felicitated by her mother after being atearded the head of John the Baptist.\ncivilization. Palaces and churches and tombs\nof the early Christians have been brought to\nlight.\n11 TRACES of successive dynasties are not\nlacking, for Samaria had a checkered\nhistory. Prom the time of its capture by the\nAssyrians under Sargon about 722 B. C. to the\ncoming of Alexander the Great, nearly 400\nyears later, apparently it never ceased to be\nan important City. It was captured and de\nstroyed again in the second century B. C.,\nwith the result that evidences of its history\nabout that time are scarce, but during the\nRoman period it regained something of its\nformer glory.\n\u201cAfter the destruction of the Roman city\na Christian community continued to live on\nthis spot and recently we discovered, near the\nruins of the palace of Herod the Great, the\nremains of a Christian church whose existence\nhad hitherto been entirely unsuspected. Prom\nthe evidence it appears to have been a church\ndedicated to John the Baptist and the de\ncapitated head of St. John was treasured with\nin its walls for many years as one of its\ngreatest possessions.\n\u201cThe shrine found there has been alluded\nto by early pilgrims to the Holy Land in the\ntwelfth, thirteenth and fifteenth centuries,\nwhose descriptions of the shrine enabled us to\nidentify it with the one found in this newly\ndiscovered church.\n\u201cWe discovered also a marvelous fresco\ndepicting the beheading of St. John the Baptist.\nInvestigation showed that this church had\nbeen rebuilt and renovated at various times\nby the Crusaders, by the Greeks and by the\nLatins.\n\u201cAccording to tradition, the finding of the\nhead was made clandestinely in circumstances\nwhich, according to Prof. J. W. Crowfoot, are\nnot likely to have been commemorated until\nthe fame of the relic was noised abroad and\nits authenticity firmly established. Both archeo\nlogical evidences and literary tradition are\nvague as to the actual date of these happen\nings, but authoritative opinion places them\nsomewhere about the fifth century A. D.\n\u201cThese discoveries have confirmed in a very\nwonderful manner the mythical greatness of\nthe Israelitish monarchs; for instance, in the\nvindication of the character of Ahab, who.\naccording to biblical allusions, was something\nof a tyrant and always quarreling with the\nprophets. These records show him to have been\nindeed one of the greatest and most gracious\nof the Israelite kings.\n\u201cIn addition to the discoveries at Samaria,\nor Sebastia as it was called in later times,\nrecent excavations have brought to light much\nthat is new and confirmed ancient tradition\nconcerning the walled city of Jericho. These\nlatest efforts prove Jericho to have been a\nmighty city when the Israelites overthrew it\nand that it remained a deserted city for cen\nturies afterward.\n\u201cThe destruction of the city walls in the\nlate Bronze Age was followed by a great con\nflagration. The fire marks are plainly trace\nable in each home of the city that has been\nexamined. In some cases the charred debris\ndiscovered by the excavators was as much as\ntwo feet thick. We found burned beams and\npalm fiber thatch, apparently from the roofs.\nIt is clear, too, from all the evidence that the\ncity was burned while in active occupation,\nabout 1400 or 1500 B. C.\n\u201cIt should be remembered that the excava\ntions in Jericho were made possible by the\ngenerosity of two public-spirited men, Sir\nCharles Marston and the late Lord Melchett.\nWere it not for the lack of funds, which has\nalways been a handicap, much more important\nwork could be undertaken, and who knows with\nwhat astonishing results?\u201d\nDR. MASTERMAN referred also to other\naspects of the work of exploration and\nexcavation in Palestine\u2014-notably to the mag\nnificent accomplishments of that grand old\nman of Palestine archeology, Sir Flinders\nPetrie, whose unflagging efforts and tireless\nindustry have contributed so much to modern\nknowledge of the ancient civilization of the\nHoly Land.\nJust before his departure for Palestine, where\nhe is even now engaged in further excavatory\nwork, Sir Flinders Petrie described to me some\nof the more interesting features of his work.\nHe told how under the soil of one of the\nnumerous mounds, or small hills which break\nthe dull uniformity of the Southern Palestine\ndesert, he had found traces of successive civi\nlizations, each of which had erected a town\nor city cm the site, and each of which in turn\nhad vanished, leaving only a few ruined walls\nand tombs to mark the scene of its former\nsplendors.\n11 IVILIZATTONS,\u201d Dr. Masterman observe^\n\u201ccome into being, they flourish for a\nwhile, then decline into inevitable decay. That\nis what archeology teaches us again and again.\nNone of them has survived, and even our\npresent civilization will one day follow the\nfootsteps of its predecessors and give place to\nsomething different. It is a fascinating hobby\nto speculate as to what our next civilization\nwill be like\u2014perhaps a civilization from the\nEast where the world was cradled.\u2019\u2019\nOne of the most amazing features of Pales\ntinian exploration in recent years, however,\nhas been undoubtedly the explanation put\nforward by several authorities as to the marvels\nand miracles associated by tradition and bibli\ncal lore with the exodus of the Israelites from\nEgypt under the divinely inspired guidance of\ntheir leader, Moses.\nForty years ago Prof. Sayre of Oxford wrote:\n\u201cThe exact site of the \u2018Mount of God\u2019 must be\nleft for future explorers to discover.\u201d Since\nthen many travelers and explorers have tried\nto locate the spot. Among them have been\nsoldiers, statesmen, archeologists and British\nsecret service agents.\nProminent among them was Dr. Alois Musil\nof Prague, but perhaps most famous among\nthose who have trodden these paths across the\ndesert to investigate the mystery of the \u201cMount\nof God\u201d is the elusive Lawrence of Arabia,\nwhose work during the war took him over this\nterritory. He was followed by certain officers\nof the British Army whose duties have in post\nwar years been the maintenance of law and\norder in these areas. More recently the Rev.\nW. J. Phythian Adams. M. A.. D. S. O., M. C,\nhas contributed the weight of his authority\non this subject.\nBroadly speaking, the theory now gaining\nground is that the miraculous happenings\nwhich befell the fleeing Israelites may be\nexplained by the geographical features of the\nland.\n(Copyright. 1932.1\n^ A sane of Jericho as it stands today. Archeological research has betm resumed there.\n,\u00bb'# a? m tr navr' ul t> iv.'ms > to > c.'i ';r ''inm -ou' ',<\u2022 iv>h<\u00bb\u2018", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_1arp_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1932-03-20/ed-1/seq-74.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "4"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 69, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1935-01-13/ed-1/seq-69/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19350113", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "Fingerprints\n2ddo Ye a r S\n\u03c4\u03b7 Bible City's\nHistory\nPlain as the marks of a careless \u039b\nburglar, these imprints of ancient\npotters found in long-buried Mizpah/*^\nscene of Saul's coronation and a famous\npolitical murder; open far-reaching\npossibilities in the field of archeology\nm\u00b7\u00b7 <\u00b7\u038e ' \u25a0'\u25a0-mmmmm&z\nFingerprints of the same person, im\npressed on tu o different lamps found in\na tomb at Mizpah. The letters on the\nupper print, by the uav, do not date\nfrom ancient Mizpah. They were added\nfor identification after the excavation.\nBY EMILY C. DAVIS.\nINGERPRINT science has a new role\u2014>\nhelping archeologists to solve mysteries\nIt appears that potters shaping their\nclay in a Bible town, in the days of\nSamuel and Saul and on down to the\ntime of Christ, left fingerprints on their wares.\nThe potters died. The Bible town fell into\nruins. The broken lamps and pitchers, stUl\nfinger-marked, lay buried in debris.\nAnd now. several thousand years later, these\nfingerprints, newly discovered, are plain enough\nfor an archeologist to use them as dependable\nclues In reconstructing the town's history.\nThus, at last, archeology has succeeded In\nforcing fingerprint science to do its well known\nkind of detective work on mysteries of the past.\nFor some time it has been hoped that cele\nbrated masters of Greek vase painting could be\nidentified by their prints. There are finger\nmarks on some of the vases by unknown Oreeks.\nWhat is sought is a fingerprint on ft signed\nvase. That could\u2014with luck\u2014be matched with\nprints on some of the unsigned vases. But so\nfar that quest has proved unsuccessful. All the\nprints on the puzzle-vases have been discour\nftgtngly different.\nSuccess in adapting fingerprint methods to\nBible explorations will renew the faith of arch\u00e9\nologie ts that modern fingerprint science can\nidentify the ancient dead. Possibilities In this\nfield may be far-reaching, for soft clay natural\nly catches finger imprints, and clay was the\nmain stuff of which the ancient world was\nmade.\nOut of lumps of pliable clay, the ancients\nmanufactured not only household dishes, but\nimages of Astarte and Baal, art vases, tablets\non which to write, and many of their houses\nand walls. There Is detective work ahead there\nfor scientists with microscopes and training In\nanalysis of fingerprint patterns.\nTHE Bible town which has yielded the first\nimportant fingerprint data is Mlzpah, fa\nmous for its associations with many Bible char\nacters.\nSince 1\u00b72\u03b2, this lont-buried town has been\nIn Bible ruins.\nthe scene of repeated scientific encampments.\nArab workers move about on the high mound,\nshoveling away earth, clearing city walls, carry\ning basket loads of archeological evidence down\nto the expedition offices below.\nThe leader of these excavations, which have\nJust entered upon their fifth season, Is Dr. Wil\nliam P. Bade, professor of Semitic literature\nand languages at the Pacific School of Religion,\nBerkeley, Calif. Hie exploration of Tell en\nNasbeth, as the site le called on modern maps,\nle one of the most complete pieces of digging la\nPalestine archeology.\nMl2pah was one of the Canaanlte cities that\nJoshua's spies saw when they went out to judge\nthe strength of foes In the Promised Land. The\nawestruck spies said the cities were \"walled up\nto heaven.\" Just a frightened exaggeration?\nWell, Prof. Bade found the wall of Mlzpah. and\nthat wall haa caused biblical scholars to revise\ntheir respectful opinions of Canaanlte building\nprowess.\nMlzpah's wall, unearthed, stands over 1\u03b2\nfeet thick and 20 feet high. When the Israelites\ncame to conquer Palestine, the wall must have\nstood full 40 feet high. Nevertheless, the Israel\nites took Mlzpah.\nAt Mlzpah, later, Samuel sat by the great gate\nand acted as Judge over the people. Prof. Bade's\nexpedition found this gate, the finest that has\nbeen discovered in Palestine.\nAt Mlzpah, Saul was chosen king by the cast\ning of sacred lots. The excavations have un\nearthed foundations of a large building, which\nmay well have been the temple where Saul\nwas crowned.\nAt Mlzpah later occurred a political murder\nwhen Oedaliah, a new and unsuspicious gover\nnor, invited Ishmael and his friends to a ban\nquet, though Oedaliah bad been warned that\nIshmael was his enemy. The banquet ended in\nan uprising and Oedaliah and other victims\nwere slain. Thirty bodies were cast Into a cis\ntern, there at Mlzpah. Prof. Bade's explorations\nrevealed a cistern mysteriously sealed over,\nwhich seems to be this ancient tale of political\nintrigue.\n|AR handles stamped with letters MZP have\n^ been found, helping to verify the site as\nMlzpah of Bible fame; also an agate seal bear\u00b7\n\u03b9 Ing the significant words, \"Belonging to Jaaza\nnlah, servant of the king.\" Capt. Jaazaniah,\naccording to Bible verses, went to Mlzpah to\noffer fealty to the governor there.\nThrough all these discoveries the excavators\nhave industriously collected a great many pot\ntery objects, brokeq and whole, used by people\nof Mlzpah In three or four thousand years \u03bft\nancient history. One season the workmen car\nried basket\u00b7 of pottery from tombs, wells and\ntrash deposits.\nProf. Bade le alert to the value of modern\naids in rediscovering the Bible world. That\nthere was a settlement on the mound, long\nago, he first deduced when he climbed the hill\nand saw broken chips of pottery lying among\nthe wheat and barley on the tilled surface.\nBefore he decided to dig, however, he sought\nevidence of the wall that would have sur\nrounded a city of Importance.\nFor this he needed a good airplane photo\ngraph, which might show, even under a blanket\nof earth, the faint shape of a once prominent\nwall. The German government came to his\naid with an enlargement of an aerial photo\ngraph showing environs of Jerusalem. Satisfied\nthat there was Indeed a wall. Prof. Bade set his\nmen to work and within half an hour the\ncorner tower of the wall of Mizpah bad been\nstruck.\nThey had not been digging long when the\narcheologlst began to wonder about finger\nprints. There were a good many prints on the\nclay lamps, jugs and bowls. Prof. Bade set aside\nthe ancient fingerprint records. He was re\nsolved to study them when he got away from\nthe crowded, busy days of digging.\nBack In his laboratory in Berkeley, he called\non August Vollmer, professor of police admin\nistration at the University of California and\nformer police chief of Berkeley.\nw \"It Is no reflection on the character of\nmembers of the venerable company of ancient\npotters to say that we are taking their finger\u00b7\nprints with the aid of the criminal Identification\nbureau of a California city.\"\nBible scholar and criminologist, working to\ngether, sorted out two kinds of prints in the\nclay evidence before them.\nOn large, two-handled Jars, the potters of\nMizpah had sometimes deliberately left thumb\nand fingerprints on the Jar handles. The pot\nters, who by the way were probably women,\ndid this as a trademaark, Prof. Bade concludes.\nGood workmen of every age have been eager\nto mark their own products.\nThe other type of print looks unintentional.\nThis type of mark occurs scattered over the sur\nface of bowls and other objects, as If the finger\nmarks had come there In the shaping of the\nclay.\nBy comparing fingerprints, Prof. Bade and\nProf. VoUmer have been able In many instance\u00b7\nto identify the work of the same potter.\nThe debris of a town like Mizpah lies in\nlayers buried by successive builders. In Bible\nGedaliah, the governor,\ninvited Ishmael and hi\u00bb\nfriends to a banquet, al\nthough Gedaliah had been\nwarned that Ishmael tvas his enemy.\nThe banquet ended in an uprising.and\nGedaliah and other victims were slain.\ndays each new set of inhabitants, after a fire,\nwar or other calamity, would level off the\nwreckage and build their new homes over the\nruins.\nThis fllling-in and levellng-off process often\ndisturbed the lower layers of burled history.\nProf. Bade explains. For that reason, ar\nch\u00e9ologie ts have trouble tracing the same layer\nof occupation over a 12-acre site such as Mix\npah represents. And that means doubt and\nmuch argument over the age and interpret\u00bb\u00b7\ntion of the historic features of the site.\nWhen clay Jara found in different parts \u00ab\u03b2\nthe mound bear the unmistakable finger marks\nof the same person, that is good evidence foe\nsettling arguments. Clay pitchers were fragile\n\u25a0tuff. They broke easily, got lost down well*,\nand in general lasted no longer than our own\neveryday breakfast sets. 80 the finger mark\u00b7\nof an Israelite potter on her work, wherever\nIt turns up, show that those parts of the mound\nbelong to the same era of city history.\nFarmers Get Break\nTHE fermera bave gotten s good break an\n' around In the past two years. They have\neeen their purchasing power Just about doubled\nand both their taxes and their Interest pay\u00b7*\nmente reduced.\nlfcxes on farms and fanning equipment have\ndropped In the two-year period from $478,000,000\nto $380,000,000 and Interest payment from\n$698,000,000 to $519,000,000.\nFigur\u00e9e gathered by the Bureau of Agrlculto\u00b7\nral Economics show that the net Income on\nthe farms has risen from $5,300,000,000 to\n$7,200,000,000, a very nice increase when it is\nconsidered that along with the rise In Income\nthere was also a rise in operating costs.\nOf course, along with the actual cash return\non crops there went also the rental, proceisiae\ntax and other benefit payments from the VM\neml Government, which aided materially\nraising the farm income.", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_1freud_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1935-01-13/ed-1/seq-69.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "5"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 16, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1923-04-07/ed-1/seq-16/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19230407", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "THE STAR\u2019S DAILY PICTORIAL PAGE\nL . v^.. tfl W. . - 11FB ID >M HOOVER. I inW tin .of tin- Vu Amui.-ur \\t\u00bb.l.-\u00bb..**'l* 1 a Am. rir.~\nA NFJ& I LANT IHi M CHINA. Miss Florence of the berrelarys are conferring in Washington with Mrs. Herbert Hoover on the nation-wide movement to promote health and physical education among the GEORGIA PEACH WELCOMES I Rh. IDE T. This tin\\ peach o th\noffice. Department of Agriculture, holding the Ma>flower rhododen- women of the country. Left to right: Dr. J. Anna Norris, University of Minnesota; Miss Helen McKinslrey, School of Hvgiene and Georgia variety greeted i resident Harding at a recent lawn fete at\n.Iron, a new plant mtroduee.l by the department from the mountains Chv s i.al Education, Sew York; Miss Blanche Trillin?. University of Wisconsin; Mrs. Hoover; Miss Ethel Perrin, Detroit public schools; Aupu>ta. Southern hospitality was especially noticeable to the presi\n\u25a0 Tin-' \\\\ ii' f . I\u00bbj r \\I cimS # *P|, pf< lure .iri,i *\u25a0!, S TOR STARTS ON LONG AL TO 1R Photo taken before Senator\nV RETAKE OUTDOOR SCULPTURE EXHiHtUO.V View ot the acUvity at American Acati- THE 3V E- TCR i 4 i j j tI -,i n i,, K station Jones of Washington started from the capital yesterday on a transcontinental automo\nemv of Arts and Letters, New York, showing sculptors assembling their work for an out- e.l Rear Admiral Sims retired, upon his v\u2022>\u2022\u00bb Goat IsUnd nasal training station, Strip to his home in Seattle. Secretary Hoover bids Senator Jones farewell,\ndoor exhibit of the National Sculpture Society, beginning April 12 San Francisco, recently. Seventeen hundred men in \u25a0 review \u2022 Mic trip to u copyright by Underwood 4 Underwood.\nCopyright by Underwood & I nnerwood. \u201c #\n. f ar^ i \\il . 1 ' ' of all Russia, who jmjl\nREUEI\\h.'\u00bb CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL. Michael Donaldson, who served JESS IS NOT A FAT MAN. All comment to the contrary, this photo- poes on lr j a i f or h; s ];f e j,, Moscow soon. The charge against him is BIZARRE PARIS FASHION. And it may he token up in this country,\nas a .sergeant in the \"Fighting 69th \u2019 (war designation of the 163 th In- graph, taken onlv a few days ago at Excelsior Springs, Mo., shows the \u2018'opposition to the. soviet government,\u201d practically the same as that The huge comb is of white ivory, carved in an unusually elaborate pat\n* fontry). received the congressional medal of honor yesterday at Gov- former heavyweight champion as \u201clean and fit for battle.*\u2019 Willard against the recently executed Mgr Butchevitch. wide WorldThoto. tern, and worn in the knot of hair. Wide World Photo.\nE C AL. Mi \u2022 in the I\u2022 A CO R N F\nif with us again. This ponograph was taken a few days ago near Yuba City, Sutler county, Calif. carnival of Art and Archeology League tonight, wearing oriental ing on 17th street between L and M streets northwest yesterday The stone was placed rj \u2122\nCopyright by Underwood & Underwood. eostnmo. . _ John L. Hmes, and Brig. Gen. Bnant H. Wells was chairman of the exercises. uy awn rnoiograpner.\nTHE EVENING STAR, WASHINGTON, D. C., SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1923.", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_armstrong_ver02", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1923-04-07/ed-1/seq-16.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": ""
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 27, 
      "county": [
        "Cook County"
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily (except Sunday and holidays)", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045487/1911-12-25/ed-1/seq-27/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Chicago"
      ], 
      "date": "19111225", 
      "title": "The day book.", 
      "end_year": 1917, 
      "note": [
        "\"An adless daily newspaper.\"", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Available on microfilm;", 
        "Description based on: Nov. 1, 1911.", 
        "Issue for <Nov. 24, 1911> lacks vol., no., and chronological designation.", 
        "Issue for Nov. 4, 1911 erroneously designated as Oct. 4, 1911.", 
        "Issue for v. 3, no. 290 (Sept. 7, 1914) erroneously designated as v. 3, no. 300 (Sept. 7, 1914). The error in numbering continues.", 
        "Issue for v. 5, no. 214 (June 7, 1916) erroneously designated as v. 5, no. 214 (June 6, 1916).", 
        "Issue for v. 5, no. 7 (Oct. 5, 1915) erroneously designated as v. 5, no. 7 (Sept. 5, 1915).", 
        "Issues for <May 7-17, 1915> called also \"Moving Picture Edition.\"", 
        "Issues have no page numbering.", 
        "Saturdays have Noon and Final editions, Dec. 28, 1912-June 21, 1913; Saturdays have Noon and Last editions, June 28, 1913-<Dec. 13, 1913>; began issuing daily Noon and Last editions, Dec. 20, 1913-July 6, 1917.", 
        "Vol. 5, no. 36 (Nov. 6, 1915) issue called also \"Garment Workers' Special Edition.\"", 
        "Volume numbering begins with Nov. 20, 1911 issue."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "Illinois"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Chicago (Ill.)--Newspapers.", 
        "Illinois--Chicago.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204048"
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Chicago, Ill.", 
      "start_year": 1911, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "N.D. Cochran", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [], 
      "lccn": "sn83045487", 
      "country": "Illinois", 
      "ocr_eng": "mmmmmmmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmwm\nTHE DAILY SHORT STORY\nThe Kiss.\nAnnette was sulking. I was\nsomething I had done or some\nthing Ihad not done who in\nthunder can -tell aboufa woman ?\nand I was penitent as' any Mecca-bound\nMoslem. She sat stiff\nand straighten the half-gloom of\nthe crowded wagonette, and\nwould not even talk of the\nweather. For my part, I whistled\nthe Viennese waltz she had al\nways loved, in the hope of making\nher sigh. Then I whistled the\n\"Saffron Sue\" air which she 'de\ntested, in the hope of rriaking her\nrage. But Annette sal stiff and\nstraight and cold like the statue\nof Juho in the art gallery.\nI stood that kind-of thing as\nlong as any man who is not a\nShoshone Indian or a Grecian\narcheology professor could stand\nit; then I reached for Annette's\nlittle, pinkish hand. She moyed\nit slightly, slowly backward. I\nfollowed up the beautiful member\narid- pressed three fingers close in\nmy big, rough palm. There was\nno answering pressure, but An\n'nette did not withdraw her hand,\nand she turned her fluffy,' straw\ncolored coiffure halfway toward\nme.\nm and Annette sighed at last.\nThe girl to the left of me fidget\ned about, and Bobby Gates across\nthe way told a boisterous story.\nIt all .threw the heart-chords out\nof tune for a-moment, so that An\nnette moved slightly away. I\nbad been too sudden you have\no handle Annette like a dyddite\nshell. I drew back myself and ad\ndressed a remark to the driver\"\nabout the worms getting Jhe to-\nbacco crop. Then Annette slid\nback toward me, arid there was\njust enough light to see the small\nhand assiime its old position\n. \"Sweet I whispereoV'don't\nmove away again. \"The very,\ntingle of your hand thrills me like\nan Edison battery, and I love you\nforever.\" , ,\nShe jerked suddenly away then,\nand I could see that she was try\ning to read my face in the gloom.\nThe girl at my left squirmed\nabout like a diamond-back rat\ntler.' The driver turned and ask\ned if I wanted to buy a good 3-year-ojd\ngray mule. But I burn\ned with love for Annette, and\nwould not \"be denied. I reached\nand drew her toward me. Some\nhow she seemed to give in all a\nonce and snuggle close it was\never Annette's dear way.\n\"Do you reaHy mean it, Dick?\"\nshe whispered.\n\"Wait until we get home and\nI'll make affidavit,\" I assured her. v\n\"I am going to kiss you.\n\"Oh!\" she cried sdftly, so that\nthe girl at my left started. \"Oh,\"\ncontinued Annette, \"some prying\nwretch would see you !\"\n\"Love is the greatest thing in\nworld, but it is invisible,\" I par\nried. \"But they would hear'\" de\nmurred Annette.\n\"None of these paltry creatures\nis attuned to such a pitch that he\ncould catch the vibrations of sen\ntiment,\" I answered. \"I think\nI shall kiss you on the lips.\" -", 
      "batch": "batch_iune_echo_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "day book.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1911-12-25/ed-1/seq-27.json", 
      "place": [
        "Illinois--Cook County--Chicago"
      ], 
      "page": ""
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 11, 
      "county": [
        "Cochise", 
        "Pinal", 
        "Santa Cruz"
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Weekly", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn85032933/1911-01-14/ed-1/seq-11/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Benson", 
        "Arizola", 
        "Nogales"
      ], 
      "date": "19110114", 
      "title": "The oasis.", 
      "end_year": 1920, 
      "note": [
        "\"An authority on mines and mining.\"", 
        "\"Devoted to Southern Arizona and Sonora.\"", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format from the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Published in Benson, Ariz., May 17, 1894-Nov. 22, 1894; Nogales, Ariz., Dec. 1, 1894-Oct. 9, 1920."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "Arizona", 
        "Arizona", 
        "Arizona"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Arizola (Ariz.)--Newspapers.", 
        "Arizona--Benson.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01224355", 
        "Arizona--Nogales.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01209594", 
        "Arizona--Santa Cruz County.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01207404", 
        "Benson (Ariz.)--Newspapers.", 
        "Nogales (Ariz.)--Newspapers.", 
        "Santa Cruz County (Ariz.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Arizola, Ariz.", 
      "start_year": 1893, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "Oasis Pub. Co.", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [], 
      "lccn": "sn85032933", 
      "country": "Arizona", 
      "ocr_eng": "a\nSaturday, Jan. 14, 191 1\nACROSS THE BORDER.\nA Mirror of Events Transpiring In Ihe\nNeighboring Republic.\nChihuahua Enterprise: The agri\ncultural company of the territory\nof Tepic has just got permission\nfrom the department of fomento to\nhave 300 Japanese families brought\nto that territory, to work on the\nagricultural lands owned by that\ncompany. The departraeut has\nauthorized some concessions to\nfacilitate the introduction of the\nimmigrants, and the prosperity of\nthe colony at Tepic. Another\nMexican company has just bought\n8,000 acres of land in the state of\nChiapas, and will also bring in\ncolonies of foreigners.\nMexican Herald: The national\nschool of archeology is to be in\naugurated within a short time and\nProfessor Eduardo Seller, has been\nnamed as director. Professor Sel\nler has asked the government of\n: Germany for permission to accept\nthe poet and as soon as this is\ngranted the inauguration will take\nplace. Columbia university of New\nYork has communicated to the\nsecretary of public instruction that\nit has named as its representative\nat the inauguration of the new\nschool Miss Isabel Ramirez who is\na professor of archeology in the\nNational Museum.\nChihuahua Enterprise: Experi\nments in cotton growing in the\nstate of Tamaulipas, Mexico, have\nresulted so satisfactorily that plan\nters there are enthusiastic over the\nprobability of cotton becoming one\nof the most profitable crops of the\nstate, according to United States\nConsul Clarence A. Miller, of Tam-\npico. In the vicinity of Columbus,\nTamaulipas, cotton was grown this\nseason for the first lime. Special\nseed was imported from Georgia.\nThe production was one bale and\nin some cases, more per acre. No\ntrouble was experienced with the\nboll weevil, but some damage was\ndone by the army worm.\nMexican Herald: The case of\nSamuel II. Hampton will not be\nheard in the first court of debates\nfor at least two months, according\nto information given out by the\npresident of that tribunal, which\nhas stated that all pending cases\nwill be taken up in their regular\norder and that it will take that\nlong to reach the Hampton case.\nIt will he remembered that Hamp\nton was sentenced to death some\ntime ago for the murder of a negro\nporter in a saloon in this city, and\nthat his counsel immediately ap\npealed the ca6e to the higher court.\nIt is now extremely probable, in\nview of facts which have recently\ncome to light that the prosecuting\nattorney will not ask for the death\npenalty in the higher court.\nMexican Herald: Twenty people\nin the Buen Tono saloon, at the\ncorner of Calles Delicias and Buen\nTono, witnessed a sad accident\nnight before last when Antonio\nVinon, a picador of the local plaza,\nshot and mortally wounded An\ntnnin Soriano, while explaining the\naction of an automatic pistol. Ac\ncording to witnesses, Vinon had\ntfikfin the cartridge holder from\nthe handle of the pistol and was\nshowing Soriano just how the gun\nworked, but forcot that a cartridge\nstill remained in the barrel of the\nsun and Dulled the trigger at a\nat his comrade's breast. Soriano\nwas taken immediately to the Jua\nrez hospital, where he regained\nconsciousness for a time, but died\nyesterday just twelve hours after\nthe fatal accident. Vinon im\nmediately gave himself up and was\ntaken to the sixth coinisaria, where\nhe is held to await an investigation\nof the accident. The men were\n.1 L i t e . 1 1 .. I\nme uesi 01 menus anu weie ruum\nmates. Both arrived in Mexico\nabout six weeks ago from Spain.\nThe deceased is a banderillero of\nthe very highest type and has\npleased the audiences of the local\nplaza on every occasion in which\nhe has been seen.\nMexican Herald: Imperial Po\ntentate Fred A. Hines, of the order\nof the Mystic Shrine, will arrive in\nMexico City Thursday evening\nover the Mexican Central railroad.\nHe will be met at the station by\nthe entire membership of the\nAnezah temule in this citv and\ntaken to his hotel. From there he\nwill be taken to the American club,\nwhere an impromptu reception will\nbe held. Next Friday the Anezah\ntemple will hold a ceremonial ses\nsion, previous to which a class of\ntwenty-five novice?, rounded up\nfrom various points in the republic,\nwill be conducted over the burning\nsands to the mecca in the temple.\nAfter the session is completed the\nentire number, novices and all,\nwill adjourn to the American club,\nwhere a banquet will be served.\nChihuahua Enterprise: One of\nthe largest real estate deals of the\npresent year, and indicating the\nbreaking up of the large ranch\nholdings into smaller agricultural\nacres, was the purchase today by\nJ. F. Lieber, of this city, and asso\nciates, of a 08,000 tract in the\nnorthern part of the state of Oaxa\nca, Mexico. This land is now de\nvoted to cane, rubber and coffee\nculture. It will be divided into\nsmaller tracts for colonization pur\nposes, and it is understood that a\nnumber of northern capitalists will\ntake up the matter for colonization\nat once. The land is forty miles\nfrom Perez, Mexico, and in touch\nwith the coast market centers. The\ntract was purchased from Miss\nJosephine L. Kendrick of JNew\nYork who had inherited the prop\nerty.\nMANUEL Y. LOAIZA\nAgricultural Implements Wagons, Spring Vehicles\nIMPORTING AGENT\nAcexcy JOHN DEERE PLOW CO.\nCOMEKCIO A RlVA\nLJ ti Tiui'li'di Mmin. f KKENTK A I.A Krta- r I.\nriermosillo uw-i-.o. u. m. 70 vjuaytnas Cion-p,o.b.no. m Uiliacah pai.acio-p.o.b. 86\nGEO. B. MARSH, Inc.\n(ESTABLISHED 1890)\nSTOVES AND RANGES, HARDWARE, PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, WALL\nPAPER, CARPETS, ETC. FURNITURE AND HOUSE FURNISHINGS.\nFORWARDING AGENT\nFOR MEXICO\nUNDERTAKER AND\nEMBALM ER\nNOGALES, ARIZONA\nLEARN ABOUT THE\nYAQUI RIVER VALLEY\nLANDS FOR FARMING AND GRAZING\nRICHARDSON CONSTRUCTION COMPANY\n5 NASSAU ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 710 LANKERSHIM BLDC, LOS ANGELES, CAL.\nESPERANZA, R. Y. S0N0RA, MEXICO\nBrickwood House\nJ. T. Brickwood, Proprietor\nFIRST GLASS IN EVERY RESPECT\nNicelu Furnisbed Rooms. Prices Moderate\n5\nNOGALES\nARIZONA\nClothing for the poor will be\nthankfully received by the Sisters of\nMercy at bt. Joseph's Hospital.\nTHE O. K.\nBARBER SHOP\nIS THE PLACE to go to enjoy a pleasant\nshave or a first class hair cut. Call at\nthe 0. K. Bath Rooms. I am here to\nplease you.\nM. HENDRICKS, Proprietor\nGeo. Psomas\nFRUIT CO.\nWe carry a full line of\nFancy and Staple Gro\nceries, Hay and Grain.\nso\nT\nRobinson Boots y linos, f\n1\nESTABLISHED 1856.\nI ALAMOS, SONORA, MEXICO. 1\nTRY OUR LINE OF LUNCH GOODS\nconsisting of Boiled Ham, Sausage of all\nkinds, Crackers, Smoked and Salt Fish,\nTotato Chips.\n'N THE DELICATESSEN LINE\nwe have Freeh Fruits, Fresh Vegetables,\nFicklfcs, Sauerkraut, Bulk Olives, Fresh\nFish and Oysters.\nWE CARRY ALSO a lull line of Candies,\nTobaccos, etc.\nPHONE MAIN 121, NOGALES, ARIZONA\nGeneral Merchandise\n11 Mi\nIII ; ftCSwj iM-yi)\na\n0\nDry Goods, Boots and Shoes,\nGroceries, Hay, Grain, Flour,\nEtc. Liquors. Family Trade\nSupplied.\nA (rents for the Fnmoua\nMONARCH BRAND\nFancy Conned and\nBottled Goods.\nNOGALES, ARIZONA\ntime when it was pointed directly", 
      "batch": "batch_az_fairyduster_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "oasis.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85032933/1911-01-14/ed-1/seq-11.json", 
      "place": [
        "Arizona--Cochise--Benson", 
        "Arizona--Pinal--Arizola", 
        "Arizona--Santa Cruz--Nogales"
      ], 
      "page": ""
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 16, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1926-09-30/ed-1/seq-16/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19260930", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "16\nDEMOCRATS ANNOUNCE\nMONTGOMERY CHOICES\nJDelegateship Names Include\nCharles P. Johnson, James M.\nMount and Mi\u2019s. G. Stevens.\n\u2022Pf'tal Plfpatch to Tho Star\nROCKVILLE, Aid.. September 30. \u2014\nAnnouncement was made by the\nDemocratic State central committee\nyesterday of a number of candidates\n\u201c I MmsSsvEM. Sate\nSlUtiS at KaufmaimV\nfor the Living Room\nDrastic Reductions for Quick Clearance of Floor Samples\nThe famous PULLMAN Bed- D 1 j\nCavenpon. Covered witK 2 Incomplete Suites and Discontinued Odd Pieces\nBaker Cut Velour. Daven- | [VI y\" 1\nport opens into full sire bed. i ill/Tr mdmdfJ I tj *Clf f 11 T l /\u2122ti p\nLlere is a oale or many surprises tor the thrifty buyer; genuine Character Furniture at tremen\n3-piece suite covered in ip 11 dous Savings. It is due to the Kaufmann policy of showing new stocks monthly; so all that remains\ndamask a ** J of earlier Samples MUST GO AT GREAT DISCOUNTS. And we have included also some very\nframe. S FuIl web construe- l\\[o'l47\u2018 $1 new arrivals \u2014suites that lack one of the pieces. And with these a wide assortment of odd pieces\u2014a\ntion - 11 tt 3-\u00a3dZr very limited number of each.\nRegul.rly J 229 '/^l''\nRKOI ( HONS ON NEW \" Character 889 ' mVf A Hu\nbedroom suites p rir mffis&t flgfg lt\nA NEW suite of decorated Wal-\nnut and Gum. Full-sne Vanity; {OQO\nBow-end Bed, Highboy and mdfjmd 1 ) |jl 1 /SST 9 .-ISIT II /ba IB\nD \u2014 ViiM Jlmipgffjliir\nA NEW suite of Walnut veneer, wm 'l\\ J|\nThe workmanship that you find 111 |B| _ 11 '\nin furniture priced much higher. i r \u25a0rfiN&fta ii t- ial\\ S -s\nPearl - trimmed drawer pulls. Four pieces. j| II B W\nA NEW suite. Walnut and Gum. -\u25a0 / \\ (Sk\nPainted floral designs add to $J_ JJQ OF W\nheauty. Senn Vamty . Dresser. We have forgotten costs in pricing these. There\nChest ot Drawers and bed. _ are ,'ust a few of each\u2014the reward for early shopmntf\nYOU CAN BUY THEM ON\nTHE BUDGET nM New Arrivals in DINING ROOM Furniture ' S2S 'J&is&IB '\n__\u00ab___ t Q i\u00ab t TB \u2022 stands and silk shades.\nif your home Startling Low Prices Eleven in Mahogany I I\nRFADY i \u2022 i a . , , END finish. Turned legs and Q Q^L\n1 lllJ ion must see them to appreciate what wonderful values TABLES odd-shaped bottom shelf \u2022)\nKaufmann s will store the they are l Neiv\u2014every suite reflects the latest style trend . 'They goat \u2014 1\nFurniture you select and Special values, indeed! to begin the Fall season at Well made and real\ndeliver when you are ready, Kaufmann\u2019s. LAYER FELT values at the usual Q\nwithout charge. . MATTRESSES price of $14.75.\nA NEW suite of 10 Pieces. A NEW suite of William and -\u25a0 mm great saving at \u2014\nEarly English design. Amer- d\u00bb \"fl Mary design. 10 pieces. Built $ I\nican Walnut, with decorated JL % \u00b0f selected Huguenot Walnut Bea Uti ful poly- r. m*\nCoiliulete BED Outfit overla y- Hardwood interiors. and Gum. Pin stripe inlay. Chair seats of BUTTET chrome decorations. fIL I \u25a0\n\u25a0 r blue Leather. \u2022 MffiRORS Some etched. Tor\nA NEW 7 suite of Spanish de- \u201d\u25a0 better homes.\nX Burled 'w 1 \u201d? T eer T A NEW S uite of French Walnut 1 Beauty and useful-\nBurled Walnut decorated with gold stripe tnlay. !|> I JjU IITIRARY HCSS for the living Os ffc *7 *\nHardwood interiors Chairs have seats of , Hardwood interiors. 10 pieces. \u00b1U7 LIBRARY .S'o m c ar \u00ab7 ej> I -\u00a3 .7 5\ngenuine Tapestry. 10 pieces. A very unusual offering. TABLES carved Just Bof J-\nKan fm aim\u2019s = s\u00a7h s * l3 - 95\nThe Home of Character Furniture . . ... l? \u2022 l ot e c tion, for \u201e m\nCEDAR your clothes\u2014and an ft 11 .l(l\nm An mm V V MM mm mm k \u00ab wAf CHESTS attractive piece of I I\n1415 H STREET N*W* iurni,Hreaswc,L\nchosen to fill vacancies on the Mont\ngomery County ticket for the Fall elec\ntion.\nFor House of Delegates Charles P.\nJohnson of Germantown, James M.\nMount of Gaithersburg and Mrs.\nGertrude M. Stevens of Chevy Chase\nwere listed. W. IT. Burdette of Da\nmascus was chosen for the county\njommissioner race in the second dis\nfric't and Wilson \\V. Hodges of Cornua\nfor commissioner in the third district..\nFor judge of the Orphans Court,\n; Howard M. C. Marlow of Colesville\nI and William C. Watkins of Rockville\nwere named. For register of .wills\nTHE EVENHHTO STAR. WASHINGTON, T). 0., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER. 30. 1926.\nThomas J. Fulks of Gaithersburg was\nchosen. Claibourne H. Mannar of\nRockville was the choice for county\nsurveyor. No one was named for the\nfifth commissioner district nor for\nclerk of the Circuit Court. It was\nsaid to be unlikely that a candidate\nfor the clerkship would be decided\nupon.\nThe committee, consisting of Paul\nSleman, chairman; F. Barnard AValsh,\nMrs. Clara Holmes, YVilson L. Town\nsend and Simon O. Smith, had been,\nholding conferences during the last\nseveral davsl\nFINDS \u201cYANKEE DOODLE\u201d\nORIGIN IN NETHERLANDS\nStudent of Archeology Says Words\nof Song Came From Old Dutch\nComposition.\nBy the Associated PreKS.\nCHEROKFIK, lowa, September 30.\nTV. I. Endicott, student of archeology\nand of languages, believes that \u201cYan\nkee Doodle\u201d originated in the Nether\nlands. He says the words of the song\ncame from \u201cY'onk Heer Doodle,\u201d ari\ni old Dutch air.\n> \"\u201cYonk Heer Doodle,\u201d Mr. Endicott\nstates, \"was intended as a contribu\ntion to annoy the yonk heers or young\n5 lords. l*i America it is supposed to\nhave been first rendered by a British\ndrum corps, largely for the purpose of\ngiving the American New Amsterdam\ncontingent a military rating founded\non ridicule. The name \u2018Yankee\u2019 is\nAmerican-Indian, a corruption of\nr _\u2018Y r onk Heer\u2019 by the aborigines who in\n\u2022 habited the vicinity of New Amster\ndam.\n\u201cThe Indians, accustomed to hear\ning the Dutch citizens greet each\nother as \u2019Yonk Heer\u2019 arrived at the\ndeduction that all white men were\n\u2018Yong Heer.\u2019 Yankee* was the best\nthey could make of it.\u201d\nPompadour's Home to Go.\nThe Chateau de la Muette, once the\nhome of Pompadour and Mm*, du\nBarry, is to be torn down to make\nway for progress in Paris. The cha\nteau is on the edge of the Bols de\nBoulogne. It has had many notable\nhistorical tenants.\nGREAT SALT LAKE RISING.\nRecords Show Increase of Volume\nin Past 25 Years.\nSALT LAKE CITY, September 30\n(>P).\u2014Great Salt Lake is rising, rath\ner than receding, records of the last\n25 years show. Salt Lake is a rem\nnant of Lake Bonneville, the vast\nprehistoric body of water which cov\nered portions of what is now Utah,\nIdaho and Nevada.\nThere are times when the shore\nline of Salt Lake, the waters of whl -h \u00a5\n' are 22 per cent solid, recedes, and '\nagain the waters will rise for a feu\ninches. However, climatic conditions\nmust change materially if the lake i;\nto dry up or spread over the wide\nspread areas it once covered.\ni #\nChinese in Siam Astir.\nChinese in Siam have suddenlv\nawakened to the fact that their chi!\ndren who are being brought up there\nare ignorant of Chinese reading,\nwriting and customs. Consequently\nChinese schools are being established", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_goodman_ver02", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1926-09-30/ed-1/seq-16.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "16"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 4, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1914-01-12/ed-1/seq-4/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19140112", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "MILITIAMEN HERE\nI FOR CONFERENCES\nProblem of Making the Guard\nMore Effective Subject of\nDiscussion.\nPAY BILL IS EXPECTED\nTO AROUSE CONTROVERSY\nState Soldiery Said to Be Opposed\nto Increased Federal\n? Control.\nImportant conferences on various prob\nlems connected with state militia organi\nzations and other civilian military bodies\nwere inaugurated here today with a meet\ning: of the national militia board. Later\nIn the day th? national board for the pro\nmotion of rifle practice, consisting of rep\nresentatives from all parts of the coun\ntry, met with Henry S. Breckenridge, as\nsistant secretary of war. Tonight a con\nference will take place between the exec\nutive committee of the National Guard\nAssociation and the adjutants general of\nthe National Guard of the several states.\nBecause of the great amount of busi\nness to be transacted some of the meet\nings probably will continue until Wednes\nday night, when the board of directors\nof the National Rifles Association will\ndiscuss measures for the encouragement\nof civilians in the use and knowledge of\nfirearms.\nTo Plan for Maneuvers.\nIt is expected that the national militia\nboard will consider such questions as\nequipment, discipline and organization of\nstate militia. Special consideration will\nbe given to the participation next sum\nmer of the National Guard with the troops\nof the regular army in joint maneuvers.\nThe mobilization of militia troops and\ntheir relation to the regula:- army in time\nof peace are among the other questions\nlikely to involve extended discussion.\nAs the Dick act. as well as the much\ncontroverted circular putting into effect\nthe organization clause, is already be\ning enforced, it is not believed that those\nmeasures will be vital issues at this\ngathering unless an attempt is made to\nbring about amendment of the meas\nure. which demands that alt state\nmilitia bodies to share federal aid must\nconform in organization and equipment\nto regular army standards.\nMeeting: Dick Law Terms.\nWar Department officials today pointed\nout that reports had been received from\nstate militia organizations throughout the\nthe country, stating that orders either\nhad been or would be issued which would\nbring the several bodies of militia troops\nunder the requirements of the Dick act.\nStates which have already issued such\norders include New Jersey, Florida,\nIdaho. Georg'a, Indiana. Iowa, Maryland.\nMissouri, Montana, Ohio, Illinois. Maine.\nOk.ahoma. Kansas and Tennessee\nStates prepared to issue similar orders\nare New Mexico, New York. Rhode\nIsland, South Carolina. Texas, Vermont,\nWashington, West Virginia, Wisconsin,\nAlabama, Delaware and Kentucky.\nBut while the Dick act and the circular\nputting it into effect may not come to\nthe front in the discussions, especially at\nthe meeting of the militia board begin\nning today and the conference of adju\ntants general tonight, a spirited contro\nversy, some officials believe, is likely in\nboth meetings when consideration of a\nmilitia pay bill is reached. Secretary\nGarrison is known not to favor any mili\ntia pay bill which does not give the\nTJnlted States a greater jurisdiction over\nthe state militia, including power to send\nthem on foreign service. Scores of militia\nofficers are known to dissent from that\nview, and it is said strenuous resistance\nof greater federal control will be made.\noneaeKanefor\nEACH U.S. BATTLESHIP!\nDirigible Balloons for Navy Also\nRecommended by Board of\ni Officers.\nEquipment of every battleship with at\nleast one aeroplane, the use by the navy\nof dirigible balloons and the concentra\ntion of all naval aeronautical training\nwork at Pensacola, Fla., are among the\nprincipal recommendations of the board\nof otficers appointed by Secretary Dan\n:els to draw up a comprehensive plan\nfor the organization of a naval aeronau\ntical service. The board's report was\nmade public today, with the announce\nment that it had been approved by the\nSecretary. It is proposed now to go\nslowly and gradually toward the de\nvelopment of the aeronautic service along\nthe lines indicated, as experience dic\ntates and funds become available.\nCollects Information Abroad.\nThe board collected a vast amount of j\ninformation from abroad, where the na- !\ntions were found to be a unit in the\nconviction that superiority is essential\nin all matters pertaining to aerial equip\nment. The idea of some powers that\ncoast defense also should be based upon\nair service was condemned, the report\ndeclaring that the United States aero\nnautical service will be adequate if\nbased upon official service with the fleet.\nThe board held that special ships for ?\naeroplane* and air craft generally would }\n?e considered, though not immediately\nrecommended. The purchase of diri-j\ngibles at the ear.iest practicable date\nwas recommended. !\n\"CHRIST CROWDED OUT.\"\nTheme of Sermon by Rev. Dr. Clark\nat Hamline Church.\n**Try to cut Christ out of your business\nand you are bound to come to grief,\" de\nclared Rev. Dr. Lucius C. Clark at the\nHamline M. E. Church last night in his\nsermon on \"Christ Crowded Out.\"\n\"Business without Christ is business1\nwithout a most essential element,\" he\nsaid. \"If you are joined merely to the\nidol of wealth or business without the\ntempering spirit of Jesus Christ, you are\ndoomed to come to sorrow and your idols\nwill perish with you. In a certain sense,\nno man possesses wealth. It merely is\n-riven to him in trust by God to use it\n'or a limited period for the betterment of\nmankind. It' Christ is crowded out in the\nmatter of the utilization of this wealth,\n?he wealth becomes not a blessing, but a\ncurse.\"\nThe sermon was the first to be delivered\n?it gospel meetings to be held throughout\nthe week. The schedule of services for the\nweek are: Tonight, \"To Work\": Tues\nday. \"To Appreciation\"; Wednesday, \"To\nFaith\"; Thursday, \"To Leadership,\" and\nFriday. \"To a Wedding.\" The opening\nhalf hour of hong will be in charge of the\nfollowing organizations: Tonight. Ladies\n\\id Societ\\ : Tuesday, Hamline Brother\nhood: Wednesday, Woman's Home Mis\nsionary Society; Thursday, Sunday\nschool, and Friday, Epworth League.\nThe Hagerstown (Md.) Board of Trade\nis conducting an accident-prevention cam\npaign. ^\nLATE FINDS IN\nARCHEOLOGY\nBy Frederic J. Haskir..\nA translation of the oldest real estate '\nmortgage in the world has just been j\nmade for President Charles W. Mark\nham of the Illinois Central railroad. The ,\nancient brick upon which the mortgage I\nwas recorded was taken a short time j\nago from Nippur, near ancient Babylon, :\nand is considered to be one of the most j\ninteresting archeological finds ever made, j\nThe brick is 2,243 years old and it is iiir ;\nscribed with the terms of a mortgage :\nupon an orchard in Babylon to secure a j\nloan made by a family of banKei*3 who, j\naccording to the inscription, financed all f\nthe big business deals of that period, in- !\neluding those made by royalty.\nTo the average person archeology is a i\ndry, uninteresting sciencc. having no )\npresent-day interest. Tt>* discovery of\nsome small record like this ancient mort- 1\nsage indicator how thoroughly the life, j\ncustoms and ha aits of the ancient races\ncorresponded with our own. Archeology '\nhas many practical sides. It furnishes;\nthe real basis for all historical knowledge\nof ancient times. 11 may also serve to I\ngive hints to the modern inventor. It is!\nwell known thai the ancients possessed j\nconveniences differing vastly from our\nown. The differences are riot always in I\nour favor. The speed and ease with j\nwhich horses were handled in olden times J\nare well established facts. Consequently\ntheir gearing and harness must have j\nbeen well adapted to the purpose. A New j\n\\ork horse owner recently paid a high!\nprioe for a set of bridles of improved pat- J\ntern guaranteed to control the horses\nwithout injuring their tender mouths. A\nfew months later he visited Pompeii.\nAmong the articles recovered there by\nthe archeologists were a number of\nbridles of precisely the same pattern as\nthose which had recently been patented\nin the United States, and which he had j\npurchased as quite the newest ideas in t\nbridles.\nt ntil recently the study of archeology I\nhas been chiefly confined to the old i\nworld. The greatest amount of excava- ?\ntion has been made in Egypt, Greece, j\nItaly and the Mediterranean, islands..\nStudies iri Switzerland, England, Scot\nland. France and other parts of Europe\nare now revealing new facts about races ?\nwhose existence had been absolutely un- i\nknown. In America the study of :\narcheology is yet in its beginning, but I\nthe ancient cities of Central America, ;\nMexico and the mountainous coast of j\nSouth America are yielding up rich\ntreasures showing the development of :\nthe earlier peoples of the western con- !\nt.nent. f\n}\n* *\nThe building of one city upon the site j\nof another has been a frequent occur- j\nrence in many ;\nCities Are Built parts of the\non Sites of Others world' In vo!\" 1\n. canic countries !\nwhere a sudden eruption was likely to ,\nsubmerge a city without warning, after\nmanner of l'ompeii and Herculaneum,\nsuch a procedure is more easily under- I\nstood than in a region where the cities :\n?ere not apt to be suddenly hidden i\nfrom View. In England and other parts I\nof Europe burled cities are not infre\nquent. Within the last three months the i\narcheological world has been especially\ninterested in the uncovering of the an- '\ncient city of Uriconium in Shropshire\nI ricon:um was built by the Romans I\nduring their occupancy of Britain. It\nwas situated on one of the principal i\nRoman roads and was undoubtedly an\nimportant center of Roman-Britain life. ?\nalthough it lias lain buried for centuries. :\nThe excavators have now completed the\ncircuit of the city, which measured about 1\nthree miles and inclosed an area of 170 <\ncolumns undf'r a rortico of six\ncolumns, is being excavated now Harts\nof two altars and some large nieces of\nstatuary are being recovered f\nu^n'Tlfe6 s'tr^Tio^'t ?TCo!\ntraced back to a lengih of feet ThS\nbuilding has many rooms' At least W\n? had hypocausts or hot air heat\ng apparatus, indicating that\nways of heating were not unknown ^\nalthough the Saxon* and\nNormans, who followed them, had not\nthe art, for their ancestral castles were\n&Ve a\nI roads. A large number of coins, ranging\n| from 23 B. C. to 392 A. D.. indicate the\n! period of this city's prosperity.\n*\n* #\n; The archeological work done in the\n! United States has not so far revealed any\nnotable de\nNorth Americans gree of civil\nNot Highly Civilieed. T'lhTalo\nriginal inhabitants are concerned. Some\nold ruins which have recently been un\nearthed in Nebraska Indicate that can\n, nibalism was practiced to a considerable\n! degree. One old hut which was excavated\nlast year under the inspection of Robert\nF. Gilder, archeologist of the State Mu\nseum of the University of Nebraska, was\nfound to be a veritable charnel house.\nThe floor was strewn with the bones of\nwomen and children, while a broken pot\nheld a number of rib bones which had\nattained a color produced bv boiling. The\npottery and other relics found in this hut\nwere crude and yet showed a certain at\ntempt at ornamentation. In Wisconsin,\nNorth Dakota and several northwestern\nstates archeological research is now be\ning carried on under the auspices of the\nstate historical societies, some archeologi\ncal organizations or by private individ\nuals.\nThe greatest impetus for work in\nAmerica is furnished by the School of\nAmerican Archeology, incorporated in\nJ 907. This school has administrative\nheadquarters in the historic old Govern\nor's Palace in Santa Fe, N. M. From\nthere it directs investigations in the\nAmerican field, and offers opportunity\nfor training and field work to students.\nExcavations and explorations are being\nconducted under its direction in Arizona,\nNew Mexico, Utah, Colorado and Central\nAmerica.\nThe work of American archeologlsts\nis almost entirely due to the influence of\nthe Archeological Institute of America,\nwhich was founded in Boston about thirty\nyears ago. Its purpose is to promote\narcheological research by founding\nschools and maintaining fellowships, by\nconducting excavations and explorations\nand by aiding those conducted by others.\nIt publishes results of the research and\nmaintains lecture courses under its affil\niated societies.\n*\ni: *\nThe archeological schools under its\nauspices are located in Rome, Athens.\nJerusalem and\nWork in China .santa Fe. in\n, addition to\nNow Contemplated. thesesteps\nwere taken at the meeting of the insti\ntute recently held in Montreal for the\nestablishment of a school in China. With\nthis in view, a preliminary archeological\nsurvey of the Chinese republic has been\nmade during the past year by Langdon\nWarner of-Boston, who recommends the\nestablishment of a school in Peking/ It\nis planned to work carefully in co-opera\ntion with the native scholars. Possible\nsites for excavation can only be selected\nwith the full consent and good will of tin\nChinese people, but temples and caves\nabove ground may be studied and rub\nbings and photographs made of Inscrip\ntions.\nThe institute is at present conducting\nexcavations and explorations at Cyrene.\nin northern Africa, under the direction\nof a number of well known archeoiogists.\nIt is also responsible for the excavations\nin Quirigua in Guatemala, conducted by\nDr. Kdgar Hewitt, the director of the\nAmerican School of Archeology at\nSanta Fe.\nJanuary Clearance Sale\nPIANOS,\nPLAYERS\nTwo \"features\" of this sale deserve\nspecial attention?\nThe few remaining Player - Pianos\nwhich we are pricing at $350 on time pay\nments of $20 down and $10 a month.\nThese are new, high-class instruments,\nand if you have examined players here\nduring the past year you have been shown\nthis make player at $450?not less.\nThe balance of our stock of Upright\nPianos tagged at $195. Selling on terms\nof $10 down and $5 a month. Every one\nan instrument formerly sold at from $27 5\nto $375.\nOf course, the Second-hand Uprights\nat $90 and upward ? the Squares at $5\neach?and the few Cabinet Players at $10\nto $20 speak for themselves. Come in\nquick and take your pick of these.\nEdmonston's\nHome of the Original\n\"FOOT FORM\" Boots for\nmen, women and children.\nEdmonston's Special Shoe Sale\nClosing Out Various Lines of\n\"Foot Form\" Boots for Men and Women.\nA splendid opportunity for you to provide your\nimmediate footwaer needs at a material saving.\n4 Lines of _ Thes? arc Foot Form\n\\\\t ^-,'0 Boots Nos- 7?7/s> 707Vix?\nWomen s 731X, 764X, in button and\n$4.00 Boots, lace, kid foxed and gun\nmetal. Stand- ^\n$3.35 ??i IT. $3.35\nWomen's Foot F?r? 2??\n(t- _ _ _ tj ^ 740, 741, 764CC and 707J4T;\ny$.00 IjOOlS, jn all leathers except patent,\ndjyi Q/\\ Standard $5.00 (T>A OA\n<p4(uU Boots at\nMen's Foot Form Boots Nos.\ni ci S70, 870X, 870P, 837, 872; in\n$4*00 &?oes, kid, gun metal, box calf and\nO A C patent. Stand- (Tj O A [T\n?pO>4u urd $4 Shoes at\nMen's $6 Shoes,\n$4.85\n6 L:nes of\nWomen's\n$4.50 Boots,\n$3.85\nWomen's\n$6.00. Boots,\n$4.85\nFoot Form Boots Nos.\n764^(3, 707P, 707CP, 765P,\n765G, 731 l/2C, 707X, 764XP,\n731X; in kidskin, patent\nleather kid tip and cloth top,\ngun metal and mat kid.\nStandard $4.50 (f') OT\nBoots at...... vp3.o!>\nBroken lines of Boots in\nblack r u s s i a n , kidskin,\npatent leather and tan calf.\nStandard\nBoots at.\n-aiiici <iiiu ian can.\n?? $4.85\nFoot Form Boots Nos.\n860XX, 862XX, 86s^XX\n$>.00 Shoes, and 857 in kid, gun metal\nand calf.\nStandard $5.00\nBoots at\nMen's\n$4.10\nFoot Form Boots 820XX and 828XX, in kid, with /I O C\"\nsingle and double soles. Standard $6 Shoes at ?.03\nL\nEDMONSTON & CO., 1334 F Street\nAdvisers and Authorities on All Foot Troubles.\nDEATH CLAIMS MBS. BULLOCK.\nFormerly Active and Held National\nOffice in the D. A. K.\nMrs. Elizabeth Towson Bullock, widow\nof Rev-.* Dr. Joseph James Bullock, one\ntime chaplain of the Senate and also once\npastor of the Franklin Street Presbyte\nrian Church of Baltimore, died at her\nresidence .at the Imperial apartments\nFriday, at the age of eighty years. Fune\nral services were held this afternoon at\nher late residence. Rev. Andrew R. Bird\nof the Second Presbyterian Church, offi\nciating. Interment was private.\nMrs. Bullock was born in Stafford\ncounty, Virginia. She married Fleming\nK. Lavender of Baltimore, who died dur\ning the civil war. In 1870 she married\nDr. Bullock. She was at one time active\nin D. A. R. circles, being on the national\nboard of management for four years,\ntwo as vice president general and two\nas chaplain general.\nShe was the first president of Stonewall\nJackson Chapter of the Daughters of the\nConfederacy. She was one of the found\ners of the Second Presbyterian Church\nof this city. Two sons, Fleming J. Lav\nender and T. Wingth'ld Bullock: one\ngrandson, tx>wnes Lavender: a sistt-r.\nMrs. Virginia I'. Weirick, wife of T>r.\nSamupl T. Weirick. I\". S. A., and on?\nbiother, John Odell of Maryland, survive\nher.\nEXPLAINS SPIRITUAL LAXITY.\nBev. J. T. Huddle Sayi Christians\nAre Busy With Worldly Affairs.\nThat the present apparent indifference\nof professing Christians is not realty in\ndiilerenct', but is a condition brought\nabout by reason of the fact that men and\nwomen of today are too busy * ith world\nly matters to give much attention to\nspiritual affairs, waf. the declaration of\nKev. John T. Huddle in his sermon yes\nterday at St. Paul's Lutheran Church.\nRev. Huddle was proachintr on the topic.\n?Winston Churchill's New Religion of\nPatriotism.\"\n\" It is because Christians have not coxnc\nto a realization of what it means to be\na real Christian that they are indiffe: -\nent,\" lie said. \"The cause of Christian!*\nis the greatest cauj-e in the universe?th.?\nonly work, in fact, that will have a; .\npermanent and ^t^rnal recognition. C?- >'\nbattle with evil, though it may appe;> -\ninsignitioaut, is the only thing that ii\nreally worth while. We must show ou\nown thinking, not simply accept the coi -\nelusion of another. For decades the mo\ntive of the Americans has been to ff- '.\nmoney: the idol at whose shrine we havi\nworshiped has been material suctcs?. 1 i\nthe new religion of patriotism this na -\ntive must be riianged.\"\nS. A Hoover, formerly with a Ual: ?\nmore hotel, has been employed as t' 4\nnew manager of the Ilagerstown CM<5 I\nCountry Club.\nTOloo5war5\nNew York=WAS[iINQTON=ParsSc\notbro{p\nASS Calendars R;dyc^d to 5c and 10c Each\nSale of Good Fiction, 25c the Voiume.\nIn Our Complete Third Floor Sections of\nWomen's Ready-to-Wear Apparel\nClearance Sales Are Benmig: Conducted,\nBringing the Prices of High=Qrade Garments\nDawn to the Very Lowest Figures.\nIn addition to the clearance sales, which consist of our own garments, designed and\nmade especially for us in the best fabrics, colorings and styles, we have been in the market\nduring the past week and secured several laige purchases of excellent garments, which are\nalso marked at deep concessions. Third floor, G st.\nWomen's New Tailored Suits, $12.95.\nRegular $25.0?, ?27.5? and $35.?? Qualities.\nThese are suits of the better grades. Tailored of beautiful, high\nquality fabrics, including serges, broadcloths, cheviots, diagonals,\nmatelasse and fancy novelties, in Copenhagen, brown, mahogany,\ngreen, navy blue, black, etc. The coats are lined with Skinner's satin,\nwhich is another assurance of quality, this lining never being found\nin anything but the higher-class garments; various new models in\nskirts. Sizes 14 to 49 in the assortment, but not all sizes of each\nstyle.\nOUR ENTIRE STOCK OF SUITS REDUCED AS FOLLOWS.\nU9JS=were $25>.5?. ' $39.5?=were $67.5?.\n$25>.5?=were $5?.??. ( $39.5?=were $75.0?.\n$35.??=we re $6?.??. j $62.5?=were $1??.??.\nIn these suits the very latest models are seen; the finest im\nported and domestic fabrics in a wide variety of weaves and color\nings.\nWomen's <& Misses' Dresses, $12.95o\nOriginally Sold at\n$18.5?, $25.0? and $29.5?.\nA marked reduction has been made 011 a lot of Women's and\nblisses' Dresses; they originally sold for $18.50 and S25.00. but are\nnow priced at $12.95.\nThese dresses are made in the high-waisted effect, with Man\ndarin or modified set-in sleeves, and are finished with fine embroid\nered collars and deep ruffling on sleeves. Bedford cord, wool poplins,\nplain and brocaded velvets in pretty and serviceable shades of blue\nand brown. Special price, $12.95 each.\nWomen's New Winter Coats, $12.95.\nRegularly priced at\ni? and $25.??.\nWe have collected a large number of coats, which were for\nmerly priced at. $20.00 and $25.00, and marked them at $12.95 for\nclearance. Only a few of each style, and in qualities which every\nwoman will readily see are the best. All sizes, in the new and fash\nionable fabrics, some with plush collars. Their merit has only\nto be seen to be appreciated?$12.95 each.\nA small assortment of Velour de Laine Coats, in a good shade\nof brown, with large sailor collar of fur, in belted effect with modi\nfied Mandarin sleeves; three-quarter length, trimmed with buttons;\nwere $25.00?$18.50.\nA few Velvet and Plush Coats, in black mostly, at the special\nprice of S25.00?regularly S40.00.\nPriestley's RoseberryCloth Raincoats,\nSpecial at $10.00.\nAll of Priestley's Rainproof fabrics enjoy a wide and most fav -\norable reputation for quality. Roseberry cloth is one of the best\nproduced by this firm. We have recently secured an assortment of\nthe Fine Raincoats, which have been made up by a high-grade tailor,\nresulting in an even better standard of design, quality and fit than is\ngenerally procurable. These are made in the new'spring models\nwith set-in or regulation sleeves, and shown in navy blue and tan}\nsizes up to 44.\nFur Coats at Low Prices.\n$50.00 and $60 Coats . . $25.00 $75.00 Black Pony Coats, $39.50\n$75.00 Black Pony Coats, $35.00 $45.00 White Coney Coats, $35.00\nAn unusually fine lot of Fur Coats, manufacturer's samples, which we have\nplaced on sale at very low prices. Included are Natural and White Coneys, Caracals,\nNearseals and Marmot, in lengths from 4> to 52 inches. Four of the choicest styles\nare shown?modified cutaway, straight and round fronts and extreme cutaway; all\nhave shawl collars.\nThe Savings Are th? M3st Attractive We Have Ever Offered.\nOWN STOCK\nTHE LOW\nFINE FUR\nALSO MADE REDUCTIONS IIS\nCOATS AND SETS THAT ARE EQUIVALENT\nWE HAVE MARKED THIS SPECIAL LINE\nPRICES\nSpecial Sale Women's Hosiery\nTrnmnimed Hats Tlhat\nPriced at $6.??, $8.??,\nand $!2.??=Now\nand Underwear.\nManufacturers' sample garments which\nwe acquired greatly under price, and allow\nour customers the same discount from the\nusual retail price as we received in the whole\n| sale transaction. Of course, you must expect\nthem to be slightly mussed or soiled, but of\n[perfect quality.\nVests, Drawers and Combinations, vari\nious styles, at the extremely low prices of\n19c, 25c and 37%c garment,\ny2 and Yi less than regularly.\nBlack* and White Lisle Thread Hose,\nwith plain or lace ankles; 100 dozen pairs in\nthe lot.\n25c pair.\nRegularly 35c and 5?c.\nMain floor, G st.\nJanuary Special Values in\nWool-filled Bed Comfortables\nSEVERAL HUNDRED OF THESE FINE WOOL-FILLED\nBED COMFORTABLES ARE PRICED GREATLY BELOW\nREAL WORTH IN THIS JANUARY SALE.\n100 Lamb's Wool Filled Comfortables, covered with nainsook.\nSpecial price, $4.5? each.\n100 Lamb's Wool-filled Comfortables, covered with silk mous\nseline. Special price, $5.75 each.\nAlso 200 Cotton-filled Comfortables, with attractive coverings\nSpecial price, $2.0? each..\nEntire regular stock of Beautiful Silk and Satin-covered Wool\nfilled Comfortables; reduced to $10.00, S12.50. $13.00. S16.00 and\n$18.00 each; were $15.00 to $28.00.\nSecond floor, F st. Bnlldinf\"\nFor Final Clearance\nof Millinery.\n$3.00 and\n$5.00 Each.\nThese hats must be disposed\nof without delay. They are all\ngood styles and of velvets,\nplushes and felts, shaped and\ntrimmed in a wide variety of\nmodels, and in shades of eminent\ngood taste and refinement.\n$3.?? and $5.0? for choice.\nThird floor, F st.\nSpecial Values ira\niWoman's Nightgowns, Lin\ngerie Wahts a^id Towels\nStamped for Embroidering.\nBest quality materials in a variety of ef\nfective designs. Especially timely values in\nthe'interest of women who handwork their\nsummer garments now.\nNightgowns, ready made and stamped on\nnainsook, 75c each.\nNightgowns, ready made and stamped on flr.o\nnainsook, in six new and original designs, 00c ea- i.\nLingerie Shirt Waists, stamped on crepo voile,\nwith sufficient materials for working, 50c each\nLinen Towels, stamped for embroidering: full\nsize; scalloped stamped ends. Usually marked 75\nspecial price, 50c each.\nSecond floor, center.\nThe^Lilv Ano\" Brassieres.\nThe Lily Ann Brassieres are made\nwith invisible shield holder, the bodv\nbeing of a very substantial qualitv of\nnet, and the short sleeves of invisible\nnet, fitted with shields that are war\nranted.\n$1.25 each.\nNotion Department, Main floor, G m.\nNew Dress Boots for Women\noff the Latest Correct Type.\nATTENTION IS DIRECTED TO FOUR VERY HANDSOM K\nMODELS WHICH WE HAVE TUST RE\nCEIVED, AS FOLLOWS:\nPatent Coltskin Button Boots, with dull mat kidskin tops, me\ndium high cut with light welt soles, and leather Ctfban heels.\nPatent Coltskin Button Boots, with black silk-finished crave: -\nette cloth top; welt soles and leather Cuban heels.\nPatent Kidskin Button Boots; black brocaded silk topping:\nwhole quarter pattern; medium high with light welt soles and new\nSpanish Louie heel.\nPatent Kidskin Button Boots; dull mat kidskin top; whole\nquarter pattern; plain toe model, with Spanish Louie heel.\nnew models; priced at $6.0? pair.\nThird floor. Tenth st.\n.Woodward\n& LotUjrop.", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_quarren_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1914-01-12/ed-1/seq-4.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "4"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 23, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1928-12-30/ed-1/seq-23/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19281230", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "CHACO CLAIMS ARE BASED\nON TITLE AND POSSESSION\nBolivian Contentions Stress Historical\nDocuments While Paraguay Holds\nto Occupation Arguments.\nBOLIVIA and Paraguay, who now\nare at odds, are truly sisters\nnations. In certain respects they\nare more alike than any two\nother Latin American republics.\nSituated, the one on the western, the\nother on the eastern, portions of South\nAmerica, they share the fate of being\ninland countries with no direct\naccess to the sea. with no coast\nline. They have also in common the\nfact that, having been warred upon by\nneighbors, they have lost a great por\ntion of their respective territories, the\nvalor of their population proving of no\navail. And because of these things it\nshould be only natural for them to draw\ntogether. That, however, has not been\nthe case, as between them there is an I\nold dispute, already half a century old. j\nbearing on the possession of a vast ter\nritory, El Chaco Boreal, that lies be\ntween the two countries.\nThe territory that Bolivia and Para\nguay dispute embraces, according to\nthe Bolivian internationalist Miguel\nMercado, somewhat over 12.000 square\nleagues. It is situated in the most fer\ntile region of the southern continent, a\nregion not unlike the Valley of the\nEuphrates, and much larger.\nChaco Boreal is three times larger\nthan Portugal, five times the size of\nBelgium and Switzerland together,\nfour times as large as Denmark and\nHolland taken as a unit, twice the size\nof Uruguay, almost as large as the five\nrepublics of Central America, and of\n\u00ab,n even size with Italy and Great Brit\nain. It covers one-fourth of the area\nof Bolivia and is one-half as large as\nall Paraguay.\nHas Shape of Triangle.\nIt has the shape of an isosceles tri\nfcngie. its apex ai. Asuncion, Paraguay's\ncapital, and Its sides running along the\nrivers Paraguay and Pilcomayo, which\nare its natural boundaries. The Para\nguay River divides it from Paraguay,\nthe Pilcomayo from the Argentine Re\npublic. As it slopes toward the Para\nguay River Basin it is watered by many\nan affluent of this large stream. Chief\namong these is the southern arm of the\nPilcomayo, navigable for some 250 kilo\nmeters. as from the Paraguayan Fort\nGen. Burguez (founded in 1920) down\nstream to where it merges its waters\nwith those of the Paraguay River; Con\nfuso. that springs north of the Estero\nde Patino, navigable a considerable\ndistance by small craft; Aguaray Guazu,\nnavigable by small craft for some 150\nkilometers; Monte Lindo, that springs\nby the Bolivian Fort Saavedra; Negro,\nthat has its source by the evangelical\nmission ai Macklaw r aya and runs for\nsome 160 kilometers to Concepcion,\nwhere it joins the Paraguay; Verde, a\nStream of peculiar bitter water that\nkss its source by Fort Arce, and the\nwsser streams of San Carlos and Gon\n\u25a0ales and the Galvan, that flows into\nIhe Paraguay south of Port Sastre. To\nthis water system there must be added\nthe large pools and long inlets formed\non its western bank by the Paraguay\nRiver when it floods.\nRich in Soil and Forest.\nIn. this territory a population of\n30,000,000 could be at ease. It is an\nimmense reservoir of resources. Mea\n*erly populated now, it is none the less\na powerful asset. The benignity of its\nclimate, its natural irrigation facilities,\nthe richness of its soil and subsoil, the\nwealth of its virgin forest, thick woods,\nmake of it a land of veritable promise\nR>r the mankind that lives a stifled :\nIne in an overcrowded world. j\nBolivia\u2019s grounds for claiming title to\nthe territory involved are as follows: |\nThe Audiencia of Charcas, which on\nbecoming an independent country was\ntransformed into the Republic of Bolivia,\nwas founded by the Spanish conquerors\nIn the sixteenth century as covering a\nterritory of round proportions with its\ncenter at Chuquisaca and extending cir\ncularly for a hundred leagues (300\nmiles) about this center.\nBy Royal Charter (Cedula Real) of\nAugust 29, 1563, His Magesty Philip II\ngranted to the Audiencia de Charcas\nthe lands that had been explored by\nAndreas Marzo and Nunez de Chaves\n\"together with whatever other lands\nmay be settled in those parts.\u201d It is\nthis region, lying like a wedge between\nthe Pilcomayo and Paraguay Rivers, \u2022\nthat Paraguay disputes Bolivia.\nRuling by Monarch.\nOn December 10 of the same year.\n1563, the Spanish monarch definitely\nruled that the entire Chaco region be\nlonged to the Real Audiencia de\nCharcas, fixing the boundaries of this\ndominion of the Spanish crown on the\nsouth by the entire course of the\nPicomayo River and on the north by\nthe lands of the Portuguese crown, now\nBrazil. So that, w r hat now constitutes\nParaguay proper as well as the disputed\nterritory, were under the jurisdiction\nand were judged to belong to the\nAudiencia de Charcas.\nFurther evidence is given by the fact\n\u2022hat by virtue of the royal charter of\nOctober 1, 1566, the King denied au\nthority to Commandant Francisco Ortiz\nde Vergara to explore either Chaco or\nGuaray (as what is now Paraguay was\nthen called) based the royal action on\nthe fact that these provinces were\nalready under the domain of the\nAudiencia de Charcas could not be\nproper lands for exploration on which\nto base claims looking forward to grants.\nCharcas constituted an Immense\ndomain. It soon became evident that\nto kpep order within all its confines\nwas a difficult matter. The revolt of\nthe Indians presented a grave prob\nlem. The Guaycuru and Payagua\nIndians, now the republic of Paraguay,\nwere especially restless and troublesome.\nIn order to better defend that out\nlying province of the Audiencia de\nCharcas, Guayra was made into\nGobemacion, or seat of government,\nenjoying a certain measure of autonomy\nIn order to better meet emergencies.\nThe jurisdiction of this new govern\nment did not extend at any time over\nthe Chaco region, and a provision to\nthis effect was definitely stipulated in\nthe royal charter of December 16, 1617.\nJurisdiction Assigned.\nIn 1661 the Gobernacion de Guayra,\nWhich comprised four cities, was re\nleased from the jurisdiction of Charcas\nand assigned under the Audipncia de\nBuenos Aires. The province of Chaco,\nthen a deserted region, remained under\nthe jurisdiction of the Chuquisaca\ngovernment as an integral part of the\nAudiencia de Charcas. Among many\nproofs of this fact it is pertinent to cite\nIhe royal charter of December 17,\n1743. wherein affirmed by royal author\nity that \u201cAll nations or portions there\nof that are between the Philcomayo\nand Paraguay Rivers extending beyond\nthe community of Santa Cuz de la\nSierra, do belong to Charcas.\u201d This\nregion described by the King is pre\ncisely the land which Paraguay now\nclaims.\nBesides the innumerable documents\nemanating from the Spanish crown,\nwhich Bolivia presents in her defense,\nthere exist also many opinions from\npersonages of the time, the impartial\nviews of authorative men, all of them\nfavorable to Bolivia\u2019s cause, among\nwhich we make note herein of a few\nof the most important ones.\nDon Felix de Azara, a renowned his\ntorian, cosmographer of fame and\nlearned naturalist, was appointed by\nH. M. Carlos 111 of Spain as commissar\nto define the boundaries between the\nSpanish and the Portuguese possessions\nIn America. This illustrious savant re\nmained nine and a half years in\nParaguay, given entirely to his work,\nAnd among his works he published a\nmap in which the great Azara says:\n\"The boundary of Paraguay to the\nkest Is the same River Paraguay, it\nRavine no possession in Chaco.\u201d\niiHhe work entitled \u201cHia Voyages\u201d\n] by this authoritative writer, Azara as\nj serts the following: \u201cThe boundaries of\nChaco are very broad, but despite its\nnearness to Paraguay, this government\ndoes not possess any portion in that\nterritory.\u201d And this was a true fact so\nacknowledged that it was no obstacle\nagainst the granting to Azara by the\nmunicipal government of Asuncion, as\na reward for the work mentioned, the\ntitle of \u201cIllustrious Paraguayan,\u201d not\nonly showing gratitude thereby, but\nalso, as is quite evident, evincing its\nconformity with what was stated in\nthe learned book.\nJuan Francisco de Aguirre, demar\ncator of boundaries for the possessions\nof Spain and Portugal in America, af\nfirms in his diary that \u201cthe jurisdiction\nof Paraguay as a government extends\n* * * to the west up to the settle\nment of certain Spanish provinces, a\nconsiderable extension of wild land,\nwhich is the Great Chaco, the border of\nwhich is the western bank of the Para\nguay River.\u201d\nAnd it is well to bear in mind also\nthe opinions to the same effect with\nregard to the boundaries between Par\naguay and Chaco, expressed with full\nknowledge of the case by witnesses as\ntrustworthy as Julio R. de Cesar, Cosme\nBueno, Fray Inocencio Canete, Lidan y\nCisneros, Father Guevara and Antonio\nAlcedo. who in the course of centuries\nhave had occasion to refer to the boun\ndaries of the Province of Paraguay.\nAudiencia Incorporated.\nFinally, when Buenos Aires, by Royal\ncharter of June 14. 1777, was constituted\na Viceroyalty, the Audiencia de Charcas\nwas incorporated therein as including\nall the \u201cCorregimientos\u201d (districts\nunder a Corregidor), townships and\nterritories over which its jurisdiction\nextended as from 1563, forming a single\nundivided unit within the new colonial\norganization. And as such a unit it\nremained until 1810. When the proper\narea of each new country formed from\nthe former vast empire of Spain was con\nsidered, by common consent of all the\nnew States, the \u201culti-possidetis juris\u201d as\nof 1810 was accepted as final basis. In\nother words, each new country was to\ncomprise the land which belonged to its\ncolonial unit in 1810. In 1810 Chaco\nwas an integral part and parcel of the\nAudiencia of Charcas, and when the\nAudiencia of Charcas was constituted\nas the Republic of Bolivia by the uti\npossidetis just explained, the new state\nthat took for its name that of the great\nliberator was conceived and exercising\nits new sovereignty over Chaco. So\nBolivians hold that the Chaco province\nrightfully belongs to them.\nParaguay\u2019s side in the controversy Is\nthus presented:\n\u201cOn the western side of the Paraguay\nRiver extends a vast territory, several\nthousand square miles, says President\nGuggiari of Paraguay, this territory be\ning. since colonial days, a part of the\njurisdiction of the government of Asun\ncion.\u201d\nExecutive Explains.\nTo explain this, the Paraguayan Ex\necutive adds: \u201cAsuncion, as capital of\nthe Province of Paraguay, was the most\nimportant colonization nucleus of all\ndistricts adjoining the river of the same\nname. It was in Ascuncion, therefore,\nthat the Spaniards concentrated their\nefforts to dominate the neighboring\nregions, including Gran Chaco. When\nindependence was attained, the terri\ntory of Gran Chaco naturally became a\npart of the territorial estate of the new\nRepublic of Paraguay, which inherited 1\nthe Spanish Province of Paraguay.\u201d <\nAnd to prove it, Paraguayans adduce 1\nthe arbitrational decision given out by \u2019\nPresident Hayes of the United States in\n1870, deciding that the part of the\nGran Chaco extending to the north of\nAscuncion belonged solely to Paraguay,\nand thus defeating the supposed rights\nclaimed by the Argentine, government\nover that territory.\nBolivia inherited the Spanish prov\nince of High Peru\u2014states the Para\nguayan viewpoint\u2014adjoining the bor\nder of Paraguay, precisely at the\nnorthern edge of Gran Chaco. The\nboundaries between the provinces had\nnot been properly outlined. The ter\nritorial boundaries of the colonial era\nwere somewhat vague, and remained so\nafter independence was gained. To\neliminate this impression of uncertain\nty Paraguay and Bolivia signed three\nboundary treaties from 1879 to 1894,\nwhich were not ratified later for sev\neral reasons. In all three treaties,\nParaguay and Bolivia referred to the\nquestion as \u201ca demarcation of boun\ndaries.\u201d It was never, in any sense,\nconsidered a matter affecting the dom\nination of Gran Chaco, whose Para\nguayan ownership was never doubted.\nSuch is the Paraguyan contention.\nClaim Based on Possession.\nEven though legal titles and historical\ndocuments are the real grounds for the\nBolivians claiming ownership to the\nprovince in question, the Paraguayan\nclaim is based on possession. Paraguay,\nbecause of her proximity to the Chaco\nterritory, her easy access and commu\nnication with it and its adaptability to\nher living conditions, established her\nself in the Chaco province long before\nthe Bolivians ever thought of asserting\ntitle to it. The Paraguayans were the\nfirst to explore and establish them\nselves in it. They have, for the past\ncentury, brought civilization to it.\nThese are the principal reasons upon\nwhich Paraguay bases her claim to the\ndisputed territory. In addition to this,\nin the course of the controversy and in\nvarious treaties that have been signed,\nBolivia to a certain extent recognized\nParaguay\u2019s possession of part of the\nChaco province, and although none of\nthese treaties is now in effect, this has\nsufficed, according to the Paraguayan\ncontention, to justify her claim of own\nership over the territory under dispute.\nLion Steak Popular\nDish in London Cases\nLion steak is now the most fashion\nable dish in the exclusive London res\ntaurants. It is not on the menu yet,\nbut enterprising restaurant managers\nhave ordered from big-game hunters in\nSouth Africa a couple of lions.\nThey are being sent to England in the\nsame way that beef comes from Aus\ntralia and will be on the menu on Janu\nary 1 or so. This new T fashion of eat\ning lion has been established by the\nduke of Gloucester, who shot his first\nlion during his recent trip to central\nAfrica.\nThe flesh of the king of animals was\ncut up by the natives to be used as meat\nand the duke received the choice morsel\n\u2014a lion chop. He looked at it doubt\nfully and attacked it gingerly, but find\ning it unexpectedly good continued to\neat it with a wholesome appetite. He\nadmitted later that it was nicer than\nthe best veal he had ever tasted.\n-\nFirst Angora Hotel\nWill Be Constructed\nAngora, Asiatic capital of Turkey, will\ni now offer good accommodations to trav\n\u2019 elers in the form of a big hotel under\n' French management. Lodging until\ni recent years has been such that when\n; the actress Cecile Sorel, on a tour in\n\u25a0 Constantinople, was requested by Presi\ni dent Mustapha Kemal Pasha to visit\n, him in Angora, and she asked where\ni she would put up, his only possible sug\ngestion was that she remain in the\n* sleeping car. But as the car was not\n\u2022 immune from insects, the fastidious\nactress found an excuse to stay in Con\n\u2019 stantinople.\nTHE SUNDAY STAR, WASHINGTON*, D. C., DECEMBER 30. 1928\u2014PART ?.\nWhat Boulder Dam Means\nGigantic Engineering Project, Which W ill Cost $176,000,000, W ill Be of Untold Benefit to Mankind\nBY WILLIAM A. MILLEN.\nTHE Prospero of engineering will\nwave his magic wand and by\n1936, if all goes well, the much\nmooted dam in Black Canyon,\non the Colorado River near the\nArizona-Nevada line, will be a reality,\nfurnishing power and impounded water\nfor irrigation projects, controlling the\nfurious floods that sweep down through\nthe primeval volcanic valleys and func\ntioning in unison with an All-Americgn\ncanal that will furnsh verdure and fer\ntility to the windswept desert country\njust north of Mexico.\nThe spectacular feature of it aM will\nbe the erection of a dam towering aloft\nas high as the Washington Monument,\nthe greatest dam of its kind in all the\nworld, after the Colorado River has\nbeen literally turned as:de from its nat\nural course and diverted through four\nhuge tunnels cut in the living rock just\nbeyond the canyon walls to. permit of\nthe dam\u2019s construction.\nOnly Groundwork Laid.\nThis engineering achievement, com\nparable to the Panama Canal, will be at\ntained only after a series of mighty es-\u00bb\nforts, for in signing the long-fought\nBoulder Canyon bill President Coolidge\nhas but laid the groundwork for the\npretentious project. To President-elect\nHoover will fall tho task of seeing that\nthe plan reaches fruition, and. engineer\nthat he is. the construction of this giant\ndam in Black Canyon will doubtless be\none of the monuments of his adminis\ntration.\nSeveral important steps remain to be\naccomplished before the first stick of\ndynamite is set off or the first overall\nclad workman begins his lowly task\nthat will mean another engineering tri\numph for America. The Star asked Dr.\nEl wood Mead, Commissioner of Recla\nmation of the Interior Department, to\noutline the steps ahead, for this genial\nCalifornian will have much to do with\nthe construction, if Mr. Hoover retains\nhim in that post, as he is expected\nto do.\nMust Ratify Agreement.\n\"Six of the seven States in the Colo\nrado River basin\u2014Utah, Nevada, Colo\nrado, New Mexico, Wyoming, Arizona\nand California-r-must ratify the agree\nment,\u201d Dr. Mead said, \u201cand bids for\nThe Story the Week Has Told\nBY HENRY W. BUNN.\nGERMANY.\u2014 Blessings of the Ger\nman republic! The new German ar\nchitecture cultivates simplicity, eschew\ning the preposterous grandiosity and\nmedievalism of the imperial days. A\nprominent German architect observes,\nno doubt correctly, that the change\nreflects a happy psychological change\nin the German people. And here's a\nhint for American architects. The\nGerman architects are making a prime\nconsideration of the aerial aspect of a\nbuilding or architectural group. Chi\nnese and Japanese cities show fairest as\nviewed from above. American cities?\nIt is to shudder.\nThe German republican government\nhas shown singuarly good taste in its\nchoice of portrait-heads for its postage\nstamps; as: For the 3 and 25 pfennig\nstamps. Goethe; for the 8 and 20 pfen\nnig, Beethoven; for the 5-pfennig,\nSchiller; for the 10-pfennig, Frederick\nthe Great; for the 15-pfennig, Kant;\nfor the 30-pfennig, Lessing; for the 40-\npfennig, Leibnitz; for the 60-pfennig,\nVirchow, and for the 80-pfennig, Due\nro. A magnificent company; but\nwould not Beethoven\u2019s massive front\nmore appropriately appear on an Aus\ntrian stamp?\nGerman beer production is up to 75\nper cent of pre-war, Munich continu\ning queen of malt. There are about\n6,500 breweries in Germany, while some\n25,000 households brew their own beer.\nA commission of verification and con\nciliation is to take the place of allied\ntroops when all of the latter have been\nmoved out of the Rhineland.\n** * *\nITALY.\u2014The total of enrollment of\nthe several Fascist organizations is,\n6,815,000.\nThe Fascist party proper comprises\n1,027,000 full-fledged man members and\n88.000 women in nearly the same Select\ncategory (but they haven\u2019t the vote),\n66,000 \u201cYoung Italians,\u201d 366,000 \u201cLittle\nItalians\u201d and 17,000 members of the\n\u201cuniversity group\u201d\u2014in all, 1,564,000. I\nconfess I do not understand the clas\nsifications.\nThen there is the Avanguardista, or\norganization of Fascist youths on mili\ntary lines, numbering 325,000, and the\nBalilla, or organization of. Fascist boys,\nnumbering 781,000. Finally, there are\n3.577,000 members of syndicate con\nfederations and 568,G00 members of\nother associations afllUated to the party.\nTo summarize, there are nearly\n7,000,000 Simon-pure Fascists, near-\nFascists and Fascists of sorts.\nPremier Mussolini now h:lds 7 of the\n13 portfolios in the Italian cabinet\u2014\n; namely, those \u00abf foreign affairs, in\nternal affairs, ?\u201ermy, navy, aeronautics,\ncorporations colonies.\n** * *\nCHINA.\u2014yn constructing the govern\nment which is to serve China over Sun.\n1 Yat-Sen\u2019s /period of tutelage, the Na\n; tionalists have taken leaves out of the\n> books of both Lenin and Mussolini.\n\u25a0 The government is centralized and self\nperpehiating. The optimists will see\nSpj\u00ab \u25a0gp-'y, ..... v , ~\nSITE OF THE PROPOSED BOULDER DAM AND ENGINEER\u2019S CON\nCEPTION OF HOW IT WOULD APPEAR. ITS HEIGHT IS COM\nPARED WITH THAT OF THE WASHINGTON MONUMENT, THE\nMONUMENT BEING 555 FEET AND THE DAM 560.\npower invited and satisfactory bids re\nceived that will insure the cost of the\ndam, less $25,000,000 for flood protec\ntion. These preliminary steps will take\nthe best part of a year.\n\u201cThe engineering features that re\nquire study in the future are the best\nway to utilize the water for irrigation\nin the coming years. We will have to\nstart making surveys as how best to use\nthe water in Arizona and California,\nand the act also provides for a study of\nthe country above the dam.\u201d\nAs the Legislatures of the seven\nStates intimately concerned are sched\nuled to meet in the immediate future\nthey will be given an opportunity to\npass on this important question. Con\ngress, in the legislation, has allotted sLx\nin the new arrangement an interim\nphase only, and will credit the group\nin power with the earnest desire to\nhasten the preparation of the people\nfor representative government; the\npessimists see a fresh embodiment of\nthe principle of autocracy, a richer ir\nrigation from the inexhaustible celestial\nMusic Is Medicine\nBY BRVCE BARTON.\nILIKE grand opera music, and\ndislike grand opera. In the\nfirst place, grand opera costs\ntoo much.\nIn the second place, it seems\nto me a hybrid art. Acting and\nsinging no more belong together\n\u2014for. me\u2014than reading and\ndancing. The acting of a play\nor the narration of a story car\nries me along with it. I can\nsurrender myself to the illusion:\nidentify myself with the charac\nters and forget everything in my\ninterest in their affairs.\nBut it is simply beyond me to\nfeel any illusion concerning a\nlove scene between two sup\nposedly passionate young lovers\nwhen the parts are sung by a\nburly Italian man and a burly\nGerman woman, both over 40\nyears old and more than 40\nstone in weight.\nThe only way I can enjoy the\nacting of opera is to close my\neyes.\nFurthermore, I like to be able\nto start my opera and stop it\nwhen I want to; to smoke if I\nlike, or lie down if I like; and,\nfinally, to be able to leave when\nI get ready, without feeling that\nI am losing any money by doing\nso.\nIn other words, I like my\nopera on a machine.\nMusic is not merely entertain\nment: it is medicine.\nPythagoras, who lived many\nhundred years ago, discovered\nthat. He was able to work\nwonders in cases of violent in\nsanity with no other remedy\nthan soothing music.\nGladstone, attacked by occa\nsional periods of nervous ex\nhaustion, would have his favorite\nhymns sung to him.\nHerbert Spencer, when neural-\ngia shot him through, lay down\n, and ordered soft music played,\nand invariably obtained relief.\n\u2019 v (Copyright, 1928.)\n) __ __ ___ . . .... k\nmonths for six of the seven States to\nextend their co-operation.\n\u201cThe engineering difficulties are all\ninvolved in putting in the foundation.\u201d\nDr. Mead, who is an engineer himself,\npointed out. \u201cThere will have to be a\ncofferdam placed in the stream that\nwill deflect the water out of the chan\nnel into four tunnels to be built to carry\nthe waters of the Colorado River\naround the dam site during construc\ntion. Another cofferdam will be built\nbelow to prevent the water from back\ning up, and thus a pool will be formed\nbetween the two cofferdams. Out of\nthis pool the water will be pumped.\n\u201cThe four tunnels, two on each side\nof the canyon, will be 50 feet in diame\nter and will be started above the upper\nfount of political corruption. Let us\nhope for the best.\nLet us wish a great future to the\nNational Research Institute, on the\nmodel of our Smithsonian, recently es\ntablished by the Nationalist government.\nThe Smithsonian is to co-operate cor\ndially with the new foundation, which\nAnd I, in my humble fashion,\nhave the same experience.\nI like to go home in the eve\nning before dinner, and lie down\nfor half an hour and listen to\nmy favorite music.\nMusic is a mental and spiritual\nmassage, or a bracing cold\nshower bath, according to what\nyou select. I personally do not\ncare to take my spiritual mas\nsage in the Metropolitan Opera\nHouse, any more than I would\ncare to have my hair cut in\nMadison Square Garden.\nEvery child should grow up in\na home where music is constant\nly played. Every experience of\na happy youth should have some\noarticular song bound up with\nit, so that the playing of that\nsong in after life will reawaken\nthat experience and cause it to\nbe lived again.\nI can never hear Handel\u2019s\n\"Largo\u201d without living over one\nof the quiet Sundays of my boy\nhood, because it was played in\nour house almost every Sunday.\n\u201cSweet Alice, Ben Bolt,\u201d brings\nback a memory to me that is\npeculiarly intimate and sweet.\nThere are a hundred favorites\u2014\neach calling its own particular\nbit of grand opera back into my\nmemory\u2014a fragment of the\nopera of my own life.\nDo not deny your child the\nblessed ministry of music. It is\none of the rarest gifts. Sweeten\nhis soul with it.\nAnd he will be In good com\noany. That is the way the\nprophet Elisha liked his music.\nOs him it is written that, when\ndriven to utter weariness by the\noerplexities of his business, he\nwould cry:\n\"But now bring me a minstrel.\n\u201cAnd it came to pass, when the\nminstrel played, that the hand\nof the Lord came upon him.\u201d\n| cofferdam and carry the Colorado\nRiver around the site of the giant dam,\n! discharging the waters into the river\n| below the lower cofferdam. Sand and\n| gravel and mud will then have to be\ntaken out of the space between the two\ncofferdams and the engineers will then\ndig down to bedrock for the foundation\nof the Black Canyon dam.\n\u201cThis dam will be spectacular in mag\nnitude. In the Owyhe Dam. in Oregon,\nwhich is 405 feet high\u2014lso feet lower\nthan the Black Canyon project\u2014we had\ni far more difficulties in construction\nI than we anticipate in the Colorado\ni River, for the geologists inform us that\nthe rock there is suitable for dam con\nstruction.\n\u201cPrior to the report of the Colorado\nRiver Board, which was made to Secre\ntary West on December 1, there was a\nproblem as to whether the Boulder\nDam or Black Canyon site was the bet\nter. Personally, my selection was long\nsince the Black Canyon site, and the\nboard\u2019s report confirmed this. In the\nBoulder Canyon site there is a granite\nformation, while at Black Canyon the\nformation is known as \u2018breccia\u2019\u2014a vol\ncanic rock. All the geologists agree\nthat this is suitable material. We made\nborings 250 feet deep and found that\nthe formation was uniform and suitable\nto that depth.\nOne of Major Problems.\n\u201cOne of the major questions involving\nthe construction of the dam was how to\nget the water out of the channel, ex\ncavate and lay the foundation. The\nlast commission provides for greater\nsafeguards against heavy floods while\n1 this is in progress.\n[ \u201cThe only great problem,\u201d Dr. Mead\n- continued, \u201cis if a large, sudden flood\ncame up and washed out the coffer\nt dam. This would not mean a loss in\n, money, but would represent an appre\n. ciable loss in time.\n\u25a0 \u201cAfter the construction of the two\n\u2022 cofferdams and the river deflected it\n. is then a question of organizing our\n, forces.\u201d the commissioner of reclama\ntion declared.\nThe cost of the mighty project is\nplaced at $176,000,000. Nation-wide in\nterest has been stimulated by President\nCoolidge's signing the measure making\nit possible on December 21. and so nu\n(Continued on Fifth Page.)\nalready has outlined great plans, chiefly\narcheological. There is no doubt that\nimmense light is destined to be thrown\non early Chinese history by archeologi\ncal exploration, whereby very important\nbeginnings have been made. We are\ntold that the finds, in Honan and Kansu\nprovinces, of the 1928 expedition, head\ned by the Swedish archeologist, Dr. K\nS. Andersson. and the finds, in Shansi\nprovince, of the 1925 Freer Gallery ex\npedition, headed by Carl Whiting\nBishop, \u201chave opened up new chapters\nin Chinese archeology.\"\nThe latter amazingly illuminated the\norigins of ceramics and sericulture in\nChina, causing us to date back the lat\nter by at least a thousand years. The\nessential accuracy of the ancient an\nnals is being curiously vindicated. It\nshould be remarked that, prior to the\nintroduction of Western methods and\nthe colaboration of Western pundits,\nthe Chinese made no mean advance in\narcheology. The native literature of\nthe subject is immense and there\ntremendously interesting.\nBertrand Russell estimates very\nhighly the Chinese capacity for orig\ninal scientific work, and rightly so.\nA geological survey of China by\nnative scientists is now in process, and\nits reports engage international interest\nand respect. The biological laboratory\nat Nanking does good work; another\nis being established at Peking. Natural\nhistory is being taught competently,\nintensively and extensively in the\nChinese universities.\n** * *\nJAPAN.\u2014The Japanese Imperial Diet\nwent into regular session on Decem\nber 23. The new Lower House is the\nfirst Lower House elected under the\nnew manhood suffrage law, which in\ncreased the total of voters from about\n3,000,000 to about 12.000.000. A lively\nsession is promised, with keen debate\nover policy respecting Japan and over\ntaxation. The government\u2019s majority\nis the narrowest, and its demise in\nthe near future would cause no sur\nprise.\nA world engineering congress is to\nbe held in Tokio next year.. It seems\ncenturies, yet \u2019tis only 60 years, since\nthe Emperor Meigi took the charter\noath containing the clause: \u201cWisdom\nand knowledge shall be sought through\nout the world for the purpose of\npromoting the welfare of the empire.\u201d\n** * *\nBRAZIL.\u2014An expedition is about to\nstart into the Brazilian jungle to sift\nto the bottom native stories about the\nvestiges there of a magnificent ancient\nsettlement. The explorers (eight in\nall, including a woman and a radio\noperator) are convinced that they are\ngoing to find the remains of Ophir,\nwhence Solomon\u2019s ships of Tarshish\nbrought back no end of gold. No harm\nin that sort of thing; on the contrary,\ndelightful. With that bee buzzing in\nyour noddle, every Indian you see\nlias the Semitic cast of feature, all\nthe customs observed are Semitic.\n** * *\nUNITED SPATES OF AMERICA\u2014\nContinue! on Fourth Page.)\nAMERICA\u2019S ARCHEOLOGY\nWORTH BRAGGING ABOUT\nDiscoveries in New Mexico Show Ceramic\nWork of 100 B. C.\u2014Every State Has\nm\nPrehistoric Remains.\nBY RALPH V. D. MAGOFFIN. '\nTHE perennial joke of Rome shows\nno tendency to die. Nearly\nevery tourist follows the dictum.\n\u201cWait and see ,t.he Colosseum by\nmoonlight.\u2019\u2019 All those visitors\n1 who. touristwise, have not interlunarily\nj fitted, do go down to see the Colosseum\njby moonlight. The guides then spread\ni iheir sayings over Rome. About 90 per\nj cent of all the tourists, be they from\n; Prance, Germany, England or America.\n, all say, or are said to have said, \u201cYes.\n: the Colosseum is weirdly beautiful, but\n| how much more wonderful it would all\nbe if only they had the same moon here\nthat we have at home!\u201d That is the\n! true spirit, at all events, of what Is\n! known popularly as the \u201cpatriotic brag.\u201d\nj Many are the stories that arc current\njof what Americans traveling abroad\n! have said in exuberant praise of things\nin this country. Perhaps the best one.\nwith \u201creverse English,\u201d is that told of\nthe German professor of geology who\nvisited this country some years ago. He\nwas shown many things and had them\nexDlained to him fulsomely. But when\ni he walked out from El Tovar to the edge\nof the Grand Canyon, he lost his power\nof expression for a time. When he could\n! speak, he said, \u201cWell, here is something\nj that not even an American can\n; exaggerate.\u201d\nBragging Called General.\nNow we do not brag any more about\nour things than foreigners do about\ntheirs. It is only that most of us can\nnot talk in his own language on equal\n: terms with a foreigner. But those who\n' can say that he talks just as much\nabout money as we do, the only dif\nference being that he talks of it in\nsmaller denominations. He stresses the\nscenery of his own country more than\n; we ours, and when it comes to com\ni ment on the superior cultural, historic\n| and artistic glories which his country\npossesses over that of any other, then,\nreally, we cannot hold a candle to him.\nPerhaps there is one stage more than\ni others, however, from which we have\n, allowed ourselves to be \u201cbacked off\n\u2019 the boards.\u201d That is the stage on\nl which archeology has played its part.\n! There is a reason for it. We came into\n' the field of scientific archeology cen\nturies later than did certain of the\n1 European countries. Besides that, the\nancient dead were much more numer\nous in India, Mesopotamia and the\n; Mediterranean area than they were\nover here, and having had there a more\nor less continued population more of\nthe ancient monuments and artifacts\n1 remained there than here.\nBut the most pertinent fact is that\nthe peoples who now live on the same\nsites or in the same general localities\nclaim to be, as they in some part are,\nthe descendants of the earlier peoples\nand the heirs of their civilizations. We\ndo not claim to be either the de\nscendants or the heirs of Western\nHemisphere autochthons, because we\ndo not yet know whether there were\nany, or of Mayan, Aztec, Mound\nbuilder or Indian aborigines. There\nfore we have not an equal amount at\nstake, and we have not had to de\nfend atrocities, inhumanities, or even\nthe peculiarities of our local forebears.\nBegin to Study Indians.\nWe have begun, however, to realize\nthat there ore in this Western Hemi\n- sphere antiquities of civilizations that\n1 go back centuries farther than we had\never supposed. It seems to have been\n\u00ab the Germans who first waked us up to\n- the fact. It was nearly 75 years ago\n> that their professors and students of\nantiquity began to study the American\nIndian.\nThe splendid example of Indian\nbasketry, pottery, weapons, artifacts\nand skeletal remains which the Ger\nmans obtained in this country and\ntook back to Berlin and other places :\ngave to Germany a museum of Amer- ;\nican archeology better than anything j\nthere was here. It took years of hard\nwork before the scientists of the Smith\nsonian Institution forged ahead with\nthe collection which outranked all\nothers.\nAmerican archeology began here, as\nmight be expected, gradually, acci\ndentally, fortuitously. Our early col\nonists tried rather to avoid the Indian\narrow heads than to hunt for them.\nBut, as the red man diminished in\nnumbers before the white man, he\ngained more than proportionately in\nsentiment; or, to put it badly, as the\nIndian gave up taking the scalp lock,\nhe gained a halo. Arrow heads, as they\nwere ploughed up, became the nucleus\nof thousands of private collections,\nmany of which have now been concen- j\ntrated in local museums.\nSpecimens in Many States.\nThe mounds and earthworks In South\nCarolina, Kentucky, Ohio, Wisconsin ;\nand Minnesota became objects of arche- j\nological and historical study and the I\nthousands of bone, flint, shell, pearl, j\nred sandstone, copper and polished j\nstone artifacts of useful or ornamental\nstyle were collected, compared, tabu\nlated, published and localized.\nThe pot holes in the rocks of the\nSusquehanna, the marks on the walls\nof caves in the Ozarks, the burials in\nthe mounds of Southern Illinois, the\nserpentine and other animal shapes of\nlpw mounds in hundreds of Midwestern\nlocalities came in for their share of\nprivate, then local, then popular in\nterest.\nThe Spaniard overran Mexico and\nPeru before we were ready to start west\nof the Alleghenies. He seized all the\ngold in sight, and even made long\nmarches up into New Mexico and there\nabouts, hunting for the fabled gold of\nthe Seven Cities of Cibola. But he was\n, worse off than Goethe, who walked in\nRome, over the ancient Forum, without ;\nknow ing it. , . .\nThe Spaniard not only did not know' j\nhe was marching over the graves and\n! monuments of bvgone civilization, but\n; he did not care. But now', we have\n, begun to know it, and we care a great\ndeal. It might easily be forgiven if we\nbegan to \u201ctalk much bigger\u201d than we\n, do about the splendid remains of the j\nearly inhabitants of this hemisphere.. j\nRich Finds In Mexico.\nThere is plenty of room for pride in :\nthe fine pyramids, the wonderful deco- ;\nrative relief carvings, the artistic beauty>\nof the turquoise mosaics; in the per- {\nfeet naturalism of carved animal forms j\nand the meticulous skill of the work\nmen who made thousands of miniature |\ngods and figurines in clay, stone and j\ngold with which the culture sites of |\nthe pre-Aztec Mayas in Yucatan and \u25a0\nGuatemala abound.\nHere the fine work of late by Morley, l\nMorris and others under the Carnegie j\nInstitution of Washington should come j\nin for more than a meed of praise. The\nfour great tomes issued a few weeks ago\nby the government of Mexico as its j\ncontribution to the twenty-third In\nternational Congress of Americanists {\nwhich met in New York have illustra- j\ntions of the monumental remains in 1\nMexico that are nothing short of\nastounding.\nThere are prehistoric remains in\nevery one of the states. In many states\nthere are archeological societies which\nhave helped to gather the local an\ntiquities Into museums. It is, however,\nin the Southwest that lie buried the\ngreatest reservoirs of America\u2019s pre\nhistory. It was this dimly apprehended\nfact that led the Archeological Insti\ntute of America more than 20 years\nago to found its School of American\nArcheology at Santa Fe. in the heart\nof the region of American antiquities.\nFrom that school as a center, under\nthe w'ise and able direction of Dr. Edgar\nL. Hew'ett, now' also the head of the\nDepartment of Archeology and An\n! \u2019hropology in the University of New\nMexico, explorations have marked num\n; berless future sites for work, and ex\ncavations have laid bare many early\npueblos In this work many of our\nuniversities and schools have also en\ngaged. among which the work of Har\nvard and Phillips Andover particularly,\nunder Kidder, and of the University of\nMinnesota, deserve special mention.\nThe most remarkable of the pre\nhistoric cliff-dwelling sites in this coun\ntry are in the side canyons of the\nMancos River in Southwestern Colorado.\nHundreds of these interesting villages\nare inside the limits of the 49,126 acres\nwhich have been set \u00abside by the Gov\nernment as the Mesa Verde National\nPark. The names of Bandelier and\nW. H. Holmes, for many years chief of\nthe Bureau of Ethnology, are linked\nforever with the early days of scientific\nwork in the sites of the cliff dwellers.\nThe other type of prehistoric sites,\nwhich are many times more numerous\nthan the cliff dwellings, is the pueblo,\na large scale community tyouse. New\nMexico and Arizona are full of them.\nThey dot the tops of innumerable\nmesas, they line the side valleys and\ncanyons of the Rio Grande; there are\nhundreds in the great Pajarito plateau\non which Santa Fe is situated.\nDate Back Centuries.\nThe Hopi villages, Pueblo Bonito and\nChettro Ketl in Chaco Canyon, Gran\nQuivira and the Rito de los Frijoles. to\nsingle some out of many, are the real\nthings, and they date back centuries\nbefore such tourist show places as Puye\nand Taos.\nThe same question arises In connec\ntion with the excavation of ancien*\nculture sites in our Southwest as did.\nand to some extent still does, arise in\nthe Mediterranean, Near and Far East\nprehistoric centers. How old are they,\nand how does one know?\nThe protagonists of the Maya culture\nin Yucatan now\u2019 have certain dates that\nreach back before the birth of Christ.\nSo have the excavators in the pueblo\nsites in New Mexico. The dates of the\nformer are arrived at by the deciphering\nof Maya chronological inscriptions;\nthose of the latter by comparative\nceramics.\nIt has come to \u2019 a the most widely\nadmitted fact in arcneologicAl discovery\nthat the finds of pottery, both whole\nand in shreds, give the most exact\nchronological yardstick that science\nknows. It comes much closer in its\nfigures than does geology, and It reaches\nback centuries and millennia before\nthere was writing of any kind.\nExcavation in New Mexico.\nAn account of a single excavation,\nchoosing one out of many, ought to do\nmore to explain and clarify the meth\nods and results of a dig on United\nStates soil than any amount of argu\nment. By good chance such an exca\nvation was conducted last Summer in\nthe Mimbres Valley in Southwestern\nNew Mexico. It was done by a joint\nexpedition of the University of Minne\nsota, under Prof. Albert E. Jenks. and\nthe School of American Research at\nSanta Fe. under Wesley Bradfield.\nThat part of the work w\u2019hich dealt\nwith the chronological data from pot\ntery w\u2019as under the charge of Mr. Brad\nfield, perhaps now the leading authori\nty in this country on ceramic chro\nnology.\nThe School of American Research is\nparticularly well equipped to do singly\nor in a joint enterprise such an Ameri\ncan excavation. Director Hewett Is the\nbest all-around American archeologist\nwe have, and he has also the necessary\nknowledge of a comparative kind gained\ni in actual work and surveys in the for\neign fields of Mesopotamia, Palestine.\nEgypt, Africa, Greece and Italy. In\nKenneth M. Chapman the school at\nSanta Fe has the best expert on the\nart and decorative side of ceramics and\nin Wesley Bradfield the leading au\n! thority on chronological ceramic data,\n! based on provenience, technique and\nmaterial.\nDig In Cameron Creek Area.\nThe site dug last Summer in the\nCameron Creek district of the Mimbres\nValley is an extraordinary one. It Is\nreniote enough to have remained vir\ntually untouched, although from the\nruins one can see Fort Bayard in the\ndistance outlined in white against the\nbase of the mountain range.\nNaturally, the rooms nearest the sur\nface were of the later periods. At first\none might wonder why some of these\nlater period surface rooms w\u2019ere so\nclearly marked out as ceremonial rooms,\ncoming, as one likely would, from cliff\ndwellings or pueblos where the cere\nmonial klvas (or rooms) were under\n| ground and at a lower level than the\nliving rooms.\nBut W\u2019hen one is taken into an under\nground pitroom where objects of a\nI ceremonial character, that proved its\nj use. were found, and is shown the\nj prior, older entrance when that pit\nj room was used as a living room, the\n: transition from house to ceremonial\nj use. as the levels of the pueblo rise, be\ngins to grow clear.\nCameron Creek, which runs through\nthe Mimbres Valley, show's considerable\nerosion below the recently excavated'\npueblo. The south end of the pueblo\nwas recognized by the thousands of\nwall stones which had been carried\naway by the creek when In flood. When\nthe excavation began, it was found that\nvirtually nothing remained of the sur\nface houses except the foundations.\nWhat had not been carried away by\nthe water had been taken, after the\nabandonment of the surface rooms, for\nthe construction of other rooms toward\nthe north.\nDiscover Ancient Grave.\nThere happened to be about 50 or\nmore visitors the day the first pit\n! burial w r as found. It was under the\nj floor of a pitroom of the middle or\n; early middle period of the pueblo. It\nwas the grave of an adult woman. On\nthe bone of her left arm above the\nelbow w'ere four shell bracelets. Long\nstrings of beads and two beautifully\ncarved bracelets of shell came to light\nat the bottom of the pit to the right\no? the skull. Four broken bowls and\nj pots were on the floor of the room at\nthe right.\nThe bowls were broken, as was ex\n| pected. In the graves and tombs in\nthe Mediterranean area the pottery\n: buried with the dead is usually found\n| unbroken. In the American pueblos,\nj after the body was buried face down\n| ward and in a contracted kneeling or\ni crouching position, a large bowl was\nj purposely broken down over the heat!\nj and shoulders, and the other bowls, for\n: the most part, were either broken or\nhad a hole punched in tnem. It took\n| nearly four hours to excavate the sma!\u2019\nI pit grave just described, because sh\n[ fine gravel had to be scooped or duste'\n' up very carefully and then every eup\ni ful of it sifted;\nAshes In Fire Pits.\nThe second level was found about\n7 feet below the surface. The room:\n| were much deeper and the work ot\nexcavation therefore, necessarily war\n| much slower than in the surface rooms\nSome of the hardest work was expe\nrienced in clearing out the rooms a\nthe south end of the West Hous:\nmound. Most of July was passed ir\nthis section of the pueblo. In one oi\nthe latest used rooms the fire pits were\nfoimd still full of ashes. The floor was\ncovered with scattered pottery. The\nstubs of the posts w\u2019hich had been used\nto hold up the roof were also brought\nto light.\nLate in July two of the students from\nthe University of Minnesota were as\nsigned to the excavation of a certain\nroom which gave evidence of having\nbeen an abandoned Btoreroom. These\n90 Fifth fags.*\n3", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_keppard_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1928-12-30/ed-1/seq-23.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "3"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 36, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1932-12-08/ed-1/seq-36/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19321208", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "BY SMITHSONIAN\nRegents Hear Reports on Re\nsearch Participated in\nby 25 Expeditions.\nNotable advancement in projects of\nfundamental scientific research were\nreported to the regents of the Smithson\nian Institution at their annual meeting\ntoday by Secretary Charles O. Abbot.\nChief Justice Charles E. Hughes,\nchancellor of the institution, and his\nfellow regents were Informed of the\ndetails of studies dealing with some of\nthe basic problems of life on earth, of\nexpeditions to little known parts of the\nglobe in search of archeological, biologi\ncal and geological material and of\nrapidly Increasing museum collections\nIn the service of American science.\nAmong the problems to which special\nattention has been devoted during the\npast year. Secretary Abbot reported,\nla that of the complicated relationship\nbetween the carbon dioxide assimilation\nof plants and the light intensity to\nwhich they are exposed. This Is a\nfundamental process In the organic\nworld, a sort of dynamic corner stone\nfor the whole structure of life.\nWheat Plant Experiments.\nThe experiments, it is reported, were\nconducted with wheat plants grown in\nliquid solutions, whose chemical con\ntents of root food could be rigidly con\ntrolled. The carbon dioxide assimila\ntion of the wheat was measured for j\nlight Intensities varying from 78 to\n1.900 foot candles and for carbon dioxide\nconcentrations varying from .004 to\n.500 per cent.\nThe Institution, Dr. Abbot reported,\nsent out or participated in 25 expedi\ntions in furtherance of its researches.\nThese visited 13 States in the United\nStates, several European countries,\nCanada. Alaska, Mexico. Hispaniola,\nJamaica, British Guinea and Southwest\nAfrica. One was for the purpose of\ncollecting rare minerals in the mines\nof Mexico. Another sought to locate\nthe highest, dryest spot in the Eastern\nHemisphere for an astrophysical ob\nservatory. another made a comprehen\nsive study of the bird life of Hispaniola\nand others made important archeologi\ncal discoveries in the Far North.\nAmong the more interesting additions\nWere those made to the library. Out\nstanding gifts were a set of 45 volumes\nof a notable Buddhist work from the\nKing of Siam and a volume dealing\nwith Christopher Columbus from\nForeign Minister Orandl of Italy.\n157,870 Specimen\u00b7 Added.\nA total of 157,870 specimens was\nadded to the collections of the National\nMuseum, a governmentally supported\nbranch of the institution. A large num\nber of specimens v*ls examined and re\nported upon, exchanged with other In\nstitutions and given to schools. Collec\ntions of general biological material\nwere received from Siam and from\nSouthwest Africa. Important accessions\nIn archeology included collections of\nantifacts from prehistoric sites in\nEurope, native implements from Kodiak\nIsland, customs and implements used\nby the natives of Panama, and native\npottery and textiles fron* Africa.\nAn important series of plants came\nfrom the Brazilian-Venezuelan frontier\nand from Peru. The geological acces\nsions Included a gold nugget weighing\n81 troy ounces and important collec\ntions of fossils, particularly of mam\nmals. Important work in Oriental\narcheology and art was carried on by\nthe Freer Gallery of Art, under direc\ntion of the Smithsonian.\nAmong the significant Smithsonian\nactivities were those dealing with the\narcheology and ethnology of the\nAmerican Indians, carried out by the\n' Bureau of American Ethnology.\nI NAVY ORDERS\nLieut. Comdr. Albert P. France, jr.,\ndetached Destroyer Squadron 4, Battle\nForce; to Division of Fleet Training,\nNavy Department.\nLieut. Comdr. Bernard F. Jenkins, de- |\nteched Naval Air Station, Lakehurst, N.\nJ\u201e about February 22; to Naval Air Sta\ntion. Sunnyvale, Calif.\nLieut. Comdr. John O. Richmond,\ntick leave absence extended two months.\nLieut. Comdr. Gordon Rowe, detached\ncommand VS Squardon 2B (U. S. S.\nSaratoga ) ; to U. S. S. Chicago as first\nlieutenant. *\nLieut. Jasper T. Acuff, detached com\nmand U. S. S. S-28 about March 1; to\nInstruction, Naval War College, New\nport, R. I.\nLieut. William G. Buch, detached\ncommand U. S. S. S. 47 about March 1;\nto Naval Academy, Annapolis.\nLieut. John Connor, orders September\n3 modified; detached command U. S. S.\nR-12 about December 6; to command\nU. S. S. R-ll instead U. S. S. R-4.\nLieut. Raymond A. Hansen, detached\ncommand U. S. S. R-ll; to instruction,\nDiving School, Navy Yard here.\nLieut. John S. Hedrick, detached U. \u03b9\nS. S. Argonaut about March 1; to Navy\nYard, Philadelphia.\n\u2022 Lieut. Karl G. Hensel, detached U. S.\n8. S-31 In January; to command U. S. !\nS. S-l.\nLieut. William L. HolTheins, detached\nU. S. S. 8-26 In January; to command\nU. S. 8. 8-26.\nLieut. Henry C. Johnson, jr., detached\nTJ. 8. S. S-21 in January; to U. S. S.\nR-23.\nLieut. Dominic J. Tortorich, jr., de\ntached U. S. S. Hovey; to U. S. S. .\nPreble.\nLieut. Ralston B. Vanaant, detached !\ncommand U. S. S. S-21; to submarine\nBase, New London, Conn.\nLieut. (Junior Grade) Orville K.\nO'Daniel, detached U. S. S. R-ll about ]\nJanuary 6; to instruction, Diving School, j\nWashington Navy Yard.\nLieut. (Junior Grade) Lewis Wallace, \u03b9\ndetached U. S. S. S-32 about March 1; I\nto Naval Academy, Annapolis.\nLieut. (Junior Grade) John L. Wil\nfong, orders September 3 modified; to\n\u03a4\u0393 S. 8. Reuben James instead U. S. S.\nR-ll.\nWarrant Officers.\nGunner James M Hale, detached U. \\\n8 8. Hopkins about December 24; to\nV. S. S. Wright.\nOne-fifth of the population of Glas- 1\nfow, Scotland, live more than three In\na room. f\nI\nOne Sure Way to\nEnd Coughs and Colds\nPersistent coughs and colds lead\nto serious trouble You can stop |\nthem now with Creomulsion, an ! j\nemulsified creosote that is pleas- \u03b9 \u03b9\nant to take Creomulsion is a. new 1 \u03b9\nmedical discovery with a two-fold\naction; it soothes and heals the in- I\nflamed membranes and inhibits\ngerm growth.\nOf all known drugs, creosote is\nrecognized by high medical authori\nties as one of the greatest healing\nagencies for persistent coughs and\ncolds and other forms of throat\ntroubles. Creomulsion contains, in\naddition to creosote, other healing\nelements which soothe and heal the\ninfected membranes and stop the ir-j\nritation and Inflammation, while the\ncreosote goes on to the stomach. In\nabsorbed into th\" blood, attacks the\nseat of the trouble and checks the\ngrowth of the germs.\nCreomulsion is guaranteed satis\nfactory in the treatment of per-1\neistent coughs and colds, bronchial'\nasthma, bronchitis and other forms\nof respiratory diseases, and is ex\ncellent for building up the system ! !\nafter colds or flu. Money refunded\nIf any cough or cold, no matter of\nhow long standing, is not relieved\nafter taking according to directions.\nAsk your druggist.\u2014Advertisement.\nJg\u00ae*\u00ce>PENUNTIL 9:30P.M.FRIDAYandSATURD\u0391\u038e^\u0399\u0395\u03af\nGift Shopping Quickly\nDrive into Sears' large, free Auto Park at any\ntime. No time lost hunting for parking space,\nno danger for children, no damaged fenders.\nYou can shop \"quickly,\" or at leisure and with\npleasure. Merchandise from manufacturers of\nnational fame. Merchandise tested in Sears'\nlaboratories. Merchandise approved by Good\nHousekeeping Institute. And best of all, every\nitem first-class; seconds are never sold in a\nSears' store.\n$4.95\nAuto Robe\n$22\u00bb\nWhat a gift for\nhim. Deep, lustrous\npile, reversible.\nBlue, gold,\ntan, \u039a r e \u00b7 a,\nbl\u00bbk; 54x66\ninches.\nA Health Gift\nRowing\nMachine\n$279\nAll metal,\nform fitting\nseat. The per\nfect Home\nExerciser for\nMother, Dad\nand the\nKiddies.\nFull Size 72x84\nDuplex Blankets'\n\u25a0 Orchid and\neen.\nI\ngreen, rose\nand green,\npeach and\norchid, orch\nid and Hold,\ngreen and\npeach, bound\nwith luster sat\nBig enough to play in\n$195\nThe new white en\nameled \"Jack-Bilt\"\nHouse. A mansion,\nwe call it. Four\nchildren can play in\nside.\nBetter Than\nEver Before\n^LeMl BRlMCf A REAL\nMERRIE CHRI/TMA/\nWITHIN YOUR BUDGET\nLifetime Gifts for the Home\nMonthly Payments Easily Arranged on Furniture Purchases of $20 or More\n$9.95 Occasional Chair\n$\u00a329\nLamps\nof Unusual\nBeauty\n$19.95 Solid Mahogany\nSpinet Desk\n?3JL $1095\nJust iwel\u00effd\nthese artistic\nlampe, complet*\nwith shades\n\u2666 \u2666 \u2666\nFor the\nSmoker\n$575\nFitted with S\npiece solid brass\nset with glass.\n34 inches by 18 inches by 31\ninches. A masterpiece of\ncraftsmanship.\nArtistic design,\nstructed\nSturdily con\u00b7\n\"She\" Will Appreciate\nPastel Green\nEnamelware\n89c and 98c\n4 and 5 Quart\nTEA KETTLES\n7 and 9 Cup\nPERCOLATORS\nOVAL DISH PANS\n6-Quart\nCONVEX KETTLES\n3-QT. SAUCEPANS\nWith Covrri\n1, 2, 3 Qt. Saucepan Set\nGive \"her\" a new set of Enamel\nware for Christmas. A lifetime\ngift.\n\"KENMORE'\nC0LDSP0T\nELECTRIC REFRIGERATOR\n4 CU. FT.\n$8950\nDelivered to Your Home\nThousands of users have\ndiscovered that you can\npay more, but you cannot\nget a better refrigerator\nthan the \"COLDSPOT,\"\nsold on Sears' justly fa\nmous pledge, \"Satisfaction\nGuaranteed.\n5 CU. FT.\n$125\n6 CU. FT.\n^ $139\nMonthly Payment\u00bb Easily Airmnred\u2014Small Carryinr Charre\nI \u25a0\n\u00db\nA Visit to Sears'\nHere's the ideal gift for 'Her'\n* m * ^ ^ Hi ll! AAV>f ^ 1/ \u00ab \u03bb m is m\nT\u00b0yJ??4 1 KENMORE\nModel \"A\" WASHER\nSzLd.50\n* JL JL Cash D\nONLY $5 DOWN\nIS A TREAT\nFOR ALL AGES\nMother, daughter, father, eon,\nall enjoy immensely the modern\nbeautiful display of toys on our\nSecond Floor.\nSanta\nClaus Has\na Gift\nBook for\nKiddies\nSee the life-size mechanical\nGiraffe, Polar Bear, Clown\nand Dog.\nFun\u2014Plenty of It!\nSweet Singing\nHartz Mountain\nCANARY\nAt Sears for\nDelivered\nSmall Carrying Charge\nMore \"KENMORES\" Are Sold\nThan Any Other! ,\nIt MUST Be Good\nSears sells more washers than any other\nmaker or retailer in the world. Such fea\ntures as Lovell Wringer, Triple Vane\nAgitator, Noiseless Cut Gears make the\nperfect washer.\nTested in Sears' Laboratories\nApproved by\nGood Housekeeping Institute\n$298\nPrize Singer* with\nbeautiful plumage.\nAdds cheer and hap\npiness to your home.\nDon't fail to see\nthe new chrome\nplated\nGAGE\nfor\n$^50\nLIMITED QUANTITY\nFull Porcelain Enameled\n\"Prosperity\" Qas Ranges f\n$2925\nCASH\nWhile Quantity Lasts\nDELIVERED and INSTALLED\nOven Heat Control.\nTouch-a-Button\nLighter.\nFull Porcelain\n' Enamel\nOnly Down\nSmall Carrying\nCharge\nApproved by the\nAmerican Gat\nAssociation\nTested in Sear\u00b7\nLaboratory\nA beautiful range at a\nsavings of at least\n$20.\n-m\n$10 Automatic\nToaster\n$595\nA prize gift, but quantity\nis limited ; chrome plated.\nHas cone-glow tell-tale\nlight. A wonderful buy.\nFully guaranteed.\n\\>\n\\\n\\\nNoritake China\n\u03a4 ea Set\n23\nBeautiful\nPieces\nValue\nSix each of plates, cups and\nsaucers, covered tea pot, cov\nered sugar and creamer.\nDon't fail to see the amaxing\nchina and glassware bargains\nmow ready.\nDouble Electric\nSANDWICH\nTOASTER\n$119\nCooking surface 11x6 inches.\nGuaranteed element\u2014chrome\nplated case over copper.\nDripless frying surface; for\nalternating or direct current.\nCoffee Tastes Better\nWhen Made in a\nPERCOLATOR\n7-Cup Size\nFull\n$2.50\nValue\n$129\nMade of alumi\nnum. Has spe\ncial quick heat\ning element. A\ngift that will\nlast for years.\nSee our new line of\nElectrical Appliances at\nnew low prices.\nA Useful Gift\nfor the Home!\n\"Challenge\"\nFRUIT JUICER\nMade of hear? cast aluminum;\nmounted on hardwood base with\nrubber bumpers to prevent mar\u00b7\nrinr of surface. Board base is fin\u00b7\nished with acid-resistinf lacquer.\nA Helpful Gift for Years!\nNationally Known\nKENMORE Cleaner\nWith\nAttachments\n$1955\nGreatest Vacuum Buy of the Hour\nOnly\n$4\nDown\nWhat a chance\nto buy her a\nlabor and time\nsaving gift!\nYears and years\nof efficient\nservice.\nA marvelous\ncleaner in every\nway.\nAttachments in\nelude rubber\nhose for dusting\nand detachable\nnozzle with re\nmovable brush.\nEverything\nneeded to do a\nquick cleaning\nthroughout the\nhome.\nMonthly\nPayments\nEasily\nArranged\nSmall Carrying\nCharge\nFEATURES\n\u039c \u03bf tor-driven brush\nPowerful motor,\nwith Norma ball\nbearings (Never\nneeds oil)\nMore vibrating,\nsweeping and\ncleaning action\nFait provides great\ner suction\nApproved by Good\nHousekeeping In\nstitute\nTested in Seart\nLaboratories\nNationally Advertised\nARVIN.\nFan\nForced\nHeat\nRegulator\nEnergex\nHeating Pad\nWill Not\nOverheat\nFull Size\nWith three-heat thermo\nstatic control , twitch.\nHandy for Winter com\nfort.\nSee our complete tine of\nHeating Pads.\u2014Basement\nVISIT OUR\nMODERN, BEAUTIFUL\nBASEMENT\nnimnniiiiiiiiiiL\u00b7\n*\nS \u0395 A R S , HO \u0395 \u0392 UC \u039a AND C \u039f\nSATISFACTION GUARANTEED or your money back\nRETAIL DEPARTMENT STORE\u2014911 BLADENSBURG RD. N.E.\nNoiseless fan draw* in th\u00b7\ncold floor-air and circulates it\nthrough \u00b7 non-burning heating\n\u2022lement. It is seven times\nmore efficient than the old\nhowl-type heater.\n-\u25a0'Sf J ' ' \"\nChrome Plated\nFull 6-Lb.\nIron\n$1 19\nA gift beauty, guaran\u00b7\nteed for one year. Elec\ntric iron, complete with\n\"U nderwriter Ap\nproved\" cord and plug.\nFor a Better Light\nTHIS GIFT\nSears pur\nchased thou\nsands of these\nnew kitchen\nlights to aeil\nat 89c instead\nof $1.50.\nWhite Porcelain Shade,\n9 inches in diameter\nElectrical Fixture* of $20 or\nmora told mi easy payments.\nOPEN EVENINGS\nUNTIL CHRISTMAS\nBEGINNING DEC. 9\n. _ ..\n\u00b7-. \u03bd\u00b7.\u00b7\u00b7fcfci\u00b7.. *\n~'r- i\u00b7- ' ..... ~4~;n.. , .. .--., - ;,v> .\u00abafci\u00b7..", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_1bernal_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1932-12-08/ed-1/seq-36.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "C-4"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 6, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1928-08-05/ed-1/seq-6/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19280805", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "6\nNEW CHINA ACTIVE\nIN SCIENCE FIELD\nDr, Chi Li of Smithsonian\nSays Archeology Will Be\nVigorously Developed.\n\u25a0\u25a0\nThe new Chin* has officially mw*-\nnired modem science.\nAccording to Dr Chi Li. Arid archeol\nogist. of the Freer Gallery under the\nSmithsonian Institution, who was h're\nthis, past week on his way to Europe,\none of the Arst acts of th\" new Nation\nalist government was thr creation of a\nNational Research Institute. Though :\nobseureo by the front-stage political j\nand military activity in China. Dr Li\nbelieves this act offers an important j\nkev to the Quality of the new power\nin his country It proves that the new\nChina is abreast of the world\nThe purpose of China\u2019s National Re\nsearch Institute.\u2019' said Dr Li. \"is ex\npressed in a phrase borrowed ft'om the j\nSmithsonian Institution\u2014the increase\nand diffusion of knowledge. The insti- ;\ntute has already organized an expe\ndition to the province of Kwang Si to\natudv the geology, paleontology, zoologv |\nand botany of the province. The expe- 1\ndition hopes also to include eventually\nanthropology and archeology in its j\n\u2022rope.\nSupport of Work.\nThe cost of the expedition is shared\nby the national government and the\nprovincial government of Kwang Si\nThe institute hopes in this way to d?- :\nvelop systematic scientific exploration\nof every province in China lam very\nsure that the next 10 or 20 years will\naee a revolution in the study of archeol\nogy m my country and a great develop\nment in all other sciences. All we need\nis a stable government.''\nThe membership of the National In\natitute includes 30 outstanding scien\ntists of China Dr. Li represents arch'\u2019- j\noiogy in the membership, and was the\nfirst scientist appointed to the new or- J\ngaruzation He will continue as Arid ;\nrepresentative of the Smithsonian and j\nthe Freer Gallery. In fact the Smith- j\nlonian plans to co-operate actively with\nthe new institute It is Dr. Li\u2019s opinion\nthat the new growth of national sell- ;\nconsciousness has considerably bright - ,\n*ned the outlook for foreign co-pperc- \u25a0\ntier, in scientific research in China.\nScience in China.\nIn sketching the history of modern j\nscience in his country. Dr. Li said that\nthe first national activity of importance\nbegan with the founding of the Chinese j\nRepublic in 1912. Shortly thereafter\na science society was organized in this j\ncountry to diffuse in China the scion- !\ntific knowledge accumulated by the\nWestern world. In 1920. a biologic? 1\nlaboratory was established at Nanking,\nand there is a movement on foot at -\npresent to establish a second labors -\nton- at Peking.\nResearch of considerable importance\nhas been done in the universities. At\npresent, .all Chinese universities teach\nnatural history intensively, and grad\nutes of Chinese institutions have done\nsuccessful post-graduate work in Amer\nican universities. As a result of this\n\u2022ltuation the body of Chinese scholars\ncapable of doing original scientific\nWork is growing rapidly.\nThe most productive native institu\ntion. according to Dr Li. has been the ,\nGeological Survey of China, organized\nabout a dozen years ago. Its geologi- I\neai paleontological, and archeological.\nreports arc internationally known\nInterest in Archeology.\nDr Li points out that the reverence\nto which the classics are held in his\ncountry 7 naturally makes the subject of\nnrcheotegy appeal to educated men.\nIn 1923 a Swedish archeologist of\nthe museum at Stockholm. Dr. J. S.\nAnderssen, made discoveries which open\na new chapter in Chinese aicheoiogy. f\nIn the province* of Honan and Kansu,\nhe unearthed bone and stone imple\nments and pottery fragment* width!\nrepresented a materiel culture unlike\nanything that had been known from\nChina before that time. The discov- j\nerics bore considerable resemblance to]\nfinds of prehistoric material made in\nMesopotamia and in Persia, a feet j \u25a0\nwhich suggested that the various sec- j l\nturns of the prehistoric world were not ]\neo isolated as had been supposed Dr. j\nAn&'-rssen anted th; period, in which\nthe culture winch he uncovered had ex- j\ntoted at about 3000 B C.\nIn 1925 Dr. Li joined the Freer Gai\nter- expedition to China which was \\\nheaded by Carl Whiting Bishop and i \u2018\nundertook an archeological survey of 1\nthe Feng River valley in Shansi Prov -\nince Two prehistoric sites similar to t\nexcavated by Dr. Anderssen were\nfound and later investigated.\nThe Smithsonian - Freer expedition -\ntook patn& to itoUS tbt difficulties,\nwhich peasant superstition places in the\nway of excavation in China. In a coun\ntry of ancestor worship ii is sacrilege }\nto disturb the graves of the dead, of j\ncourse.\nWatched by Natives.\nWhen we began excavating\" said\nDr Li. \"gentry and peasants alike kept\nconstant watch upon us They could\nnot believe that we would work so hard\nto collect piece* of broken pottery and\nwere convinced that we were in search\nes treasure of one serf or another\n\u201cOne day one of my most intelligent\nworkmen came upon a human skeleton, j\nWithout attracting the attention of ttu <\nusual crowd of onlookers he notified j\nme and I directed him to avoid uncov- j\nering the skeleton. Had the peasantry\nseen it they would have made serious I\ntrouble fer us and I was worried to I\nknow how we were going to avoid let- j\ntmg them see it. Fortunately, the next j\ndav rain came end kept the watchers j\nindoor;, m that we were able to re- I\nmove the skeleton unobserved.\n\u201cIt is still too soon to attempt reg\nular excavation of old tombs In Chma.\nA leng process of popular education\nwill have to precede that At present\nwe must restrict ourselves to villag\nsites where there Is less chance of of\nfending religious scruples \u201c\nHowever as Dr Li points out the j\ndespoiling of tombs is common enough j\nin China \u2014not by archeologists, but\nby vandals in pursuit of valuable !\nbronze* and other works of art. which\nforeigners purchase at fabulous price* j\nMillions are involved in this traffic\nwhich has done irreparable damage to j\nthe most valuable record of China'*\npge\u2019 and which is proportionately dis- !\nfinal* to stop. The same condition of !\nvandalism exist# now in China as e*.\ntsted in Greece in the early nineteenth\ncentury\nTh* new- Nationalist government >\u25a0\nshowing its oualitv bv an attemp te j\ncombat this evil. D* Li has been acker\nby the government to draw up a \u25a0set of\nrules for the preservation of Chine:-.'\narcheological antiouiuee. He has\nstudied the regulation* in force in\nEgypt, to Greece and in some American\nstates and is using these as a basis\nfor his recommend*?km* One univer\nsal rule hr finds is that archeological\nmaterials are considered the property\nof the nation and can't be claimed by\nthe finder a* an individual\nDr U will visit the principal museum\nof Europe preparatory to hi* return \u00bb<\nChin*.\nBODIES TO BE REMOVED.\nFrontier Cemeteries Near Coolidge\nDam Will Be Transferred.\nThe imminent completion of the\nCoohdgr Dam in Arizona will ';*m\nthe flooding of a large are* in the\nvtcini\u2018> including the 'wo military\nCemeteries of frontier day* at the Man\nCarlo* Indian Agency at \u00ab*n Carlo*\nThe Wsr and Interior Depart\nment* have arranged f\u00ab rthe immediate\nremoval of \u00bbH the bodter including\nIndians t/> better protected ground in\nthat vtetoffy.\n| PUT ON RETIRED LIST |\nt v 1\nn 4 j|H|nHiwv \u00ab- 'yM\nHit, fiMM\n&9R8&& |K jtorcHkTHHPi\nK\\ Ja* \"T,\nGeorge Mrln\u2018ortf. auditor in the General Accounting Office, receiving Haskr\nnt flowers from his fellow workers when he was retired after 3R vr.trs of i*nr'\n\u2014Star Staff Photo.\nU VEX\u00a3SEuI)PEANS\nKellogg, cn Trio to Faris for\nSigning Peace Pact. May\nBe Questioned.\nBY GF.nVTLLF. REAGHT.\nBi Ua..i- lo .He\nPARIS. August 4.\u2014When Sr ere tar;\nKellogg meets the other foreign min\nisters m Paris In sign the war outlawry\npact, it will be difficult for him*to avoid\nconversations with them on several\nquestions of ?h\u00bb highest importance\nAmong the most important is the\nUnited States' recognition of the dr\nfacto Nanking government.\nAdvanced opinion in Europe, includ\ning botn'England and France, considers\ntms move extremely clever, coming a\na time when the relations of th? pow\ners, particularly Japan, are d'-ciaedly :\nstrained. The Paris labor paper. Le\nPeuple, instantly demanded that\nFrance follow Americas example.\nComdr. Ken worthy. British Radical j\nleader, declared in the House of Com\nmons that His majesty s government |\nhad backed the wrong horse.\u201d thus\nprovoking Secretary Chamberlain s in\nteresting reply by Chinese unity.\nIt looks as though America's benev\nolence this far has been ill repaid by ,\nthe Nanking government. It has served\nchiefly to increase the Nationalists'\nappetite before they have demonstrated\ntheir ability to appease Chinese rival- j\nries and constitute a stable regime\nthroughout China\nFrance Continues Protest.\nTherefore. France, like other powers\nwhich still have to settle the question\nof the Nanking and Tsinanfu incidents,\nwill continue to protest rgainst China's -\nunilateral denunciation of treaties. I\nspecifying that the latter must remain\nin force until replaced by new agree\nments. Consequently, France's atti\ntude will not parallel America's, nor\nwill there be hasty recognition of a\n, regime which, despite American sup\nport, may be transitory.\nAmerica's action in China is certainly j\nthe big surprise of the week but there !\nis another matter which also claims\ncareful attention.\nOn Monday Foreign Secretary Cham\nberlain disclosed in the House of Com\nmons. to the astonishment of the Quai\nD\u2019Orsay, the Franco-British disarma\nment compromise, the text of which\nhad been communicated to Washington\nand other interested capitals.\nThis document represents not so\nmuch an agreement as a cessation of\nthe disagreement last March at Geneva\nIn It i\u00ab discovered a trace ol Lord Cush\nendun's proposal and the admiralty's\nideas which the three-power confer\nence had failed to ratify, namely the\nreduction in tonnage of capital ships to\n27.500. and of gun calibers from 16 to\n13*2 inches On the other hand, cer\ntain percentages adopted at Washing\nton. which .seemed humiliating to\nFrance, are discarded.\nSecretary Kelloggs letter to Admiral\nPbrter last February, proposing the\nabolishment of submarines, finds par\ntial satisfaction in limiting the number\nof undersea craft exceeding 600 tons,\nleaving the nations free to build small\nsubmarines for coast defense,\nBerlin Alarmed.\nThus France has accepted the Brit\nish admiralty's conception, while Great\nBritain recognizes the validity of the\nFrench general staff\u2019s claims concern\ning the reserve effectives in land armies\nwhich had caused alarm in Berlin,\ni It is true that this compromise might\n| appear tit the general public more like\ni a military and a naval entente than a\ni step toward disarmament. Pacifists tcr\n! tainly will not approve of it. though\nI the armaments therein provided are\n' strictly defensive.\nBut before criticizing it. one must\n> consider it, as a continuation of the\nsuspended efforts of the preparatory dis\narmament conference It marks asu n\ntoward the resumption of those efforts\nand also toward a new navai confer\nence which this time may accomplish\nwhat the 1927 parley signally failed to do.\niCopyrittht. I>2\u00bb >\n| Pleasingly I[\nConspicuous\u2014\n!\n\u2014is the home that is kept attractive bv\nvrooH paint- Such home* s.lamd out from\ntheir neighbors, in bold relief when . . .\nI 'Murco\u201d Lifelong Paint\nproclaims to the world that, those who\ndwell within 1)0 care for appearances . , .\nare proud of their neighborhood! \u201cMurco\"\nis* the jrreat outdoor paint . . . beautiful,\ndurable, 100% Pure.\n; I E. J. Murphy Co., Inc.\n710 Twelfth St. N. W. Main 2477\nTHE SrXDAT STAR. W.\\ STTiyItTON \u25a0 T). C. 'ATOTST S. 102* -TART T.'\nFOCH SEES SELF HONORED\nWatches Unveiling' of Ftatue in\nOwn Memory nt Ypv\u2019s.\nPAPI3 *P) -Marshal Foch has Just\nachieved the rare distinction of seeing\nhis own monument unveiled.\nA huge equestrian .vatu?. dominating\nthe war-wrecked city of Ypres. was 1\ndedicated as a lasting memorial to the\ncommander-in-chief of the allied forces. ;\n* Premier Poincare addressed the throng. 1\n: saying that Marshal Foch'* head had\nnot b*?n turned by praise and glory.\n\u2014x\u2014 r \u2014\nHEATING CO\n1# N Yo * Av-. N.W.ljp\nV LIFETIME 1\nHEATING |\n\\ EQUIPMENT J\n! i FOR /I\nJpNo Cash ft\n% Needed y\nII y <** you can/ Ij\n* lot Water jj\nas Igw as\n; |325|\niftONVEN lENftil\nfepTERMS\nM AMERICAN j\u00a7L\nmj RADIATOR Sm\nW PRODUCTS w\nprodtieed bv world v |\nforemosi healin* en*!-\ni SM n\u00abers in*tsiled bv rr- ,)\n! fW liable \u2022xperlv. whose work W\\ i.\ni* absolutely eu*r\u00abn:**o \u00bbc i\n(M And m addition\nM DresMcxilv reduced b'tces K\n(M ' r HF \u2019\u2019AStvST TEflMfl \u25a0]\nrn IN TOWN! That** what 1(\nj V yon set when you PHONF K\nI For Katima'e w\nPhone Main 3067 I\n| Without any obli*#Mon on |\na ycur part.\n,1 S.yr. written euarante- I\n1 with rrrry Heatint Plant. I\nfl Intlndr* fi radiators. \u201cW I\ntt. radiation, I*-ln. \u25a0\nS|general^\nmmumm\nM 9 07 N.Y.M\nm AVE.NwIm\nVJBMmaim office MMU\n\\S2S NORTH#\nXHOWAPPST-!#\n! BALTIMORE, MD.\nPresenting Unusual Suite Values in\n*\n\u201cFurniture of Merit\u201d\n\u2022I\nThii slogan of ours\u2014\u201c Furniture of Merit\u201d \u2014isn\u2019t merely a phrase\u2014it\u2019s a declaration of superior quality\u2014\nto which we lend every effort, exercise every facility to attain and sustain\u2014selling at prices that emphasize the\nunusualness and typifying the advantage of buying here.\nI 3-Piece Living Room Suite\u2014sl99 /? / j\nWorkmanship and covering material are the determining elements in Living Room Furniture\u2014and the\nhandsome covering on this Suite\u2014rendered with skill\u2014puts it in a class high above the featured price. Genuine J | fjfl\nmohair is used, with doubly figured material on the reverse side of the cushions. Web bottem spring seats, spring- ITJ\nfilled cushions. Every detail demonstrates the exceptional value\n_\n10-Piece Dining Suite\u2014sl79\nWell matched walnut veneers, with sturdy gumwood as a foundation. Note the graceful lines; the excellent poaa\n\u2022isc of the pieces. The Buffet is M inches long; and finished with many unusual refinements. The Chini Closet # I /U\nhas linen drawer, which is convenient. The chairs, side and arm, are effectively designed. A wonderful Suite for X\u2022 t/\nH\ni ,\n\u2022 \u2014\u2014 L\n4-Piece Bedroom Suite\u2014sls9\nYou have only to compare the handsomely figured walnut veneers, and the high grade of workmanship a\nwith Suites offered at similar prices to know that \u201cFurniture of Merit\u201d is a guarantee of superior quality. # I\nYou don\u2019t have to be an expert judge\u2014the evidences are plain\ni ; ji :\n|| I .\nOpen a charge \u2014 you are very\naccount welcome\nHouse\n\u201cFurmtute_ of Meritor\ngqi mfiwr* gp my r\nSeventh ahW Eye Streets.", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_keppard_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1928-08-05/ed-1/seq-6.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "6"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 21, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1929-02-17/ed-1/seq-21/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19290217", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "PETY TO HOLD\n50TH ANNIVERSARY\nAnthropological Group to\nObserve Founding at Cos\nmos Club Tuesday.\nThe AnthroDologicftl ; Society of\nWashington, third oldest of local scien\ntiflc societies, will observe its fiftieth\nanniversary at the Cosmos Club Tues\nday.\nThe society was founded in 1879 by\na small group of local medical men and\nethnologists. Only the Medical Society\nof the District of Columbia, founded in\n1819. and the Philosophical Society of\nWashington, founded in 1871, are older\namong the Capital scientific organiza\ntions.\nFrom the first it has played a prom\ninent part in anthropological research\nthroughout the world, but especially\namong the primitive races of America.\nIt has had divisions of anthropology,\nethnology, prehistoric archeology,\npsychology, asthetology, technology,\nsociology, philology and criminal an\nthropology, all of which have made im\nportant contributions.\nMaj. John W. Powell, founder and\nfirst chief of the Bureau of American\nEthnology of the Smithsonian Institu\ntion. was president of the society nine\ntimes.\nOthers Fill Chair.\nOther well known scientists who filled\nthis chair were: Prof. Otis T. Mason of\nthe National Museum: Dr. Robert\nFletcher, an Army physician, who had\nspecialized in anthropological measure\nments during the Civil War; Dr. Ains\nworth R. Spoflord, librarian of Con\ngress; Dr. Washington Mathews, Albert\nS. Gatschet of the Bureau of American\nEthnology; Dr. Frank Baker, director\nof the National Zoological Park and\nprofessor at Georgetown University:\nMiss Alice C. Fletcher, originator of\nthe study of Indian music; James\nMooney of the Bureau of American\nEthnology; Frank H. Cushing, Col. Gar\nrick Mallory, Dr. James C. Morgan, Dr.\nJoseph M. Toner, Dr. W. J. McGee, Prof.\nWilliam H. Holmes, Dr. C. Hart Merri\nman, Dr. George M. Kober, Dr. Jesse W.\nFewkes and Dr. Frederick Webb Hodge.\nThe Anthropological Society is the\nparent organization of the Washington\nAcademy of Sciences, of* the American\nAnthropological Society, and of the\nAmerican Journal of Anthropology.\nAmong the distinguished foreign scien\ntists which it brought to Washington\nwas Alfred Russell Wallace, co-discov\nerer of the theory of evolution. The\nsociety has worked in close co-opera\ntion with the National Museum, the\nBureau of American Ethnology and the\nArmy Medical Museum.\nThe present president is Dr. Charles\nL. G. Anderson.\nElected as Members.\nThe following foreign anthropologists\nare to be elected honorary members at\nthe fiftieth anniversary dinner:\nArgentina\u2014Prof. Roberto Lehmar.n-\nNitsche, professor of anthropology. Na\ntional University of Buenos Aires; chief,\ndepartment of anthoropolgy, Museo de\nla Plata, La Plata, and Dr. Felix Outes,\nprofessor of anthropology, National Uni\nversity of Buenos Aires; director In\nstitution of Geographical Investigation,\nBuenos Aires, Defensa 1171, Buenos\nAires.\nBrazil\u2014Dr. A. C. Simoens da Silva,\ndirector Musco da Silva, Visconde de\nSilva 111, Rio de Janeiro.\nCanada\u2014Mr. Diamond Jenness, chief\nof the division of anthropology, Na\ntional Museum of Canada, Ottawa,\nOntario.\nDenmark\u2014Dr. Knud Rasmussen, lead\ner of the Danish Thule expeditions,\nSigridsvej 12, Hellerup, and Prof. Wil\nliam Thalbiteer, professor University of\nCopenhagen, member Royal Academy\nSciences and Letters, Copenhagen.\nEcuador\u2014Dr. Max Uhle, director of\nthe museum, professor of American and\nprehistoric Ecuadorean archeology, Cen\ntral University of Ecuador, Quito, and\nBenor Jacinto Jijon y Caamano, box\n187, Quito.\nT. A. Joyce of England.\nEngland\u2014Mr. Thomas A. Joyce,\ndepartment of ethnography, British\nMuseum.\nFrance\u2014Dr. R. Vemeau, professor of\nanthropology. National Museum of\nNatural History, Jardin des Plantes,\nParis; curator. Museum of Ethnography;\npresident, Society of Americanists of\nParis, and Dr. Paul Rivet, assistant,\nNational Museum of Natural History;\nprofessor of anthropology. Ethnological\nInstitute, 191. Rue St. Jacque, Paris.\nGermany Dr. Konrad Theodor\nPreuss, director, American department,\nMuseum of Ethnography, Berlin-\nFriedenau, Hahnelstrasse 18, and Dr.\nWalter Lehman, director. Institute of\nEthnological Research, SW 11, Prince\nAlbert St., 7, Berlin.\nMexico\u2014Dr. Manuel Gamio, formerly\ndirector of anthropology, Department\nRoyal\nQ Street at Eleventh\nAll New Spring Shades in\nSale of Hosiery\nAt Practically Wholesale Cost\na new shipment of \u201cA JJT PDPfJ^^POBO\nthese splendid hose \u2014\u25a0 I \\ \\ \\\nmode to sell for more \\ \\ \\\nFull fashioned, pure thread silk hose\u2014 \\ 1 \\\nand silk from top to toe, too. Clear, \\ I j\nevert weave, of a fine, sheer weight. \\ '\nYou'll know, the minute you see them, \\ /\nthat they\u2019re most unusual at this price. \\ /\nMany colors, including the new cos- \\ /\nmetic and sunburn Spring colors. /\nNovelty Heel Silk Hose i l\nSmart hose with fashionable | ,]\nnovelty heels, in black and JL \u2022 A j JQjT\nself-color; plain points and fancy effects.\nAll-silk chiffon and sheer silks. AAEr *\nHosiery\u2014Main Floor T1 ~\nNew Kayser Marvelray\nUnderwear for Women\nA make that is standard for quality rf*\nBloomers in regular and extra sizes; all made with\nthe popular marvel fit reinforcements. In dainty pas- |F\ntel and the darker street shades also.\nKayser Marvelray Vests, 88c\nIn low neck style\u2014vests that match the bloomers above. All with\nreinforced armshields and in regular and extra sizes.\nKnit Underwear\u2014Main Floor\n| Soloist in Concert\n\u25a0i m ift. m\nMRS. WALTER K. WILSON,\nSoprano, who will take part In the\nGeorgetown 10-event course program\ntomorrow evening at the Georgetown\nPresbyterian Church.\nof Public Works, Mexico City, and Dr.\nJose Reygadas Vertiz, director of anthro\npology, Department of Public Works,\nMexico City.\nPeru \u2014Dr. Julio C. Tello, professor of\nanthropology, University of San Mar\ncos of Lima; director of the Museum\nof Inca Archeology.\nSweden\u2014Baron Erland Nordenskiold,\nprofessor of geography and ethnography,\nHogskoia, Gotenborg; director, ethno\ngraphical section, Kulturhistorisches\nMuseum.\nU. S. S. R.\u2014Dr. Waldemar Jochelson,\nanthropologist; authority on primitive\nAsiatic and Alaskan peoples, and Prof.\nWaldemar Bogaras, University Museum\nof Anthropology and Ethnography.\nLeningrad, U. S. S. R.\nWORLD WAR ORDER MOVES\nNATIONAL HEADQUARTERS\nOffices Transferred From New York!\nto Washington\u2014To Be at 408\nand 407, of 1518 X Street.\nThe national headquarters of the\nMilitary Order of the World War has\nbeen moved from New York City to this\ncity at 406 and 407, 1518 K street.\nThe national officers are: Com\nmander In chief, Col. Thacher T. P.\nLukueer, New York; vice commander in\nchief, Admiral T. J. Cowie, Washington,\nD. C.; vice commander in chief, MaJ.\nGen. J. A. Lejeune, Washington, D. C.;\ntreasurer general. Col. David T. Aber\ncrombie, New York; judge advocate gen\neral, Maj. W. L. Symons, Washington,\nD. C.; surgeon general, Brig. Gen. P. J.\nA. Farrell, Chicago, 111.; chaplain gen\neral, Col. T. J. Dickson, Washington,\nD. C.: historian general, Maj. J. Ham\nmer, New York; adjutant general, Lieut.\nCol. David T. Abercrombie, New York;\nassistant to adjutant general and ex\necutive officer, Col. Courtland Nixon,\nWashington, D. C.\nThe order is composed of officers who\nfought in the World War.\nMEN\u2019S CLUB WILL HOLD\nINDOOR CIRCUS IN APRIL\nGroups of St. Stephen\u2019s and Incar\nnation Episcopal Church Plan\nFour-Day Event.\nAn indoor circus, featuring clowns,\nacrobats and jugglers, will be presented\non four successive days, beginning April\n9, by the Men\u2019s Club at St. Stephen and\nthe Incarnation Episcopal Church, Six\nteenth and Newton streets, for the pur\npose of raising money for the debt re\nduction fund of the Institution.\nAll three floors and communicating\nrooms of the new parish hall at the\nchurch will be used in staging the novel\nentertainment program, according to S.\nPercy Oliver, former president of the\nclub, who Is in charge of the affair.\nNOMINATION* DISCUSSED.\nMr. Glassie, Selected as Judge,\nCalls at White House.\nHenry H. Glassie, nominated two\ndays ago by President Coolidge to fill\nthe new judgeship on the District\nSupreme Court recently created by Con\ngress, called at the White House yester\nday afternoon and conferred for about\n15 minutes with the President.\nOn leaving Mr. Glassie said he had\nmerely called to pay his respects to the\nPresident and thank him for his con\nfidence.\nTHE SUNDAY STATt, WASHINGTON, D. C\u201e UEBTtUARY 17, 1929-DART I.\nPalais Royal\n10,000 Yds. High-Grade Plain and Printed\nSILKS in an Extraordinary Two-Day Sale\nA Wonderful Opportunity for Savings on all the Following Desirable Fabrics\u2014\n-39-inch All-Silk Flat Crepe _ 32-inch All-Silk Tub Crepe\n(soco'ors) W Jn r /| 32-inch All-Silk Wash Satin\n39-inch All-Silk Chiffon / \u25a0 I (Lingerie Shades)\non- iTiiewt d \u2022 x . /,i. u f' m IV if 35-inch All-Silk Check Taffeta\n39-inch All-Silk Printed Chiffon \\ M(Stripes and Checks)\n(Plain and Changeable) \u2122\n3S - m t A \\ S t Sir\" Ta Tr I Yard\n39-inch Alio life Crepe oatin \u25a0 (Heavy Quality)\nQO \u2022 All \u2022 *jr f* M 35-inch Costume Velveteen\n39-in. All-Silk Printed Georgette (Black and Colors)\nTHESE VERY UNUSUAL VALUES ON SALE MONDAY AND TUESDAY\nSilks\u2014Second Floor\nA New Spring Model New Spring Hats Fancy Pillows in All\nGraceful, smart new shoes take the first step\ninto Spring's fashionable limelight Chic, inspired by Agnes {fog &WCSt Sl^CieS\n% /S--\u00a3l yy are presented tomorrow The Keynote of\nYour \u00bb\nf shoe\u201d with Tts one-strap 30 * mportfmt for such lovely pillows\non the foot, too. Little turbans that deftly follow the line of the roun( L half circle, oblong and\nhead, that fit sleek and close to the face, are these o^er shapes.. .lovelv\nIt is all in dull black kid and has a medium charming little models which we will show you to- lustrous rayon satins...all\nit is an in aun oiacK Kia, ana nas a meaium morrow. They are in new and Spring-like hues, with \u00ab ciuj w :,t- c n ft nnrp\ntoe and an attractive High heel\u2014a simple ornaments and subtle drapery to accent their Knj ok \u2019 P\nshoe for street or dress wear.\nShoes \u2014Second Floor Millinery-Third Floor 4rt Needlework-Second Floor\nOur Entire Stock Men\u2019s All-Wool Overcoats\nHigh-Grade Rejpdhr cieara \u00dflue, Oxford Grays\nAll-Wool Garments ff | t 1 and Mixtures\n, . /- \u2022iArxir cl \u2022 J ) B B B * W \u2014 are included \u2014and the coats are\nWhitney finish Metcalf fabnes-at y\u00ab \u25a0 #lf tailored in the season\u2019s newest styles.\none low price regardless of former price. K B 1 Double-breasted, box and tube models,\nEvery coat is now included in this special M # * atin and ra - von lined . : satin-piped seams.\nm M It s a great opportunity to get your coat\noffering. jKKL for next Winter!\nMen\u2019s Store\u2014Main Floor\nDOLLAR DAY for Men and Boys\nM,.\u2019, 11.95 P.t- I 1,200 tom Men'.\nWool Union Suits SHIRTS ' Rayonand^ ,eSocks\nLong-sleeve style; ankle length; -1 fn\u201d Spring''colors\" and jf\nmedium weight; closed crotch; Madras aH Xf Wfmj greens, grays, tobacco, navy and cor- >\u25a0\nsizes 36 to 46. Splendid values. I Broadcloth dovan; durable and good looking; 10 I\nA Prints WA '\n,5 xtf a p- 50 \u201c Zyi\u2019Lrr \u00bb Men\u2019s 25c, 35c &\nMen\u2019s Pajamas SS2 STS, tE Ml IV \\\\ sSl'fo\" 500 socks,6pairs\nBuy the first pair at the regular price Sfl m\u201cct \u2122okbl J\nof - $2 f so Tt h so extra pair forsl - both i L y F.n *1 \u201cd tneni\npairs for $3.50. M. .'\u201cTr: p.r\"\u00ab NIL// fa,hi \u00b0 n ' d - -splendid values. X\nand all guaranteed to fit \\ f \\\n600 Men\u2019s *1.69 and *1.95 Li:\"\"\u2019 \u2014\u2014l Boys\u2019 *1.25 Flannelette\nFlannelette Pajamas 200 Boys\u2019 All-Wool I Pajamas \u201c; r\nished with frogs and pearl buttons; IVIuUIC ljUllo pajamas-mostly one-piece styles; $1\ncut full; sizes A, B, C and D. X A Regular $3.98 \"4 sizes 4to 14 years; stadium brand. |\nGrades =====\nMen\u2019s Broadcloth 89c to $1 Four-in- 3to 8 Year Sizes Boy\u2019s 4-in-Hand Boys\u2019 $1.50 Tom\nHand Ties, 2 for All-wool kiddie suits, in Oliver Ties, Four for Sau \\er and Bell\n5i..v?.7. ,\u2019a v IOr \u201e ~ .__ A Twist, Flapper and Middie styles, \u201e . , J .\u201e Brand Shirts\nSleeveless and knee New ttes-open end . attractive anil nrmnlar Four-in-hand silk Two hundred from\nlength; made with style; made with 71 = 1 in many attractive and populat ties in plain colors 71 ?* P r JTSi I hL\u00bb* toc l c: f 0 1\" Si\nelastic webbing in slip bands; .tripes, \u00abP| c ? Ior combinations. 3to 8 year _ redi aVy, $1 $1\nback; cut full; sizes B dots, jacquard and I f \\IA/ L. sizes only. erreen, brown and \u25a0 broadclothT In all the I\n34 to 42. all-otjr effects. Boyt , ShQp Main rIQQr purple. ?a , to S UH g si\u00abi! ten \u201c\u2019\nMens Shop, Main Floor , Boys\u2019 Shop, Main Floor\n21", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_lateef_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1929-02-17/ed-1/seq-21.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "21"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 22, 
      "county": [
        "Maricopa"
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn84020558/1916-10-22/ed-1/seq-22/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Phoenix"
      ], 
      "date": "19161022", 
      "title": "Arizona republican.", 
      "end_year": 1930, 
      "note": [
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Includes: Supplement promoting Phoenix and the state with photographs and biographies of prominent Arizonans, Aug. 1892."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "Arizona"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Arizona--Maricopa County.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01217111", 
        "Arizona--Phoenix.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01213753", 
        "Maricopa County (Ariz.)--Newspapers.", 
        "Phoenix (Ariz.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Phoenix, Ariz.", 
      "start_year": 1890, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "Republican Pub. Co.", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Daily republican"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn84020558", 
      "country": "Arizona", 
      "ocr_eng": "PA7B TEN\nTHE AIUZONA REPUBLICAN. SUNDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 22, 1916\nInez Milholland Boissevain\nto Speak Here October 25\nTHIS FELLOW KNOWS\nHE'S WELL DRESSED\nAND ITS All Our\nFault!\nNEW PRICES\nTouring Car, $414.85 Runabout, $399.85\nF. O. B. PHOENIX\nFIRESTONE TIRES\nFOR ALL CARS\nFORD GARAGE\nlit II Kant Adams Telephone 614 ED RUDOLPH\nit's one of\nA Little If oney\nand little Courage\nv\nI\nARflroChonce forme\nOstsniisiic Investor\nv ' \" API 1\n- ,\nK, v\n. X ' '\nOpportunity it knocking at your door. NOW is your chance to buy\na lot in\nInez Milholland Boissevain,\nThe ideal spot for a cozy home choice building lots 50x140 Electric\nlights, city water, sensible building restrictions. No city taxes.\nOnly $25 Cash-$5 Monthly\nIt is not absolutely neccesary to build your permanent home immediately,\nbut you can build a temporary house on rear of lot and occupy it for a\nperiod of one year, and use it for a barn or chicken house after you\nbuild permanently.\nGet rid of the landlord and banish the rent receipts. You'll never bo\nsorry if you start now. Own your own roof.\nJust Phone 429 and make appointment and wa will call for you and\nshow you.\nH. C. Thomas Real Estate and lav. Co.\nThomas Bldg. Phone 429\nPROF. GUMMINGS IS\n(BED IRK\nA f:ii\" appreciation of 1 'rofessor !\nHymn I'uinmms.i of the University of!\nAr.zona is otitamcd in a recent edition '\nof the American Anthropologist, the\nH-HiliriK puMi atjon of its kind in the\nwestern hemisphere, which enjoys an\ninternal ional reputation in scientific\n1 circles. A quotation from the article\nfollows: I\n\"The progress of anthropological in\n?'ni'Tion in colleges is always inter-\ncstiiH.-, inco it iliustntes, in part at\nleast, the extent to which the results of\nref-'-arch in science arc accepted ,y the\nthinkinu men and women of the coun\ntry. Arizona I 'diversity is the most\nrecent of our American institutions to\nadd a course in anthropology to its cur\nriculum, and to undertake the .serious\npresentation of facts relating to the de\nvelopment of human'culture. The head\nof the newly organized department is\nI'rofestior ISyroti CnmminRs who, pre\nvious to his rr sinnalion as dean of the\nschool of arts and sciences at the fni\nVfrsiiy of 1'tah, conducted numerous\nexpeditions and instructed laree classes\nin archeology at the I'Uh college.\nThe fame of Arizona as a field for\narcheoloKi'al research has lonn heen\nrecognized, hut no local effort was\nmade to Kuide and increase puhlic\nkniwledL'e of archooloev until I'rofes-\nInez Milholland l!dssevain, famous\nsuffrage .speaker, and noted as one of\nthe most beautiful women in the I'nited\nStates, has started on her twelve\nthousand mile whirlwind tour which\nwill carry her to every important\nequal suffrage city in the twelve suf\nfrase states. Mrs. lioissevain noes as\nthe messenger sent by the disfranchised\nwomen of the east to the votinK women\nof the west with a last appeal before\nelection, askinR that they vote for wom\nan's freedom and not for a party prin\nciple. She will speak at more than\nfifty meetincs, speaking in 1'hoenlx\nnext Wednesday October 2f. and end\ning her tour in Chicago, November 4, j\nwhere a preal demoustration is to tie\nheld November 4 by the women of\nIllinois.\nMrs. lioissevain is well chosen as a\nmessenger of the disf ranchiscd women.\nhaving lost her citizenship by marry- i\nnil; a foreigner a discrmination prac\nticed only against women in this coun\ntry and having been denied admit\ntance to both Harvard and Columbia\nlaw schools on the simple uround that\nshe was a woman.\nI .Mrs. Boissevain writes feelingly of\nI' her loss of citizenship: \"I discovered\nthat It was a loss in more than name.\"\nshe says. \"It is attended with all sorts\nof real disabilities. Chief of these to\na woman, since we are not allowed to\nvote, is the possibility of beinc deprived\nof our very means of livelihood.\n\"1 am a lawyer by profession, and\naccordinK to the bar admission require\nments of my own state. I must be a I\ncitizen in order to practice law. Now j\nif my husband should not choose tp '\nbecome a citizen. 1 am helpless, al\nthough my residence is here, my sym- ;\npathies are here, my interests ideals,'\naffiliations and activities are all\nAmerican. i\n\"As I write this, a mag comes into:\nmy office who used to be in prison. He '\nis a Kood friend of mine, and I know\nthat since leavinc prison he has been !\nhonest and faithful anil efficient. He\nhas done his job well. Now he asks mo\nto endorse an applicat ion to the gov\nernor to have citizenship restored to\nhim. ,\n\" 'Why.' I ask him. 'Say.' he an-\nswers, 'You can't do a thine without\nit. You have no standing, I may have\nto co to court as a witness. The mo\nment they find out 1 am not a citizen\nI am discredited. I stand no chance of\nbettering myself. I can't apply for a\ncivil service Job or any city position.\nI can't apply to any politician for a\njob. llelieve me. it s hard to earn your\nliviiiK anvway, but without citizenship\nit's impossible. I couldn't vote last\n.Saturday, and was ashamed. I'll move\nheaven and eartli to be a citizen\na i; a in.'\n\"I understood him perfectly, and he\ntrot my endorsement for reinstatement\nI am in position to help this man. but\nI nin in no position to help myself, and\n1 have Just as much need of help as he,\nfor 1 too must earn my living. As\njudi,e of a man's fitness for citizen\nship my judgment is valid; as Judge\nof a woman's my decision is void. To\nrestore myself to citizenship is not\nwithin my power. I am helpless. I\nhave no power to safeguard or regain\nthe right 1 hold dearest in the world,\nand no guarantee of preserving my\nmeans of livelihood.\n\"What can I do for myself and for\nthe hundreds of others in the same\nposition as myself? Citizenship is a\nmatter determined by congress. The\nact of 1107 provides that any Ameri\ncan woman who marries a foreigner\nshall take the nationality of her hus\nband. Therefore I must address my\nprayer to congress. I have done so,\nwithout result.\n\"I do not believe that members of our\nnational legislature any more than\nanyone else do things for nothing.\nThey busy themselves, and quite right\nly, with those of their constituents who\nhave something to give them in return\nfor their activities political support.\nWomen are not constituents in this\nsens and consequently our requests\niire promptly shelved.\"\nThe Inez Milholland meeting in Phoe\nnix will lie a novel and brilliant event\namong the political campaigns in Ari\nzona. There will be unusual decora\ntions and special music at the Y. M. C.\nA. stadium for the occasion, and a large\nnumber of representative local women\ninterested in the meeting and its aim,\nwill sit on the enlarged stage:\nY VV!\nll I\nlift t.,\ntheTsystem\nCLtAft or Tounp Gtniltmti\nit's a Gladstone model, double breasted,\nwith narrow lapels.\nif you should see him on the street,\nyou'd remark \"That IS a clever suit.\"\nand it is.\nwhy envy him we have one here for\nyou.\n'A PERFECT UNION SUIT\nStoop in it\nStand in it\nSit in it\nYou can't make it gap,\nbunch or bind.\nan attractive showing of\nall styles\nheavy cottons\n$1.25 Up\nwarm woolens\n$2.50 Up\nthey're exciting the interest and challenging\nthe admiration of young men all over this coun\ntry as no make of clothes ever did before.\nsuch exclusiveness in the style.\nsuch beautiful fabrics\nsuch marvelous values will arouse YOU to the\nhighest pitch of enthusiasm.\nwe are convincing satisfied customers every\nday that\nyou'll do better at\nhorse shoe tire.\nThe tire is manufactured in Racine.\nWisconsin, by one of the oldest and\nmost reliable concerns of its kind in\nthe world.\nThousand of Racine horse shoe tires\nhave been used by large corporations\nin the east and by many concerns in\nsouthern Caiitornia, and it is said\nthat very seldom is an adjustment\nnecessary. Although the tire is\nguaranteed for 500') miles, the manu\nfacturers claim that it is nothing un\nusual to obtain twice that mileage.\nIn fact, this tire has given many\nowners over :;0,nio ; miles of satis\nfactory service.\nof December, 1910.\nThe said Hoard of Regents reserves\nthe right to reject any or all of the\nplans and specifications which may be\nsubmitted according to, the program\nof the competition, and also reserves\nth? right to make its own provision\nfor the superintendence of the erection\nof said building.\nThe program of this competition.\nIncluding genera', specifications for\nsaid building, information relating\nthereto, blue prints of sueeeted floor\nplans, a map of th University\ngrounds, and pictures of several of\nthe. University hmldir.Es may be se\ncured on application to Dr. R. B. voti\nKleinPmid, President of the University\nof Arizona, at his office upon tho\ngrounds of said University\nBoard of Regents of the University\nof Arizona.\n(Signed)\nBy William Jennings Bryan, Jr.\nHated Tucson, Arizona.\nSeptember 25, 1316.\nIS'\n15c Size\nHard Water Soap\n10c Cake\nBear's Have Regular\nBargains\nV\nskilly d\nIf\ni nn unnr v - j\nI IIU UUU W .T1\nn ai... dStsZt\n1 1 rii it vmrn\nUlUg OIUIG\nOpp. City Hall\n-41\nsor Cummings accepted the chair of\narcheology in September. i:i1.\". His\nfirst year's itistrui'lion divirled itself\ninto two parts, embodying, respective\nly, general courses in Kuropean and\nAmerican archeology. Jwring the first\nsemester a class of even students be\ngan its work with a brief glance at the\ngeography of prehistoric Kuropc and\nthe known evidence of the distribution\nof eolithic, paleolithic, and neolithic\nculture. Special attention was given\nto ancient man and his problems in\nKngland, France, Germany and Italy.\nIn like manner the students gained a\nworkable knowledge of ariy Kgyptian.\nAssyrian, Cretian and Grecian culture,\nthe latter being traced to the I'ersian\ninvasion.\n\"For the second half year Professor\nCummings is centering attention upon\nthe American field. That this phase of\nthe subject is more interesting to\nwestern students and that the first part\nof the course gained considerable popu\nlarity, is evident (rum the fact that\nclass numbered twenty the second half.\nThe geological history of the continent\nwas briefly treated, before the Ameri\ncan red race, with the several 'henries\nof its origin, received consideration. In\nstruction also covered the ethnology of\nthe American tribes, especial emphasis\nbeing laid upon those of the great\nplateau regions of Arizona, New Mex\nico, Utah and Colorado. Professor\nCummings intends that the first year's\ncourse in general Kuropean and Amer\nican archeology will serve merely as a\nfoundation for more advanced instruc\ntion, and hopes, at the same time, that\nIt will he recognized as a proper basis\nfor the study of history and sociology.\"\nThe above article calls attention to a\ndeficiency that the university is trying\nto correct. The law creating the uni\nversity made it encumbent upon the\nboard of regents to maintain a state\nmuseum, yet at no time has there been\nfinancial provision for its malnten\nance. Probably no state in the union\noffers greater oportunlties for a state\nmuseum than does Arizona. Its anthro\npological field cannot tie excelled: it\nis the home of the Cliff Dwellers and\naboriginal races; the work and Indus\ntry of the Indians is probably more\nclearly shown than in atiy other state.\nWithin the university buildings are\nthousands of interesting, unique and\nrare museum exhibits, all boxed, how\never, awaiting a proper place for their\nexhibition.\nThe work of Professor Cummings not\nonly calls our attention to this need,\nbut also to the work the other states\nare doing, extracting specimens and ex\nhibits from Arizona for their own\nmuseums. Unless Arizona acts quick\nly, the best from within the state will\nbe lost. A museum is virtually a\nnecessity.\nE5\nNOTICE TO CREDITORS\nICstate of Joseph l.ovell, deceased\nNotice is hereby given by the under\nsigned administrator of the estate of\nj Joseph Lovell deceased, to the credit\n1 ors of and all persons ha\", ing claims\nj against the said deceased, to exhibit\nI such chinas with the necessary\n' vouchers, within ten months after the\nfirst publication of this notice to the\nsaid administrator a.t his office, s. U.\ncor. Central and Adams Street, Phoe\nnix, Arizona, the same being the\nPlace for the transaction of the busi\nness of said estate, in the sfti.l\nCounty of Maricopa. State of Arizona.\nDWIGKT H. HKARD.\nAdministrator of the estate of Jo\nseph Lovell, deceased.\nDated this Ifith day of Oct., 1916.\n, o\nHire & Little Salesman at the Re\npublican office. A Want Ad. will see\nmore customers than you can.\nINTRODUCED\nIntroducing another well known tire\nto the Arizona motoring public, the\ns Angeles Saddlery & Finding Com\npany is gaining quite a reputation\nfor being progressive tire distributors.\nThis w.'\"k the large Ixs Angeles sad\ndlery house placed the racine horse\nshoe tire on the local market and it\nIs reported that motorists are al\nready showing unusual interest In the\nnew arrival,' and it promises to be\ncome a favorite with Arizona automo\nbile owners.\nThe tire has a unique tread of\nhorse shoe design and comes in either\na ombination of red tread and white\nside walls, or white all over. Hoth\nfabric and cord tires are constructed\nhv the manufacturers of the racine\nHow About That Stove?\nYou'll need it before you know it. Wo have all sorts of heaters nd\nstoves at all sorts of prices, and we know you'll find ons to suit you in\nour stock. Bettor order it before the rush is on. We'll gladly show you\nthrough the stock and assist you in making a selection. Wood, coal and\noil heaters are here. Drop in and pick one out. We'll set it up for\nyou and you'll be all fixed for the cold weather, DO IT N0W1\nEZRA W. THAYER\n\"Everything in Hardware\"\n124-130 East Washington St. 127-133 East Adams St.\nNOTICE TO ARCHITECTS\nThe Board of Regents of the Uni\nversity of Arizona In accordance with\nthe provisions of the laws of Arizona\nhereby advertises for plans and speci\nfications in detail for a College of\nMines and Engineering Building, to be\nerected upon the grounds of the Uni\nversity of Arizona, near the Citv of\nTucson, County of Pima, State of Ari-zona-\nThe sum authorized to be expended\nfor the erection of said structure, in\ncluding architect's premium and the\nfeel for superlnten ence of construc\ntion Is the sum of $150,000. The prem\nium which is to he awarded to the i\narchitect whose plans and specifica\ntions for said building may be adopted\nIs 3 per cent of the total amount ap\npropriated for the purpose aforesaid,\nand the fee for superintending the\nconstruction of said building Is 2 per\ncent of the total amount so approp\nriated. The architect whose plans and spec\nifications may be adopted, before any\npremium shall be awarded therefore\nmust execute and file with the said\nBoard of Regents a good and suffi\ncient bond with two sufficient sureties\nthereto, or with an approved surety\ncompany as such, in the penal sum of\nFive Thousand Dollars ($r..\")0.00), said\nbond to be approved by said Board or\nRegents, conditioned that within sixty\ndays from the date of said tond tne\nsaid architect will, on presentment to\nhim, enter into a contract containing\nRuch conditions and orovisions as m,iv\nbe required by the said Board of Re- i\ngents, and also that he will give sucn\nfurther bond to secure him in the\nfaithful performance of such contract\nwith such sureties as may be required\nof htm, In the event that said Board\nof Regents should within sixty days\nrequire said architect to enter Into\nsuch contract to erect said structure\nat the' price aforesaid.\nThe preliminary plans and specifi\ncations In detail, for such . building\nmust be submitted to the said Board\nof Regents at the office of the Presi\ndent of the University of Arizona\nupon the grounds of said University\nby 12 o'clock M. of the fifteenth day\n' i.\n' JLi k\n\" L ....... J\nA\nLETTER\nFROM\nJ.H. Kinney\nREPUBLICAN\nCANDIDATE\nJustice\nof the\nPeace\nEast Phoenix Precinct\nPhoenix, Arizona.\nPhoenix, Arizona.\nMv Friend:\nIn seeking the office of Justice of the Peace of\nthe Hast' Phoenix Precinct, I desire to ask you to\ncarefully examine my record as Chief of Police for\nthe six years, 1901 to 1907, and to note the fact that\nat this time it was an elective office for which 1\nthree. times successfully made the race.\nThe duties of Chief of Police include not only the\nmaking of arrests but the adjusting of many small\ncomplaints and grievances, which unless adjusted\nin peace means trouble and litigation.\nIf elected, I pledge vou that I will earnestlv en\ndeavor to be a Justice of the \"PEACE'' and not\nmake the office a persecuting station on the way to\nthe Superior Court for the creation. of numerous\nexpensive jury trials.\nI am anxious for you to know I will appreciate\nyour vote in the coming election and will try to see\nyou personally before that time and' have a talk\nwith you.\nYours very respectfully,\nJ. II. KINNEY.", 
      "batch": "batch_az_iguana_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "arizona republican.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84020558/1916-10-22/ed-1/seq-22.json", 
      "place": [
        "Arizona--Maricopa--Phoenix"
      ], 
      "page": "PAGE TEN"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 119, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1937-10-03/ed-1/seq-119/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19371003", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "THE OHIO MOUND BUILDERS IN AN EASY-TO BUILD MODEL\nTHE WORLD\nBy HOIUNG CLANCY HOLLjNG\n1_\nTRADERS IN PARROT FEATHERS\nAND OTHER PI.UMAGE FROM MEXICO\ni\nTRADERS IN BI ACE OB! -*\nFROM VI LLO 1 O N E PAR K i\ni A 1\nTRADERS IN SHEET MICA\nFROM NORTH CA KO1 IN A\nTRADERS IN COPT'\nFROM LAK1\n*\nCopyright. 1937. Esquire Features. Tne. /\nTrademark Registration Applied For /\nto/S/37 /\nSCISSORS, PASTE AND WRAPPING PAPER\nALL YOU NEED TO MAKE THIS CUTOUT\nHere is a Diorarrte that is easy to assemble. A Diorama is not a flat picture. It is a minia\nture stage set with a foreground and a background showing distance. This one shows a scene\nin an Ohio city two thousand years ago. Have you ever heard of the Mound Builders? They\nwere ancient races of American Indians. Their greatest civilizations had vanished before\nColumbus discovered America. The state of Ohio contains some of the best examples of\ntheir great mounds, with the richest treasures buried in them. And, although these man-made\nhills are scattered across America, some of the ancient races are called \u201cOhio Mound Build\ners\u201d because their style of building was first discovered in Ohio.\nWhen you have finished this model, you will seem to be standing among these strange\npeople. Behind them on hills are other parts of their walled city, and beyond that a great\ntemple on a flat-topped mound, with rolling hills in the distance. There are really only three\nparts to this Diorama\u2014a FRAME or front of the model, the curving BACKGROUND, and\nthe people in the city street.\nTo make this easy model, use heavy wrapping paper to stiffen the cutout pieces. FIRST,\ncut all the cutout pieces away from this page. It is easier to paste them down separately.\nDON\u2019T trim to outlines until later. Spread paste (with small cloth swab) evenly over a piece\nof wrapping paper. Then lay one cutout piece on the pasted paper and put it under a weight\n(such as magazines) to dry flat. Do this with all cutout pieces. Then, WHEN DRY, make\nall inside cuts and slits and crease all dotted lines for folding. Now trim to exact outlines, and\nfollow easy directions under STEP ONE, STEP TWO, etc.\nK STEP ONE: When the\n) white spaces have been cut\n/ from inside the FRAME,\nyou have part of a CITY\nSTREET which folds\n2 down on long dotted line. \u00bb\u25a0 ,\n7 STREET WALL folds\n| upward. HOUSE ROOFS\nI fold inward.\nSTEP TWO: BACK\nGROUND curves around,\nand the two hooks at bot\ntom (Tabs 1-1) fasten to\ngether. BACKGROUND\nENDS fold back. *\nSTEP THREE: Paste\nBACKGROUND ENDS\non outside of FRAME in\nsnarps lpft fnr thpm\nTHIS IS HOW DIORAMA WILL LOOK WHEN FINISHED\n* STEP FOUR: Key ends of STREET WALL at 2 and 3. At left, house\nI wall folds forward like hinged door, keying into roof at 4 and into street\n*>at 5. Do the same with poles at right, 6 and 7. .\u2018Key all pieces into their\nslits, following numbers in rotation. Paste ;down all tabs behind and\ni underneath.___'\nN\nr\n1 I \"\u25a0\u25a0\u25a0wupawmeJUMBi \u25a0yjjwi1\n\u2019 archeology THE WORLD MUSEUM OF THE WASHINGTON STAR Pamrric?1' |\nCopper was mined near\nLake Superior and\n] \u201cpounded cold\" into\nmany tools and articles\nk \\ of ornament. Sheets of\nmica were alsc cut into\n1 ceremonial patternsand\n|| buried with the dead.\n11\u2014,,. \u2014. ..\na\n2 z\n> 3\nH O\nM \u00abM\noE \u00ab<\n'-'w oa,\nQ2 DIORAMA \u00ab(\u00ab\n<\u201e FRAME \u00a32\nw\" O*\nsg STREET WALL \u00a7w\nw\u00ab fco\nI\" io\n\"S \u00bb\n2 \u00ab\n. S CITY STREET \\ - <\n0 y(jjr- . \u2022**\nmm- v\n__ -* m\nObsidian (black vol\ncanic (lass), flint and\nhard crystal became\nbeautiful objects under\nthe clever hands of the\nMound Builders. They\n\u25a0were also expert potters, jfj\ncarvers and weavera. 9\nI ! \u201d^_________\nTHE OHIO MOUND BUILDERS\nThese ancient people made three principal types of mounds. Some were massive fort walls miles in length.\nSome were ceremonial \"effigy\u201d mounds in the shapes of animals, birds and reptiles. Others were monuments to\nthe dead. On flat-topped mounds huge temples were built containing kitchens for ceremonial feasts, rooms for\npriests, ceremonial costumes, treasures, and sacred altar fires. Larger rooms held rows of the city\u2019s dead, cov\nered with stone or timber roofs. In time, each temple was burned and earth heaped over the ruins. Some of\nthese mounds even today are over sixty feet high, their bases covering acres of land. From treasure* found In jjf\nthem we know something of the life of these people two thousand years ago. Fortified cities with extensive \u00ab\ngardens contained thousands of inhabitants and many temples. Trade routes connected them with all points of the a\ncompass. As there were no horses, trade goods were carried on the backs of men for thousands of mile* ||\nThis Diorama shows traders in bright feathers from Mexico, obsidian from Yellowstone Park, mica from jj\nNorth Carolina and copper from Lake Superior, being welcomed by a chief and his men ih a southern Ohio city,_ jf\n| NEXT SUNDAY'S WORLD MUSEUM DIORAMA\u2014-A DREAMER FINDS A NEW WORLD J :\n\u00bb \u2022\n*", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_1kahlo_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1937-10-03/ed-1/seq-119.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "5"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 33, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1907-10-20/ed-1/seq-33/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19071020", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "Lost Cities Awaiting Discovery\nAn Opportunity for Wealthy Young Men to Earn Distinction\nNotwithstanding aii the ex\nplorations of the last three centu\nries, there are still lying under\nground in all parts of the ancient world\nnoble cities of the distant past that await\nbut the spade of the investigator to\nrender tip their treasures <>f art and their\nsecrets of history. It is a curious cir\ncumstance that while the study of the\nancient languages in school and college\nhas lost much of its former importance\nin the last generation. no age has taken\na greater interest than this in the monu\nments of ancient civilization that are con\nstantly coming to light Devoted scholars\nof the New World as well as the Old\nare betaking themselves to the outermost\ncorners of the earth,?to the forests of\nYucatan and Ceylon, to the arid sands\nt>f Egypt and the bleak deserts of Syria F\nand Turkestan,?where, often at the risk\nof health and always at the sacrifice of\npersonal comfort, thev are rebuilding for\nus the fabric of ancient life, completing\nand verifying history and tradition, and placing\nbefore our eyes bv means of photographs the cities\nand burial places, and. !>y means of objects gathered\ni t museums, the art and industry of peoples long\nvanished and often forgotten, but to whom we\nourselves owe in great part >ur civilization, our arts,\ni nd our religions\nBooks on archeologic.il travel and exploration\nlire making their apjK'arance in ever increasing\nnumbers, and their ready sale hears witness to the\nintense popular interest that the American jjeople\nare taking in the work of these pioneers of history.\nWhat better proof could we have than the fact that\ni.ianv foreign writers publish their works in English.\na> Lanciatii on the excavations of Rome, Pais on\nquestions of Roman legend and history, and Mau\non Pompeii?\nThat this popular zeal for archeologieal and\nhistorical investigation is coincident with a de\ncline in the importance generally given to classical\nstudies in this country, is due to two fundamental\ncauses First, the essentially practical stage of edu\ncational methods through which we are passing:\nand second, the wretched system of classical in\nstruction which afflicted our colleges and univer\nsities during the last fifty years, condemning the\nstudents to arid philological disquisitions, and\nrobbing the fascinating life and literature of the\nGreeks and Romans of all its beauty There are\nmany and evident signs that the tide is turning.?\nhas been turning for ten years.?and if the future\nof classical scholarship in America now looks brighter\nthan ever before, the credit must be given to the\nexplorers and investigators of buried cities and\nlemeteries, and to those who have popularized the\nresults of their work in attractive books and enter\ntaining lectures.\nWhere Are the Old Cities\n' ? 'i IE R E are three leading questions that everyone\nwho makes a special study of archeology is\ncalled upon to answer almost daily: First, how does\nit happen that ancient cities in their entirety were\ncovered with earth, forming sometimes veritable\nhills of their own materials, and preserving their\ntreasures of wealth and art until our days? Second,\nhave not the ravages of time and the avarice of\nman, and lately the spade of the\nexcavator, already well nigh\ndespoiled ancient sites? And\nthird, where are the renowned\ncities of the past that still he\nunexplored? To answer these\nquestions sufficiently and ex\nhaustively would require a book:\nbut I shall try to do what I\ncan v.ithin the limits of a brief\npaper.\n1 he first question involves a\ni ' nplicated answer, for the\ni es that determined the decav\nBy\nGEORGE N. OLCO'\n'rofessor of Roman Archeology. Columbia Universit\nDrawings by H. C. Townsend\nor fall of ancient cities were different in different\ntimes and places. The unique example of Pompeii,\nHerculaneum, and Stabiae is familiar to all. Three\nflourishing towns, with the fertile farms and smiling\nvillas about them, were overwhelmed in one night\nby the awful river of lava and rain of ashes from\nthe volcano; and since the recent eruption of\nVesuvius and that of Mont Pelee we have been able\nto study these phenomena in all their terrible reality.\nBut such was not the lot of the hundreds and thou\nsands of cities and towns of the ancient world.\nHow then is it that they too were buried, not by a\nsudden visitation of fate, but by the hand of man\nor the slow, engulfing lapse of time?\nConsider the turbulent conditions of ancient life.\nWar was the spirit of the age,?-state against state\nand city against city in implacable rivalry, until\nRome by conquering all brought peace within the\nboundaries of civilization The laws of early war\nfare knew little of the sentiment of mercy; once a\ncity was taken and sacked, its people, men, women,\nand children, were sold into slavery or put to the\nsword, its buildings and walls razed to the ground,\nand, as if to preclude its ever rising from its ashes,\nthe very site was plowed over and leveled with the\nsurrounding plain. As Horace says:\nProud cities by anger have come to their fall.\nWalls and towers been razed by a fell demolition,\nAnd the plow with its furrows lias covered them all.\nThe Fate of Carthage\nCUCH was the fate of Saguntum in Spain at the\n^ hands of Hannibal in 218 B C., and such in turn\nwas the terrible end of Carthage itself only seventy\ntwo years afterward; and these are only two familiar\nexamples out of hundreds. On both sites later\ntowns arose, built over the old cities, with no attempt\nto recover and utilize the earlier building materials;\nand indeed this would not have repaid the trouble,\nso complete had been the devastation. Of imperial\nCarthage, the Romans did not leave one stone stand\ning on another; and of Saguntum, Livy tells us\nthat just before Hannibal made the final breach in\nthe walls, the chief citizens, with the fell determina\ntion of despair, gathered in a vast pile in the central\nsquare gold and silver bullion, coin, vessels, and\nstatues,?everything of value both public and\n:y\nprivate,?reduced the whole by tire to\na mass of shapeless wreckage, and threw\nthemselves into the seething flames. Yet,\nhe says, \"The town was taken with\nimmense booty. Though almost every\nthing had been purposely destroyed by\nthe citizens, and in the promiscuous\nmassacre old and young alike had per\nished. and what few captives were taken\nalive became the booty of the soldiery,\nnevertheless from the public auction of\nwhat was left a large sum of money was\nsecured, and much precious household\nfurniture and clothing was sent to Car\nthage \"\nThe later towns disappeared in their\ntime, and Roman Saguntum is repre\n_____ sented to-day by some ruins known\nIw I \" as Murviedro [Old Walls]; while of\nRoman Carthage, the great metropolis\nof the African Christian writers, only\n______ meager remains are being gradually\nbrought to light by the skilled researches\nof Pere Delattre.\nCitybuilt over city is the story of ancient\nbarbarity. Xo less than nine distinct towns and\nvillages have been found superposed on the hill of\nHissarlik. the site of ancient Troy. It was far more\nconvenient to throw down the dismantled walls and\nlevel the place for a new community,?and who\nwould delay such a work to dig into the rubbish\nunderneath in the possibility of finding hidden\ntreasure? Thus town after town on Hissarlik hill\narose on the ruins of its predecessor, and Alexander\nthe Great visited there the wretched village of his\nday in a spirit of reverence for the legend of Priam\nand Hector; but the finding of the great silver\ntreasure near the Scsean Gate was reserved for Dr.\nSchlieinann and modern scholarship.\nBut not even the violence of warfare can account\nfor the burial of most ancient cities. A still more\nactive cause may be found, curiously enough, in\nthe growth of the cities themselves, or in circum\nstances due to a shifting of population, or a change\nof rulers, or even to the adoption of a new religion.\nTo us of modern times this must seem decidedly\nstrange; but it is a fact none the less. In our cities,\nwhere we construct a new building on the site of an\nold one, we are careful to remove the debris and\nbuild on bedrock, or at least on the old level. We\nseek to cut down hills, and traffic requires a broad,\nsmooth surface for our streets.\nBut in ancient times such was not the case, or\nrather it was a rule that operated to a less degree;\nand even when it did operate, as in Rome, it pro\nduced iust the result I am describing In the earlier\ndays, when commerce was secondary to war. the\nmost inaccessible sites were chosen for towns, that\nthey might be defended more easily. That is why\nTroy arose on the hill of Hissarlik. and Rome on\nthe Palatine; and even where growing commerce\nand civilization spread the town over the plain, its\nsacred and public buildings remained perched on\nthe inaccessible hill, its original seat, as in the case\nof the Acropolis at Athens and the Acrocorinthus.\nWho can travel in Italy to-day without wondering\nat the small towns of Tuscany and Umbria, set so\nhigh on the mountain tops that the peasants must\nlose an hour or two a day in getting down to their\nwork in the fields and back to bed at night ? These\nare survivals of the age of war. Little Palatine\nRome of the eighth century before our era was a\nsettlement of shepherds, who\ndrove their flocks down in the\nmorning to browse in the plains,\nand barricaded themselves at\nnight in their highland fortress.\nOld Buildings as Foundations\n\"QUT when Rome grew into a\ncity and spread over the sev\nen hills and the intervening\nvalleys, the very isolation of the\nhills which had been a source\nof safety and defense became\nan obstacle to progress. Hence,", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_weimaraner_ver02", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1907-10-20/ed-1/seq-33.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "5"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 55, 
      "county": [
        null
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83045462/1930-10-05/ed-1/seq-55/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "Washington"
      ], 
      "date": "19301005", 
      "title": "Evening star. [volume]", 
      "end_year": 1972, 
      "note": [
        "\"From April 25 through May 24, 1861 one sheet issues were published intermittently owing to scarcity of paper.\" Cf. Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Also issued on microfilm from Microfilming Corp. of America and the Library of Congress, Photoduplication Service.", 
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Publisher varies: Noyes, Baker & Co., <1867>; Evening Star Newspaper Co., <1868->", 
        "Suspended Jan. 1-6, 1971 because of a machinists' strike."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "District of Columbia"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "Washington (D.C.)--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204505", 
        "Washington (D.C.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "Washington, D.C.", 
      "start_year": 1854, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "W.D. Wallach & Hope", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Star", 
        "Sunday star"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83045462", 
      "country": "District of Columbia", 
      "ocr_eng": "ORIENTAL POTTERY\nLISTED AT MUSEUM\nDepartment of Archeology\nAnnounces Collection of Rare\nSpecimens Centuries Old.\nCharacteristic in type, rare in execu\ntion, unique in decoration and bearing\nthe impress of the centuries, briefly\ndescribes a collection of Oriental pot\ntery just acquired by the Department\nof Archeology of the National Museum.\nDr. Walter Hough, head curator of the\ndepartment, identifies the workman\nship of this collection as belonging to\nthe various centuries dating as far back\nas the seventh. Persian in name, these\nrare objects show descent from the\npotter's last art of the vanished civiliza\ntions of the ancient East.\nSpecimens of Rare Design.\nAffected by long burial in the earth\nVrhich brings out a lovely iridescence,\nDr. Hough said, these pottery speci\nmens are of rare interest to th? arche\nologist. Since the earliest time, precious\nmetals and especially the luster of the\nhighly prized copper cf the dim and\ndusty past, have been used for deco\nrative purposes. This collection, to the\nextent of two or three sizable bowls.\nDr. Hough explained, displays the skill\nof the ancients in applying the copper\nluster by a process of painting and\nfiring.\nSome of the pieces, deep bowls with\none small foot, after the Chinese\nfashion, are distinctive In type since\nthey represent a special stage of\nprogress in the evolution of pottery.\nEarly in the ninth century, the skill\nattained by the Chinese in making this\ntype of pottery vessels aroused the\nspirit of rivalry in the Persians. As a\nresult their ruler sent special messen\ngers to the Chinese Government ask\ning for trained artisans to teach the\nPersian subjects Chinese methods. The\njoint artistic efforts of these two nations\nresulted in a blending of Chinese form\nand technique with Persian workman\nship, culminating in a unique type of\nth? art. This Chinese-Persian culture\nreached the height of its development\nearly in the twelfth century.\nPersian Rivalry In 9th Century..\nDuring the latter half of the ninth\ncentury, the Persian spirit of rivalry\nwas likewise aroused by the talent ex\nhibited by the neighboring Armenians\nin producing bright colors for pottery\ndecoration. The secret of making\nbright reds and blues was for centuries\nknown only to the Armenians. The\nPersian desire to acquire this knowl\nedge finally grew so acute that the\nPersian ruler, Shah Abbaz, forced the\nArmenians to labor in Persian work\nshops and to produce their native art\nas a Persian product. Although resent\nful, the Armenians yielded the secret\nof their art. it is said, due to the\ndiplomacy of Shah Abbaz, who after\nthe fashion of Haroun-al-Raschid\nmingled wdth them in disguise. He\nvisited the workshops dressed as a\npeasant, consoling the Armenians with\nkindly conversation as well as honoring\nthem with his presence at their places\nof worship and even feasting them.\nThus, gaining the admiration and con\nfidence of the Armenian people, Shah\nAbbaz likewise obtained the secret of\nproducing bright colors, especially the\ncobalt blue, which to the present time\nIs popularly accredited to Persian\ntalent.\nBowl Held Choicest Specimen.\nA bowl 8 Inches In diameter and 4\ninches deep, decorated with flowing de\nsigns of cobalt blue, reminding one of\nthe graceful traceries or the art of the\nanciqit East, is considered by Dr.\nHough as the choicest specimen in the\ncollection.\nThe acquisition of this material from\ntl \u25a0 Calusd art collection of this city\nwas made possible by the aid of the\nBruce Hughes Archeological Fund.\nDerailment Is Investigated.\nMEXICO CITY, October 4 OP).\u2014Sev\neral detectives were sent yesterday to\nAguae Calient* to Investigate the de\nrailment near there Thursday of a pas\nenger train bound for Mexico City.\nThe accident was caused by the re\nmoval of a section of rail from the\ntrack. Pour members of the train crew\nWere Injured.\nt Another Brilliant\nFashion \u201cScoop\u201d\nby Hahn Specials\ntweeds!\nFall suits of brown or\nblack TWEED\u2014find\ntheir most effective com\nplement in these new\nbrown or black TWEED,\nkid-trim \u201cHahn Spe\n\u201cLady Luxury*\u2019 new dull\ncomplete your sartorial\nThe bag*\u2014 j 207 F\n$2.95, $3.95 7th & K\ns4.9s\u2014and up 3212 14th\n| . MARRIED SEPTEMBER 25\nv\n- 1\n;JPli /\n' - W ih *** 1\nI /\njayrk j M\nMRS. ALEXANDER WINOCOUR,\nFormerly Miss Mary Ann Griffith, daughter of Mrs. Grace Etchlson Griffith,\nher marriage to Mr. Winocour of Stockholm, Sweden, taking place in the home\nof the bride's brother-in-law and atster, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Gawlis.\n' . \u2014Bachrach Photo.\njyr--.i-r-\u2022 a\n/ 7 9\nisl hr\nh \u2022 K,\\ I\n| gHLra\nBffiTmfnfii i arl \u2019T \u25a0\n* \u25a0&\n\u25a0 \u25a0\u25a0 Hit -Y*v \u2022.'\u25a0\u2022\u2022'\n; I rrcsto \u2014\nS P .\nm 81\nTHE SUNDAY STAR, WASHINGTON, D. C., OCTOBER 5, 1930\u2014PART THREE. Sir\n\u25a0sK \u2022\nThe Immense wm \u00ab \u00ab\u00ab j|\nSuccess of Our j I fIG I\\StV JSIIO ft S '/\nOpening Week ff ,\n. , . We Park Your Car While You Shop Here - /\n\u2014has, we think, stamped the im\npress indelibly upon the minds '\"JJ \"f ' ij 11 , n ~..| |ir - n _\nbeaiityoT'the\nness of fashions... the very |\nking policy of fashion with value f% HB\napproval for our new W M\nanflft <m Be\nWe completely ready in gBHMB \"kMIBB '\nevery particular for Fall and A jgl\nWinter activities. May we not \u25a0BBejKBBk' 'At */.4s \u25a0\u2022'\u2022\u2022.\nsnppc't the convenience of a -\u2022* \u00a3 \" BBBHM|^^^BBfeii*\ncharge not al- : '\" /\"o4PvB\n\u2022, IMHJ * W \\ x -' r>\nPatou tor paOel \u25a0 - m\nto nr ron- <v -\nMHK \\ *v L\nDrlu ious pair shades pink, ,/A\n/ V \\ x* ~ ,v\nkjr I *\n~r /\n$5 95 J \\ \\ U\nLustrous.. dainty ...exquisitely made | \"W87\"7\u201d 9 9 .*'\n\u2014these evening bags in accord with II mm/ 7 /'\"I \u25a0 *-w-*-/->\u00ab /\nChanel's inspiration suit the romantic \u25a0 kflfl I \u00a7-\u201c fl \u25a0 B .\u25a0kVk I W\nmood of evening fashions. Baguette f f kj - * : \"-\"\u2018\nor simulated jade frames heighten - f.\ntheir charm. Eggshell or white. so A,' .\nBaa Shop\u2014Street Floor \"WWTT* fl *1 T| \u2022 TTB 1 * f f /\nWith a Fans Background\nCrystal and Gold | * |\nNecklaces | Couturier replicas that catch the true \u201cfeeling\u201d of Paris .. . the subtlety that makes sash-\nAfter Lelong \u2014 ions inimitably new .. . these are the copies in the Jelleff collection. And because that feel- *: v '\ning is reproduced as perfectly as the detail of sleeve or collar or fur . . . because the subtlety\nmT that marks this coat a Paquin and that a Bruyere is caught and held . . . these coats be-\nSfc come more than just copies ... they are \u201csisters in the blood!\u201d /\nty Patou is distinguished by his use of long-haired furs and the\nm The Collection Includes Theset \u00ab\u00ab of borders .an excellent detail for women's coats. The\n,j\u00a3Z{S Patou shown at the left trims a lusterless fabric with black Ali|C\nVinnn.t f\u00b0 x an( l a^s a l 6x border\n~ Bruyere * . , Paquin prefers the slender lines with only a slight flare and ne\nThe \"Marie Antoinette\u201d necklace of Patou Paquin favors flat furs in the new tut-off half shawl. This Paquin,\nbrilliant simulated crystal combined , . ... T *i___ center, uses a shawl of mink, and pointed cuffs on a dull\nwith rondells, disks or beads of gold Schiaparelli Lelong fabric coat V\"\"\u00ae\nsuggest less formal antique jewelry Lanvin Renee Martial et Armand introduce the shawl collar that drops about\nj so good this season. Either choker *\u00bb_.\u2022\u00bb . * the shoulders like a cape ..or the square, voke-like front.\nstyle or 2 and 3 strand models ac- Martial et Armand Miranae The square _ cut co n ar e s Persian lamh gives excellent lines $10?\ncent the afternoon mode. Lucile Paray Maggy Rouff to a black coat with modified barrel cuffs\n$1.95 to $lB\nCottume Jewelry\u2014Street Floor || The Women\u2019s Finer Coat Shop-Third Floor. Success Coats to $69.50-Fourth Floor.\n\\ \\\\ JL l\u2018 /n / \u201cCorynth,\u201d the Rich\n| Red-Purple of Patoi\nI \u2014'> the Half-Crown Hat 59\nI Fnlialfi Fli/alu lh Patou has created a \u2022\nj rntnWlUre Bnlista niizauetn luscious, cru s hed\nArden\u2019s Aid for blackberry tone that - \u2022\nis stunning for ;\nSix a.m., golf. . .shopping.. .teaing, till 4 a.tn. danc- Rpailtifld Eves Sophisticated worn- Urf\ning\u2014each requires a different type stocking\u2014one OeauUlUi EjJCS This dress uses '/ ts M-M\nthat\u2019s right in weight, sheen and fashion \u2014and Gold [if\nStripe provides them, numbered for convenience. | w .\u00b0 co * or <|CCentS to \u2018| BW\nFor sports, No. 579 mesh $1.95 Charming is the new hat 0 f the Corynth can- | I\nFor street, No. 531, dull chiffon $1.50 mode\u2014but pitilessly reveal- ton\u2014old rose lined |r\\V;flT\u00a7^^\nI For afternoon, No. 591 dull chiffon. $1.95\nFor evening, No. 340 sheerest chiffon.... $2.95 beauty-make them look futons II\nF , . O t D large, mysterious, intriguing at The \"If 11'-''\nExclusive r atOU Drown w j t h the right cosmetiques. dress is intricately ;Mm Br^j^\nDyed specially at Jelleff\u2019s request to meet the seamed in that seem-\nincreasing demand for this dark, dark brown Arden\u2019s Liquid Cosmetique\u2014 ing simp lcity t at b\nthat is so prominent in smarter dress and shoe grooms and darkens lashes and fashiorf Iw H\nfashions. In the same famous Qold Stripe brows. sl. \u2022 'r\u00a3 '\u2022 \u00a3\nquality. Stocking number 591, a dull crepe Venetian Eye Sha-Do Paste\u2014 f -fe.\nweave, at $1.95 or number 531 at $1.50. rids depth and lustre to eyes, 83wf*SS&2Jr iflg ..T \\ PW i'\nmakes them seem larger. $1.50. the talk of the town. J [\\ \\ .. kvj;\nGold Stripe Silk Stockings A room worth seeing for / \\ .\nare exclusive with Jelleff\u2019s in Washington. Venetian Eyelash Grower\u2014 one^inte _ , v\nAdditional Qold Stripe and Drett Shop, Stoneleigh Court, makes lashes long. $2.\n1 1013 Connecticut Avenue SHeabeth Arden Shop\u2014Street Floor\n11", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_oliver_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "evening star.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1930-10-05/ed-1/seq-55.json", 
      "place": [
        "District of Columbia--Washington"
      ], 
      "page": "11"
    }, 
    {
      "sequence": 29, 
      "county": [
        "New York"
      ], 
      "edition": null, 
      "frequency": "Daily", 
      "id": "/lccn/sn83030214/1907-10-20/ed-1/seq-29/", 
      "section_label": "", 
      "city": [
        "New York"
      ], 
      "date": "19071020", 
      "title": "New-York tribune.", 
      "end_year": 1924, 
      "note": [
        "Archived issues are available in digital format as part of the Library of Congress Chronicling America online collection.", 
        "Available on microfilm from University Microfilms International, and Recordak.", 
        "Evening ed.: Evening edition of the tribune, 1866.", 
        "Merged with: New York herald (New York, N.Y. : 1920); to form: New York herald, New York tribune.", 
        "Semiweekly ed.: New-York tribune (New York, N.Y. : 1866 : Semiweekly), 1866-<1899>.", 
        "Triweekly eds.: New-York tri-weekly tribune, <1900>-1903, and: New York tribune (New York, N.Y. : 1903), 1903-<1909>.", 
        "Weekly ed.: New-York tribune (New York, N.Y. : 1866 : Weekly), 1866-<1906>."
      ], 
      "state": [
        "New York"
      ], 
      "subject": [
        "New York (N.Y.)--Newspapers.", 
        "New York (State)--New York County.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01234953", 
        "New York (State)--New York.--fast--(OCoLC)fst01204333", 
        "New York County (N.Y.)--Newspapers."
      ], 
      "type": "page", 
      "place_of_publication": "New York [N.Y.]", 
      "start_year": 1866, 
      "edition_label": "", 
      "publisher": "New York Tribune", 
      "language": [
        "English"
      ], 
      "alt_title": [
        "Combined New York morning newspapers", 
        "Combined New York Sunday newspapers", 
        "New York daily tribune", 
        "New York tribune", 
        "New-York daily tribune"
      ], 
      "lccn": "sn83030214", 
      "country": "New York", 
      "ocr_eng": "Lost Cities Awaiting Discovery\nAn Opportunity for Wealthy Young Men to Earn Distinction\nNOTWITHSTANDING all the ex\nplorations of the last three centu\nries, there are still lying under\nground in all parts of the ancient world\nnoble cities of the distant past that await\nbut the spade of the investigator to\nrender up their treasures of art and their\nsecrets of history. It is a curious cir\ncumstance that while the study of the\nancient languages in school and college\ni.a> lost much of it s former importance\nin the last generation; no age has taken\na greater interest than this in the monu\nments of ancient civilization that are con\nstantly coming to light . Devoted scholars\ntithe New World\" as well as the Old\nare betaking themselves to the outermost\ncorners of the earth. \u2014 to the forests of\nYucatan and Ceylon, to the ari<l sands\nof Egypt and the l>leak deserts of Syria\nand Turkestan, \u2014 where, often at the risk\nof health and always at the sacrifice of\nl>ersonal comfort, they are rebuilding for\nus t'ue fabric of ancient life, completing\nand verifying history and tradition, and placing\nbefore our eyes by means of photographs the cities\nand burial places, and. by means. if objects gathered\nin museums, the art and industry of peoples long\nvanished and often forgotten, but to whom we\nourselves owe .... our civilization] out arts,\nand our religions.\nBooks on archeologieal travel and exploration\nare making their apja/arance in ever increasing\nnumbers, and their ready sale bears witness to the\nintense popular interest that the American j\u00bbeople\nare taking in the work of these pioneers of history.\nWhat belter proof could we have than the fact thai\nmany foreign writers publish their works :n English,\n!\u2022 - Lanciani on the excavations of Rome, l'ais on\nquestions of Roman legend and history, and Man\nen Pomjfeii?\nThat this jx>pular zeal for archeologieal and\nhistorical investigation is coincident with a de\ncline in the importance generally given to classical\nStudies in this country, is due to two fundamental\ncauses; First, the essentially practical stage of edu\ncational methods through whieli we are passing;\nand Hwrnl, the wretched system of classical in\nstruction which -afflicted our colleges and univer\nsities during the last fifty years, condemning the\nstudents to arid philological disquisitions, and\nrobbing the fascinating life and literature of the\nCreeks and Romans of all its beauty. There are\nmany and evident signs that the tide is turning, \u2014\nhas been turning for ten years,\u2014 and if the future\nof classical scholarship in America now looks brighter\nthan ever before, the credit must be given to the\nexplorers and investigators of buried cities and\ncemeteries, and to those who have j>opulanzed the\nresults of their work in attractive !>'..>ks and enter\ntaining lectures.\nWhere Are the Old Cities\nTPHERE are three leading questions that everyone\n\u25a0*\u25a0 who makes a special study of archeology is\ncalled ujxin to answer almost daily: First, how does\nit happen that ancient cities in their entirety were\ncovered with earth, forming sometimes veritable\nhills of their own materials, and preserving their\ntreasures of wealth and art until our days' Second,\nhave not the ravages of time and the avarice of\nman, and lately the spade of the\nexcavator, already well nigh\ndespoiled ancient sites? An i\nthird, where are the renowned\ncities of the past that still lie\nunexplored.' To answer these\nquestions sufficiently and ex\nhaustively would require a book;\nl.nt 1 shall try to do what 1\ncan within the limits of a brief\npaper.\nIhe first question involves a\n\u00ab. implicated answer, for the\n<..\u2022\u25a0-\u25a0. v; that determined ihe decay\nBy GEORGE N. OLCOTT\nProfeuur of Roman Archeology. Columbia University\nDrawing! v II v_\nor fall of ancient cities were different in different\ntimes \u2022.'::\u25a0: unique example \"I Pompeii;\nHerculaneum; nd Stabia? i;- familiar to all Three\nflourishing towns, with the fertile farm.- ml smiling\nvillas a!>\"nt them; were overwhelmed in one night\nby the awful river of lava and rain of ashes from\nthe volcano; and since the recent eruption of\nVesuvius and that of Mont lVlee we have been able\nti\u00bb study these phenomena in all their terrible reality.\nBut such was n<<t the lot \"i the hundreds and thou\nsands of cities and towns of the ancient world.\nHow then is it that they too were buried, not by a\nsudden visitation <\u25a0! fate, but !>y the hand <\u2022' man\nor the slow, engulfing lapse 01 time?\nConsider the turbulent conditions of ancient life.\nWar was the spirit of the age,:\u2014 state against state\nand city against city in implacable rivalry, until\nRome by conquering all brought peace within the\nboundaries of civilization; The laws of early war\nfare knew little of the sentiment of mercy, '\u2022\u25a0.uc a\ncity was taken and sacked, its people, men. women)\nan ! children, were sold into slavery or put to the\nsword, its buildings and walls razed to the ground,\nand, as if to preclude it> ever rising from its ashes,\nthe very' site was plowed over and leveled with the\nsurrounding plain. A Horace says:\nProud cities by -anger have come to their fall,\nWalls anil towers been razed l>y a fell demolition,\nAnd the plow with its furrows ha-; covered them all.\nThe Fate of Carthage\nSL'CH was the fate \u00ab\u00bbf Saguntum in Spain at the\nhands of Hannibal in 218 H. (' . and such in turn\nwas the terrible end of Carthage itself only seventy^\ntwo years afterward ; and these are only two familiar\nexamples out of hundreds. (In both sites later\ntowns arose, built over the old cities, with no attempt\nto recover and utilize the earlier building materials;\nand indeed this would not have repaid the trouble,\nso complete had been the devastation. <>f imperial\nCarthage,- the Romans did not leave one stone stand\ning on another; and of Saguntum; Livy tell-, us\nthat ju>t before Hannibal made the final breach in\nthe walls, the chief citizens, with the fell determina\ntion of despair, gathered in a vast pile in the central\nsquare gold and silver bullion, com, vessels, and\nstatues, --everything of value both public and\nprivate, \u2014 reduced the \\\\h<>k' by tire to\na mas of shapeless wreckage ', and threw\nthemselves into the seething flames Wi.\nhe says, '-The town was taken with\nimmense booty. Though almost every;\nthing had been puq>osely destroyed by\nthe citizens, and in the promiscuous\nmassacre old and \\.u:i^ alike had per\nished; and what few captives were taken\nalive became the booty of the soldiery,\nnevertheless from the public auction of\nwhat was left a large sum of money was\n.secured, and much precious household\nfurniture and clot hint; was sent to Car\nthage.\"\nHie later towns disappeared :n their\ntime, and Roman Paguntum is repre\nsented to-day by some ruins known\nas Mtihtidnl [Old Walls]; while of\nRoman Carthage, the great metropolis\nof the African Christian writers, only\nmeager remains are being gradually\nbrought to light by the skilled researches\nof E'ere 1 Matt re\nCity built over city \u2022 > the story of ancient\nbarbarity. X<> less than nine distinct towns anil\nvillages 'have Keen found sujKTposed on the hilloi\nHissarlik, the site of an. ient Troy. It was far ::. >re\nconvenient to throw down the dismantled walls'and\nlevel the place tor a new community,\u2014 and whu\nwould delay sifch a work to dig into the rubbish\nunderneath in the jK>ssibility ol finding hidden\ntreasure? Tims ... after town on Hissarlik hill\narose on tin- rums of its predecessor; .nul Alexander\nthe Great visited there the wretched village of his\nday in a spirit of reverence for the legend of Priam\nand Hector\"; but the tinding of the great silver\ntreasure near the Scira'n Gate was reserved Dr.\nSchliemann ami modern scholarship\nHut not even tiie violence of warfare can account\n!\u2022\u2022:\u25a0 tiie burial of must ancient cities. A still more\nactive cause may be found, curiously enough, in\nthe growth of tin- cities themselves, or in circum\nstances due to a shifting of population, or a change\nof rulers, or even to the adoption of .1 new religion]\nTo us of modern times this inns', seem decidedly\nstrange; but it 1^ a fact none the less, In our cities,\nwhere we construct a new building on the site of an\nold one, we are careful to remove the debris and\nbuild on bedrock'; or at least on the old level We\nseek to cut down hills, and traffic requires a broad,\nsmooth surface for our streets\nBut in ancient times such was not the case, or\nrather it was a rule that oj>eratod to a lcs.-\u00bb degree;\nand even when it did operate, as in Rome, it pro\nduced just the result lam describing In the earlier\ndays, when commerce was secondary to war. the\nmost inaccessible sites were chosen for towns, that\nthey might !>e defended more easily. That is why\nTroy arose on the hill of Ilissarlik, and Rome on\nthe Palatine; and even where growing commerce\nand civilization spread the town over the plain. it.->\nsae:vd and public buildings remained perched on\nthe inaccessible hill, its original seat; a^ in the ease\nof the Acropolis at Athens and the Acrocorinthus!\nWho can travel in Italy to-day without wondering\nat the small town, .if Tuscany and L'inbria set s.\u00bb\nhigh on the mountain lops that the peasants must\nlo.^l- an hour or two a day in getting down to their\nwork in the fields an i back to bed at night? These\nare survivals of the age of war. Little Palatine\nRome of the eighth century before our era was a\nsettlement of shepherds, who\ndrove their flocks down in the\nmorning to browse in the plains,\nanil barricaded themselves at\nnight in their highland fortress.\nOld Buildings as Foundations\nT>L'T when Koine grew into a\n*-\" it valid spread over the sev\nen hill-, and the intervening\nvalleys, the very isolation of the\nhills which had been a source\nof safety and defense became,\nan ol .stack* to progress. Hence,\n5", 
      "batch": "batch_dlc_jamaica_ver01", 
      "title_normal": "new-york tribune.", 
      "url": "http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030214/1907-10-20/ed-1/seq-29.json", 
      "place": [
        "New York--New York--New York"
      ], 
      "page": "5"
    }
  ]
}

In [90]:
# dump json to file
import json
with open('data.json', 'w') as outfile:
    json.dump(data, outfile)